Welcome to AquariaCentral.com

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. You will be entering into a wonderful world of aquatic information, for all aquarists, no matter what their experience level.

Our members will do their best to help you in your aquarium endeavors. We have a vast assortment of Forums to dive into:

-General Freshwater
-Marine and Brackish area
-Terrarium and Vivariums
-Coldwater
-DIY, Classifieds, Members Tanks Photographs and more.

We even have a general area, that is just as much fun as the rest of the Community, for off topic discussions and a real-time chat room for instant advice!

Joining Aquaria Central has numerous benefits, but the best, is our 112,000+ members, helping one another in this fascinating hobby!

Register now, and be sure to check out our scheduled contests with exciting prizes!

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today! !

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.

Welcome to the Internet's friendliest aquatic forum!

- Team AC

Sign Up

explain to me how a bio ball filter works??

Discussion in 'Freshwater Equipment, Products, & DIY' started by Gumby131, Apr 6, 2007.

  1. Gumby131

    Gumby131 cod fishing

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2006
    Messages:
    684
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    music teacher
    Location:
    East Gippy, Vic
    i presume this filter is a bioball filter?????

    and if it is could someone tell me how it works so i can construct one myself?
    i would like the heater in the corner unit awell if thats all good.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. LittlePuff

    LittlePuff LittlePuff

    Joined:
    May 18, 2004
    Messages:
    770
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Respiratory Therapist Student
    Location:
    Peoria,IL
    Bio-balls are bio-media you place inside a HOB filter for biological filtration.
     
  3. Gumby131

    Gumby131 cod fishing

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2006
    Messages:
    684
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    music teacher
    Location:
    East Gippy, Vic
    is that one in the pic a bioball filter?
     
  4. abh19

    abh19 AC Members

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2007
    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    is that the right picture? I don't see any filter. Very nice rocks though.
     
  5. liv2padl

    liv2padl cichlidophile

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2005
    Messages:
    2,686
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    north carolina
    there's no magic in 'bioballs'. it's simply media for bacteria to grow on. in my opinion, a standard filter which uses sponge media is simpler, less costly to purchase and does just fine. they like to say that bioballs allow for growing 'more' bacteria but in fact, your filter can only grow that concentration of bacteria which is supported by the ammonia put out by the number of fish you have.
     
  6. loaches r cool

    loaches r cool Snail Terminator

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2006
    Messages:
    1,830
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Generation Dispatch, American Electric Power
    Location:
    Gahanna, Ohio
    I dont know much about bio balls personally but seems like folks say here all the time there not that good in normal filters, more suited for wet/dry trickle filters (which I assume is due to the more open spacing being able to allow more air through the media?). For media they have a lower surface area per volume than most other good media.
     
  7. arl

    arl AC Members

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2006
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    bio balls works best on trickle filters. They're not that good when fully submerged. Rule is "The slower the drip rate the better. and the taller the bio balls the better. They say that when more than 2 feet deep and slow drip rate even nitrates are broken down or controlled. How it does that is beyond me, cause there sure wouldn't be any enearobic bacterias present in that condition.
     
  8. Gumby131

    Gumby131 cod fishing

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2006
    Messages:
    684
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    music teacher
    Location:
    East Gippy, Vic
    what is the filtert in the pic?
     
  9. Rbishop

    Rbishop The glistening drop....
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Messages:
    36,725
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    Production Manager
    Gumby....I don't see a filter in the picture you posted. There is what appears to be a powerhead discharge in the upper left. I would assume that background is false and there are some mechanicals back there. The power head could be just for circulation. Where did the pic come from..have a link?
     
  10. loaches r cool

    loaches r cool Snail Terminator

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2006
    Messages:
    1,830
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Generation Dispatch, American Electric Power
    Location:
    Gahanna, Ohio
    In order to tell what kind of filter it is we need to see the filter not just a tank. It could really be anything. All we can see is the outflow of something thats heavily aerated, presumably a powerhead as rbishop has said. And bio-balls are just the media inside the filter, which I assume your really trying to figure out what the filter is not necessarily what kind of media is in it?
     
  11. biowyo

    biowyo AC Members

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2007
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    ARL:
    anaerobic means living only in oxygen rich environment, thats why the balls work so well with a slow drip, humid conditions but open to the air. they cant live under water so for you to say "They say that when more than 2 feet deep and slow drip rate even nitrates are broken down or controlled. How it does that is beyond me, cause there sure wouldn't be any enearobic bacterias present in that condition." ; would be just the opposite of what is a proven fact in every single professional aquarium world wide as they all use a similar form of anaerobic bacteria culturing just for the purpose of converting ammonia to nitrite - nitrate.
     
  12. Shocker6966

    Shocker6966 AC Members

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2006
    Messages:
    477
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Boilermaker
    Location:
    Peterborough, Ontario
    I think you're trying to say "Aerobic" and "Anaerobic", meaning using oxygen and not using oxygen. The process that nitrifying bacteria carry out is an aerobic one. This is why your wet/dry and aerated filters are more efficient than standard models.

    All moving water with exposure to air is oxygenated, whether it is 2 feet or 2 miles deep. This is why aerobic creatures, such as nitrifying bacteria, fish, invertebrates, and so on can live in an aquatic environment. As for nitrates being broken down or controlled, the only way to accomplish this other than water changes or chemical additives is using nitrate consuming plants. The bacterial chain ends at nitrates.
     
  13. Rbishop

    Rbishop The glistening drop....
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Messages:
    36,725
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Occupation:
    Production Manager
    As for nitrates being broken down or controlled, the only way to accomplish this other than water changes or chemical additives is using nitrate consuming plants.

    Not exactly true.
     
  14. khuongtran69

    khuongtran69 AC Members

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2007
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Australia
    Gumby, the pic you posted is just the tank not the filter. The bio ball is just a filter media which you put in the filter for the bacteria that break down ammonia and nitrite to live on.
     
  15. GregS

    GregS AC Members

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2007
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have heard of denitrators that work by slow flow rates in long-ish tubes full of bio balls, which if I recall are colonised by ANaerobic bacteria. Have a google of coil denitrator and see what comes up - appears salt water aquaria use them. the mechanics of them I dont know, except that exist and are used in aquariums.

    cheers

    Greg
     
  16. LittlePuff

    LittlePuff LittlePuff

    Joined:
    May 18, 2004
    Messages:
    770
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Respiratory Therapist Student
    Location:
    Peoria,IL
    Let us know how the nitrate#'s are going.
     
  17. musho3210

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2007
    Messages:
    1,550
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    yeah if the nitrogen cycle ended at nitrates, then the natural waters of the world that has no plants will be like pure nitrates lol.


    Fish poop/Decaying food/decaying plants
    ammonia
    nitrite
    nitrate--------------------------------->nitrogen, releases into atmosphere
    plants (or algae) eats nitrate
    Fish eats plants/plants die
    Repeat

    Thats natures nitrogen cycle, most aquariums skip the nitrate to nitrogen part and rather use water changes. Im sure something on earth converts nitrogen into something else, and then converts that to something else etc until it reaches square 1. If god didnt make these in a circular motion, then there probably wouldnt be no world.
     
  18. Derringer

    Derringer ... overstock this!

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    768
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Indiana
    These are Bio Balls

    [​IMG]


    Check out this site >http://www.gec.jp/WATER/data/water_10-1.html

    Not exactly dealing with aquariums, but it offers something to consider regarding water treatment and bio-balls.
     
  19. musho3210

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2007
    Messages:
    1,550
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    bio-balls is just filter media anyways, you could use sponge as a wet/dry media. Bio-balls just offer a bit more surface area.
     
  20. TEL

    TEL AC Members

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2007
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Brisbane Australia
    creamic noodles or sinted glass can go in any filter and do a much better job then plastic bio balls because they have a greater surface area to grow good bateria
     

Share This Page

zoomed.com
tfhmagazine.com
hikariusa.com
aqaimports.com
Store