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English English & American English

Discussion in 'General Chit-Chat' started by Lila, Jan 24, 2006.

  1. Lila

    Lila Boston!

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    You can throw Canadian English in there too if you want. ;)

    We were discussing some of the differences in our language in the 'About Forum' section. Thought I'd bring it over here.

    Our last discussion was about Football and Soccer... I mean, Football.

    ;)

    Lila
     
  2. DansMarineTank

    DansMarineTank This ship is England!

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    Maybee if i get some pictures together you guys can name them in american?

    [​IMG]

    We call the bit at the front, under which the engine is housed, a bonnet.

    [​IMG]

    We call the bit at the back, that lifts and reveals storage space a boot

    [​IMG]

    A gentleman is filling his car with petrol

    [​IMG]

    This is called a gear knob

    back to the football thing, Ipswich (UK), the small town i live in, actually has an american football (NFL) team the Ipswich Cardinals I may give them a look. I am a footballer 5ft 10" 10 stone 5Lb but i bet if i was to wear more armour than Sir Lancelot i would be able to play American Football.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. msouth468

    msouth468 Fighting for the little guy

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    The engine is under the hood.

    The storage place is a trunk.

    Fill the car with gas.

    The shifter is the fourth.

    And, if you were playing with 400 pound linemen you would want allot of armor too.
     
  4. Lila

    Lila Boston!

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    I learned 'bonnet', 'boot' and 'loo' when I was in Jr. High.

    That's a hood.

    A trunk.

    Gas.

    Gear shift (or stick)

    And that is not football pads, darling. That's a suit of plate armor. Sorry, armour.

    ;)

    Lila
     
  5. Galaxie

    Galaxie AC Members

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    I think rugby is the toughest sport out there. Those guys are just insane and don't wear any padding. English football, being just soccer, isn't any rougher than NBA basketball. You are allowed to bump a little, but get a foul called if its excessive.

    There was a comment made earlier about some NFL guys being excessively large. Well, there are multiple defensive and offensive linemen going to the Pro Bowl who are in the 340+ pound range. 300 pounds is the norm. Its amazing how quick these big guys are, and it typically takes two 250 lb players to guard them....or another 340 pounder. They have a singular job function: don't let anyone get by them...and they do it well. They are professionals, so stay as huge as they need to be.

    ...back to language... "knickers" ....is this the English word for underwear or do people in America use it?
     
  6. Lila

    Lila Boston!

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    knickers...I use it sometimes. When conversing with the English.

    There's a saying they have the I like to use (cept round my husband. He hates when I use their slangs). 'That just gets on my t*ts'.

    LOL. That cracks me up.

    I also use, 'P*ss take' or 'taking the p*ss'.

    They've got some cool slangs! What?
     
  7. Tyler718

    Tyler718 AC Members

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    Isn't that a basketball team in New York. :D

    "T"
     
  8. reiverix

    reiverix Aye

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    Does Scots-English count :p:

    I've learned to adjust my way of speaking through the years. It was hard to say soccer instead of football. Didn't seem right. Anyway it's just words. The only thing that makes me cringe a bit is when people here say plaid when they really mean tartan.
     
  9. DansMarineTank

    DansMarineTank This ship is England!

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    a firend of mine is very much into his slang

    let me translate a few

    "Thats well weapon" - very good
    "the nuts" or the "Muts Nuts" or "Dogs Danglys" - very good
    "Ball Bags" - Bad or Whack as you yankees would say


    lila - I have found a picture of an NFL footballer now
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Larissa

    Larissa Katherine Hope

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    Let's not forget "Pram" instead of baby carriage or that "napkins" over here are not "napkins" across the pond. Yeah, the way they used p***ed cracks me up, too.
     
  11. UncaBret

    UncaBret Yummmm!

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    After all, it was an American that invented the automobile.
     
  12. DansMarineTank

    DansMarineTank This ship is England!

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    we also call them buggies and trippers (prams that is)

    other words for drunk are mullered, pie eyed, hammered, smashed, sh@t faced, w@nkered
     
  13. msouth468

    msouth468 Fighting for the little guy

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    I haven't heard the term "Wack" in a long time.
     
  14. DansMarineTank

    DansMarineTank This ship is England!

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    not really true first true automobile was created by a German gentleman named Karl Hiez Benz

    http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/mysteries/auto.html

    It was the Americans that first mass produced the car, but that cannot be credited with its invention.
     
  15. dougall

    dougall ...

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    If I'm asked to dig deep,

    I'm quite fond of the words Buggered and Chuffed.
     
  16. DansMarineTank

    DansMarineTank This ship is England!

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    You cant throw around words like b(_)ggered without attempt at censorship ;-)
     
  17. Galaxie

    Galaxie AC Members

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    "randy" is a neat word too.

    Do I make you randy baby? yeah!
    re: Austin Powers
     
  18. UncaBret

    UncaBret Yummmm!

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    Oh, yeah! Throw that up in my face!

    (Actually, I was hoping you would say "But it was an Englishman who invented the language". It's an old joke. Never mind.)
     
  19. UncaBret

    UncaBret Yummmm!

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    Well, you can here cause most people don't know what the bloody 'ell yer talkin' aboot.
     
  20. dougall

    dougall ...

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    You only need to censor from those in the know..

    While I'm feeling naughty, I'll let slip my favorite all-time English saying

    Tighter than a nun's chuff

    (I'm not quite sure how colloquial this would be, it may just be a Yorkshire thing)


    In a slightly related note.. I'm wondering what our American friends would make of English Kid's TV from decades past..
     

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