Welcome to AquariaCentral.com

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. You will be entering into a wonderful world of aquatic information, for all aquarists, no matter what their experience level.

Our members will do their best to help you in your aquarium endeavors. We have a vast assortment of Forums to dive into:

-General Freshwater
-Marine and Brackish area
-Terrarium and Vivariums
-Coldwater
-DIY, Classifieds, Members Tanks Photographs and more.

We even have a general area, that is just as much fun as the rest of the Community, for off topic discussions and a real-time chat room for instant advice!

Joining Aquaria Central has numerous benefits, but the best, is our 112,000+ members, helping one another in this fascinating hobby!

Register now, and be sure to check out our scheduled contests with exciting prizes!

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today! !

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.

Welcome to the Internet's friendliest aquatic forum!

- Team AC

Sign Up

Marine Discussion: Physics of the fish tank

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by sumthin fishy, Apr 23, 2006.

  1. sumthin fishy

    sumthin fishy I eat spam

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Messages:
    1,767
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    contractor
    Location:
    cali
    Last Seen:
    Jan 15, 2015
    Those are the only errors Ive found. You are right, most of this was totally irrelavant to me, but interesting enough that I read the whole thing. Put in the simplest possible terms, I was able to understand the majority of it. GREAT JOB :thm:
     
  2. vidiots

    vidiots AC Members

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2006
    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Metrologist
    Location:
    Wakefield, New Hampshire
    Last Seen:
    Jan 29, 2012
    Water Displacement


    An explanation of #5, with a few more details. The answer that the true mass of the object is fixed, is correct. If you were to take a 1000g steel weight with a density of 8.0g/cm3 and add it to an aquarium that was sitting on top of a scale the weight of the aquarium would increase by 1000g. However if you were to place the scale inside the aquarium and put the 1000g weight on the scale you will find that the scale would indicate slightly less than 1000g. The buoyancy effect is still there even if the object sinks. The downward force of the 1000g weight on the submerged scale would be decreased by the weight of the water that it is displacing.

    1000g / 8g/cm3 = 125 cm3 (volume of 1000g weight)

    The volume of the 1000g weight is equal to the volume of the water that it is displacing. Water has a density of 1.0g/cm3

    125cm3 * 1.0g/cm3 = 125g (weight of displaced water)
    1000g - 125g = 875g (value indicated on the scale)

    The scale submerged in the aquarium would indicate that the 1000g weight was only 875g. This is because the pan of the scale would be supporting 875g of the total weight and the water would be supporting the other 125g.

    Being a metrologist I have to compensate for the buoyancy effect in air when making precision mass measurements. The math works the same only the density of air is approx 0.0012g/cm3.

    As for what floats, any thing with a density less than water (<1.0g/cm3), and any object with a density greater than water will sink.
     
  3. vidiots

    vidiots AC Members

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2006
    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Metrologist
    Location:
    Wakefield, New Hampshire
    Last Seen:
    Jan 29, 2012
    Pressure Measurement

    A simple way of measuring water pressure is using a ruler to measure its verticle height or depth. Most unit converters will have inches of water listed as a pressure unit to select.
    If you wanted to be ultra precise 1 psi is approximately equal to 27.73 inches of water at 20°C.
     
  4. partsrep

    partsrep Go Yankees!

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2005
    Messages:
    107
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Sales manager
    Location:
    LI, NY
    Last Seen:
    Jan 26, 2008
    So I believe a quarter round corner tank would use the same equation as a cylindrical tank divided by four. Would you agree?

    Excellent article Joephys.
     
  5. born2lovefish

    born2lovefish AC Members

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2006
    Messages:
    415
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    student
    Location:
    Avon, In (suburb of Indianapolis)
    Last Seen:
    Feb 21, 2015
    Only error I found was "they" and I think it should have been the. Other than that nice article. I am in physics right now and some of that stuff makes sense. Very interesting.
     
  6. joephys

    joephys AC Members

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2005
    Messages:
    768
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Last Seen:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Thanks for the proof read sumthin fishy.

    Vidiots, thanks for pointing that out. After reading that I agree I do need to explain it a little better. To me weight=mass x acceleration due to gravity, so the situation you described, I would call the apparent weight in the water. I will update it in a bit.

    You would be correct partsrep.

    I am glad that people are finding it at least some what interesting, and that I did an ok job keeping it in simple terms. I think that is the thing that keeps people away from science, I looks and sounds more difficult than it actually is.
     
  7. beblondie

    beblondie grand high exhalted poobah

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2005
    Messages:
    567
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Last Seen:
    Aug 16, 2009
    Overall good article 3 probs i noticed
    1.Proper volume needs to be inside measurements (if this was mentioned I missed it)
    2. you need the weight of the empty tank+water weight (see chart here http://www.all-glass.com/services/index.html)
    3. for every 50 lbs of decoration substrate,rocks etc etc. you will displace 2.2 gallons of water
     
  8. vidiots

    vidiots AC Members

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2006
    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Occupation:
    Metrologist
    Location:
    Wakefield, New Hampshire
    Last Seen:
    Jan 29, 2012
    At work I try to avoid using the word "weight" because it can lead to confusion. Instead I try to use "Mass" or "Force". It's difficult because we were all brought up using the word "weight" to mean both of these.
     
  9. Bigbob55

    Bigbob55 AC Members

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2005
    Messages:
    74
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Last Seen:
    Mar 3, 2010
    I'm a physics-EE major in college, a very well written article.

    Most relevant things in there, not much that isn't important. A good read.


    "3. for every 50 lbs of decoration substrate,rocks etc etc. you will displace 2.2 gallons of water"

    that may be an average... but if something sinks completely, it will displace whatever volume it has. Remember in physics or chemistry when you wanted to find the volume of an irregularly shaped object you place it in a graduated cylinder or the likes and measure the difference in water level. Weight has almost nothing to do with displacement, provided the object sinks. A fiber-glass decoration which wieghs 5 lbs and displaces .5 cu. ft. will displace the same as a .5 cu. ft. chunk of iron weighing much more.
    (didn't get any exact measurements of that , just pulling some examples from my head for principle)

    BTW, what are your credentials, Joephys?
     
  10. joephys

    joephys AC Members

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2005
    Messages:
    768
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Last Seen:
    Dec 13, 2008
    I'm a physics undergrad student.
     

Share This Page

zoomed.com
tfhmagazine.com
hikariusa.com
aqaimports.com
Store