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The start of my fish room, woot!

Discussion in 'Freshwater Equipment, Products, & DIY' started by shewolfgeo, Aug 29, 2011.

  1. shewolfgeo

    shewolfgeo AC Members

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    It's finally happening. We started Sunday with it. Today my hubby done the second roll of blocks. I'm going in a little bit to get cement to fill the blocks up and maybe we'll get it poured tomorrow. We are starting with a 10x12 building, and going to try to have 3 rolls of tanks and have 3 shelves too. I plan to have them plumbed together. If I do well enough we may build on, or look for me a place to rent and start up a pet shop. Don't know yet we'll have to see.

    Does anyone have any links to a DIY with instructions on a plumbing system without having any drill holes.


    288744_213459102040982_100001306821116_535061_8337500_o.jpg 340497_213815035338722_100001306821116_536392_1549949_o.jpg
     
  2. dudley

    dudley Eheim User

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    I like the idea of the outbuilding for housing fish but I don't know if you are going to be happy with the foundation stability during the winter months. I am not familiar with the weather in eastern Kentucky but in Ohio, the foundation needs to be below the frost line so it isn't heaved out during the cold/warm cycles.

    Also, the cinder blocks aren't stacked properly to provide a secure wall.

    Sorry to be such a negative Nelly but I hate to see you go through all the work only to have to redo it later or have damage to your aquariums.
     
  3. dbosman

    dbosman AC Members

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    Ditto on checking the building code to make sure the building doesn't heave apart.

    For a central filtration system or a central drain system, you want to drill the tanks. Plumbing over flows is asking for either whole tanks over flowing or whole tanks draining to the bottom of the siphon tube.
    Drilling non-tempered glass tanks isn't hard. Pick up broken tanks to practice on first.
    Drilling tempered glass results in thousands of pieces of glass when it shatters.
     
  4. shewolfgeo

    shewolfgeo AC Members

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    What is wrong with the way they are stacked?

    I see homes here with their foundations above ground.. What would be the difference with this?
    We talked about bring in dirt to fill in around the building. Do you think we should go a head with that plan?

    I don't want to drill the tanks, so there isn't a way to get them on a central system?
     
  5. mellowvision

    mellowvision Seafood Lover

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    you can still put them on a central system, drilling just makes them easier.

    I think the reference to the way they are stacked is pointing out that the blocks are not half lapping each other, as they should be. The bigger problem is that they sit directly on uncompacted dirt, so it's possible they will sink in, move, or be heaved by frost. A poured foundation right on the ground is a different thing, and is usually several feet into the ground anyway, if not a full floor deep. You should really look into local codes and practices before wasting all your time and materials.
     
  6. Rbishop

    Rbishop The glistening drop....
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  7. shewolfgeo

    shewolfgeo AC Members

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    Thank you for pointing what they meant by the stacking. I know some of the blocks at the back are as they should, but the ones closer up aren't. I think that is how he had to cut some to fit. Anyways we are going to place steel rods into the blocks and ground before pouring cement. That'll give extra support.

    The ground isn't uncompacted, that dirt around the blocks are from digging into the ground.

    I'll point some of the things out to my hubby tomorrow when we work on it. He's took carpentry in school and should know what he's doing, and we have looked into the local codes here, and seems everything looks fine as far as I can understand them.
     
  8. Mgamer20o0

    Mgamer20o0 BobsTropicalPlants.com
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    look up neos diy over flows out of pvc. its a easy way to put it on a central system with out drilling.
     
  9. shewolfgeo

    shewolfgeo AC Members

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    thank you Mgamer I'll look that up.
     
  10. CWO4GUNNER

    CWO4GUNNER USN/USCG 1974-2004 Weps

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    Looks like a your building a serious fish-room using good materials so you might as well have a good foundation. Along with the poured slab make sure you use plenty of sand beneath the slab as a bed, this way the building will last and if you ever get tired of fish room keeping you can use the building for other practical uses, maybe as a rental.
     
  11. authmal

    authmal Pseudonovice

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    I look at it, and I don't think things look fine. I'm in Arizona, and I know what kind of work my dad had to do just on his foundation for his shed to go up in the back yard. It really looks like this project is going to have a less than optimal level of strength. As mentioned before, a bed of sand is a huge necessity. The thick concrete foundation helps keep everything relatively stable as it shifts on the sand bed. Overlapping blocks all the way around keeps it from starting to buckle (rebar or not) in the slightest, which prevents catastrophic wall failure. With glass/acrylic tanks holding live animals, I'd be inclined to take extra precautions to make sure that everything is done as solidly as possible. Then again, I've been told that everything I've actually gotten around to building (I'm mechanically disinclined---DIY just doesn't interest me in and of itself) is way over engineered (for example, once the bricks were set and mortared well, I'd be inclined to use place rebar in there, and then pour cement, but I haven't built a structure like this so don't know if that'd be the best way to go), and will last, relatively speaking, forever. It also costs more, but I sleep better at night.

    I'm not trying to tell you not to do this, because, if I owned instead of rented, I'd be inclined to make a fish building, myself. I just don't feel confident in the start, but hope that, whether or not you take the advice given by any of us, this project is successful for you.
     
  12. shewolfgeo

    shewolfgeo AC Members

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    Thanks for you all input. I do plan to discuss it with the man about it. We talked some last night about it.
     
  13. GuppyMan

    GuppyMan AC Members

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    :popcorn:
     
  14. GraphicGr8s

    GraphicGr8s AC Members

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    Couple of things on the building. It needs a footer for the block to lay on. The footer needs to be below the frost line. All organic material (grass) needs to be removed. As it starts to decay it will compress and cause the slab to crack. You need to remove the top layer of dirt and get down to a solid surface. Gravel and sand need to be installed and compacted. 2" put down and compacted then another 2" until you meet the thickness required by building code. You may need to get a permit depending upon said building code. Remember, building codes are the minimum. You can always make it better.
     
  15. authmal

    authmal Pseudonovice

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    +1. Best line on building a structure yet!
     
  16. GraphicGr8s

    GraphicGr8s AC Members

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    I've yet to build any structure that just met code. I've never had a red tag and don't intend to. I have however had inspectors compliment me on going above what's required. Best part? I sleep at night knowing my building will be there after a hurricane. Not bad for something I don't make a living at.
     
  17. Khemul

    Khemul Sea Bunny

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    ^ Agreed.

    Plus when you consider how much weight a fish-room often handles (tanks stacked on racks, large tanks, etc crammed into as much space as possible), the building codes may not be enough for 100% worry-free security anyways.
     
  18. chefjamesscott

    chefjamesscott beware the house tiger

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    rebar is well worth the expense in the end products reliability as a foundation
     
  19. dundadundun

    dundadundun ;sup' dog? ;woof and a wwwoof!

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    one thing that hasn't been covered yet. the cinder blocks need to be trimmed only in specific ways. either you make a single square out of the block without cutting into the side wall of the square that remains or you trim a solid capping block. anything done otherwise is simply engineering a fail point into the block. the blocks that are trimmed at the corners there with one long side wall will fail prematurely without a doubt. whether that transfers the fail back into the remaining whole square on that block will depend on an individual basis. i can't say for sure, but given the ground slope and the fact the ground doesn't extend far past the wall, i would assume that almost definitely the corner that's towards us in the pics is going to fail before it's time... especially with the structures intended purpose being to hold tanks full of water. once one block goes, it's only a matter of time until the weight transfer and angle shift caused starts tweaking and decimating the rest of that wall. i would absolutely say the same thing if a sufficient footer were laid with the appropriate drainage/trap rock layer. unfortunately in this case it was not, so it should not be long.
     
  20. GraphicGr8s

    GraphicGr8s AC Members

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    One of the main things is there is no mortar between the blocks. How will you attach the rest of the wall to those blocks? What material will the rest of the walls be?

    3000 psi concrete with a 3.5 - 4" slab will take the weight of the tanks without a problem if done right. The slab needs wire not rebar. Although you can get concrete with nylon reinforcement (Fiber Reinforced Concrete) which avoids a few problems like the wire mesh sinking to the bottom and doing nothing to strengthen or actually coming to the top like part of mine did.
     

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