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  1. #31
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    Rummy-Nose Tetra (Hemigrammus rhodostomus)

    Hemigrammus rhodostomus
    Common Name:
    Rummy-Nose Tetra
    Care Level: moderately difficult
    Size: 2 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.0
    Temperature Range: 26-30 degrees Celsius (78-86° F)
    Origin: River systems of Colombia and Brazil
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    They make a great addition to the community aquarium. It is highly recommended to keep these fish in schools of six or more. The aquarium should be dimly lit with floating plants and driftwood if available. These fish are only to be kept with other smaller fishes such as other tetra species and corydoras.
    Diet: Omnivorous.
    Tank Size for Adult: 15g for a group of 8.
    Narrative:
    This small species gets its common name from its color patter, although its whole head is a red color, not just its nose. The fish has a silver-blue elongated body and a spotted caudal fin. It's not a particularly hardy species, and can be difficult to keep healthy in the aquarium. They should be kept in groups and in soft, slightly acidic water. They are particularly sensitive to high nitrate levels, so frequent water changes and good filtration are required.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!





  2. #32
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    Rummy-Nose Tetra (Petitella georgiae)

    Petitella georgiae
    Common Name: Rummy-Nose Tetra
    Care Level: moderately difficult
    Size: 2 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.0
    Temperature Range: 26-30 degrees Celsius (78-86° F)
    Origin: River systems of Colombia and Brazil
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    They make a great addition to the community aquarium. It is highly recommended to keep these fish in schools of six or more. The aquarium should be dimly lit with floating plants and driftwood if available. These fish are only to be kept with other smaller fishes such as other tetra species and corydoras.
    Diet: Omnivorous.
    Tank Size for Adult: 15g for a group of 8.
    Narrative:
    This small species gets its common name from its color patter, although its whole head is a red color, not just its nose. The fish has a silver-blue elongated body and a spotted caudal fin. It's not a particularly hardy species, and can be difficult to keep healthy in the aquarium. They should be kept in groups and in soft, slightly acidic water. They are particularly sensitive to high nitrate levels, so frequent water changes and good filtration are required.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  3. #33
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    Serpae Tetra (Hyphessobrycon serpae)

    Hyphessobrycon serpae
    Common Name: Serpae Tetra
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 2 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.0
    Temperature Range: 22-27 degrees Celsius (72-79° F)
    Origin: Central Amazon basin
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    They make a great addition to the community aquarium. It is highly recommended to keep these fish in schools of six or more. The aquarium should be dimly lit with floating plants and driftwood if available. These fish are only to be kept with other smaller fishes such as other tetra species and corydoras.

    Avoid keeping these fin-nipping fish with long-finned specimens.
    Diet: Omnivorous.
    Tank Size for Adult: 15g for a group of 8.
    Narrative:
    The Serpae Tetra should be cared for in much the same way as other small, schooling Tetras. It should be kept in groups of at least six, and in a community aquarium with plenty of plants and active tankmates. Feed flake foods.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  4. #34
    Moderator Lupin's Avatar
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    Silver-tipped Tetra (Hasemania nana)

    Hasemania nana
    Common Name: Silver-tipped Tetra
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 2 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.0
    Temperature Range: 22-27 degrees Celsius (72-82° F)
    Origin: Brazil
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    They make a great addition to the community aquarium. It is highly recommended to keep these fish in schools of six or more. The aquarium should be dimly lit with floating plants and driftwood if available. These fish are only to be kept with other smaller fishes such as other tetra species and corydoras.

    Avoid keeping these fish with long-finned specimens as they may try to harass them and even nip their fins.
    Diet: Omnivorous.
    Tank Size for Adult: 20g for a group of 8.
    Narrative:
    A small, attractive fish from Brazil which is gold in body color with silver tips to all its fins, hense its common name. Keep the aquarium stocked with plants and the water neutral in pH and with a good flow. These fish should be kept in groups of five or more. Males are more colorful and slender than females.
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    Last edited by Lupin; 10-09-2008 at 2:49 AM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  5. #35
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    Socolof's Tetra (Gymnocorymbus socolofi)

    Gymnocorymbus socolofi
    Common Name: Socolof's Tetra
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 2 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.0
    Temperature Range: 22-25 degrees Celsius (72-77° F)
    Origin: Meta River in Columbia
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    They make a great addition to the community aquarium. It is highly recommended to keep these fish in schools of six or more. The aquarium should be dimly lit with floating plants and driftwood if available. These fish are only to be kept with other smaller fishes such as other tetra species and corydoras.
    Diet: Omnivorous.
    Tank Size for Adult: 20g for a group of 8.
    Narrative:
    Young specimens are colorful and prefer the company of their own kind, while mature fish tend to fade in color and become loners to a certain extent. These fish can be shy and should be provided with low light levels and floating plants for added security.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  6. #36
    Moderator Lupin's Avatar
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    Redtailed Barracuda (Acestrorhynchus falcatus)

    Acestrorhynchus falcatus
    Common Name: Redtailed Barracuda
    Care Level: moderately difficult
    Size: 10 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.0
    Temperature Range: 24-27 degrees Celsius (75-82° F)
    Origin: South America
    Temperament: aggressive
    Compatible Tankmates:
    Species such as Ctenolucius hujeta (Freshwater Barracuda) and Boulengeralla maculata (Spotted Pike Characin) also make excellent companions, and to see all of these exotic fish in one healthy aquarium in loose schools is a breath-taking sight. Cachorros are aggressive and can keep their own ground, but their frail body cannot support constant entanglements with other aggressive fish such as Oscars or other large cichlids. If you must keep a Cachorro with something just as aggressive make sure that other fish is smaller, but not too small or you will see it inside the Cachorro the next day.
    Diet:
    For food, you will have to feed them live fish (no more than 1/3 the size of the Cachorro) for they will not except anything else. After a big meal, allow a few days of fasting. Cachorros of the same size get along well together, providing security and companionship.
    Tank Size for Adult: 55g for one.
    Narrative:
    The Spotted Cachorro is a member of a specialized group of piscivoric characins which live in the tropical rivers of South America.

    Their appearance is somewhat elongated and tetra-like, with a long snout full of canine teeth. These teeth are nearly transparent and can be easily seen, even when the mouth is fully closed. All fins are triangular and taper to a point, giving the fish an almost stealth-like appearance.

    Cachorros are among the most beautiful of all freshwater fish and easily rival marines in color. The Spotted Cachorro is a good example of this beauty. The tiny, fine scales reflect a dark silver-gold from above which fades in layers to a deep fluorescent blue then to a pink-violet, and finally the belly is a translucent white. The fins have distinct orange-gold markings, and the cadual fin is usually more brilliant with an almost red tang to it. Their is two jet-black ocellatus marks on the fish; one just behind the gill plate, and one just behind the caudal penduncle. These two markings are centered in the middle of the fish, and are perfectly aligned with each other. Overall, this fish is incredibly shiny and can even reflect faint dots of light in the aquarium. When the lay person first sees a Cachorro, the image that comes to mind is a deep sea viperfish.

    The teeth of Cachorros are not used for grasping, holding, lacerating, or chopping prey. They are used to lock a prey item in the mouth, much like the bars of a jail cell. Usually the teeth never penetrate the prey item. Once the prey is secured in the mouth, the Cachorro quickly swallows it, and a most peculiar thing happens; you can see the victim through the slightly transparent sides of the fish. After several hours of digestion, the area where the prey item could be seen, now turns a dark grey. After a day or so, there is no trace of the victim. Cachorros hunt by catching a live morsel in their mouths after a chase which usually doesn't last long.

    Despite the Cachorros amazing hunting and eating abilities, this should not be the prime reason for keeping them, for they can be an expensive hassle. Among the most delicate and sensitive of fish, Cachorros are easily extinguished from life and must be handled with more care than a shard of glass the thickness of a needletip. Therefore you must take special precautions like catching the fish in a plastic bag, and keeping it in utter darkness during times of stress. All specimens are imported, and all have had their share of stress and abuse. Most are suffering from severe scale damage, shredded fins, disease, and many other physical and mental ailments. Once you receive your Cachorro it will have been through hell. You will have to place it in a quarantine or hospital tank in order to nurse it back to health. This means plenty of stress coat, and absolute darkness for about a week. This is done by wrapping a thick sheet of paper around the tank with a peephole which will be made bigger and bigger over time until the Cachorro gets used to external movement, and lighting. Many frown on the idea of buying sick fish and nursing them back to health, but this is the only way to keep Cachorros. By far this is the worst, and trickiest stage of owning these living jewels.

    Once these fish have settled in, and gotten used to aquarium surroundings, you can release them into your main tank. This tank should be of an appropriate size, nothing less than 50 gallons. Keep the water clean and moving, for these are river fish and prefer aerated water. They are sensitive to water changes, so let your water age before introducing it. Neutral to slightly acid water with a temperature between 75 - 82 degrees F. is preferred. For food, you will have to feed them live fish (no more than 1/3 the size of the Cachorro) for they will not except anything else. After a big meal, allow a few days of fasting. Cachorros of the same size get along well together, providing security and companionship. Species such as Ctenolucius hujeta (Freshwater Barracuda) and Boulengeralla maculata (Spotted Pike Characin) also make excellent companions, and to see all of these exotic fish in one healthy aquarium in loose schools is a breath-taking sight. Cachorros are aggressive and can keep their own ground, but their frail body cannot support constant entanglements with other aggressive fish such as Oscars or other large cichlids. If you must keep a Cachorro with something just as aggressive make sure that other fish is smaller, but not too small or you will see it inside the Cachorro the next day.

    There are about a dozen species of Cachorro (Acestrorhynchus), some more colorful than others, but all represent a group of fish that are rare, expensive, sinister, and beautiful all in one. If you achieve this fish, it is living gold. Treat it this way, and it will be an experience in the hobby like none other.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  7. #37
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    Congo Tetra (Phenacogrammus interruptus)

    Scientific Name: Phenacogrammus interruptus
    Common Name: Congo Tetra
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 3.5 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.0
    Temperature Range: 24-27 degrees Celsius (75-82° F)
    Origin: Congo, Africa
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    They make a great addition to the community aquarium. It is highly recommended to keep these fish in schools of six or more. The aquarium should be dimly lit with floating plants and driftwood if available. These fish are only to be kept with other smaller fishes such as other tetra species and corydoras.
    Diet:
    Omnivorous.
    Tank Size for Adult: 30g for a group of 8.
    Narrative:
    Congo tetras are one of the most commonly available tetras from Africa. These fish are very unique and can be compared with even the prettiest tetras of the South American rivers. These fish are open-water swimmers gracing the tank. They are rather boisterous swimmers often dwelling around the surface in search for insects to eat.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by Lupin; 10-15-2008 at 12:16 AM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  8. #38
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    FW Fish Profiles

    Scientific Name: Hemigrammus herbertaxelrodi
    Common Name: Black Neon Tetra
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 2 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.0
    Temperature Range: 24-29 degrees Celsius (75-85° F)
    Origin: South America
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    They make a great addition to the community aquarium. It is highly recommended to keep these fish in schools of six or more. The aquarium should be dimly lit with floating plants and driftwood if available. These fish are only to be kept with other smaller fishes such as other tetra species and corydoras.
    Diet:
    Omnivorous.
    Tank Size for Adult: 20g for a group of 8.
    Narrative:
    Sporting an iridescent silvery-white stripe contrasted by a black stripe beneath it, the Black Neon makes an excellent contrast fish to similiarly shaped and sized tetras such as the Rummy Nose or Neon Tetra.

    Reference: http://freshaquarium.about.com/

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    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  9. #39
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    Columbian Tetra (Hyphessobrycon columbianus)

    Scientific Name: Hyphessobrycon columbianus
    Common Name: Columbian Tetra, Blue and Red Tetra, Neon-backed Tetra, Ghost Neon Tetra
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 2.5 inches
    pH Range: 6.5-7.5
    Temperature Range: 22-27 degrees Celsius (71-83° F)
    Origin: Rio Acandi, Colombia
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    They make a great addition to the community aquarium. It is highly recommended to keep these fish in schools of six or more. The aquarium should be dimly lit with floating plants and driftwood if available. These fish are only to be kept with other smaller fishes such as other tetra species and corydoras.
    Diet:
    A good captive diet for H. columbianus consists of a mixture of balanced flake foods, brine shrimps, bloodworms, and other tiny foodstuff. While Columbian tetras may live for years in a captive environment withiout ever eating anything other than flakes, it is highly recommended supplementing their diet with live/frozen foods as the H. columbianus will never attain their full flush of beauty and color if they eat only flakes.
    Tank Size for Adult: 20g for a group of 8.
    Narrative:
    According to Phil Purser of the Tropical Fish Magazine, the Columbian tetra was first discovered in a few small streams in the Rio Acandi basin of northern Colombia in the early 1990s. It was initially labeled as Hyphessobrycon ecuadoriensis which was a mistake considering to anybody's knowledge, no such species exists in the waters of Ecuador. Some hobbyists suggested the taxonomic stratregy of scrapping the genus Hyphessobrycon altogether and substituting it for Astyanax, which already includes some large tetras such as the blind cave tetra. This proposal was not however accepted. Finally in 2002, Zarske and Gery stepped up and officially described them as Hyphessobrycon columbianus.

    It must be noted however that most distributors do not use scientific names which are more valid than the common names often shared by more than one species. This can be frustrating especially as the customers try to order such fish and end up receiving another species instead much to their dismay.

    Since 2003, the Columbian tetras have grown more popular and large scale breeding projects in captivity have given the wild populations new hope to avoid them from going on the brink of extinction which could happened to species where demand is quite astronomical. The projects since then also lowered demand thus bringing down the selling prices.

    Growing to a maximum adult length of just over 2.5 inches, H. columbianus is a high-backed species. This fish is more laterally flattened than many of its elongate tetra cousins. The dorsal fin is quite tall, even for a tetra, and sweeps back on the dorsal surface. The portion of the back anterior of the dorsal fin is oftentimes raised or humped slightly. Some specimens may have a dorsal fin that is yellow to orange in coloration. The head of H. columbianus tapers to a rounded spearpoint mouth that is lined with surprisingly large teeth and powerful jaws for such a small fish. The large eyes (proportionally larger than most tetra species) suggest these are active predators whose keen vision is helpful both in spotting prey and avoiding predators. With a narrow muscular caudal peduncle and a tall, sharp-edged caudal fin, H. columbianus is a powerful swimmer builty for short bursts of rapid speed. The pectoral fins are also anchored in relatively heavy musculature.

    The dorsum and upper portions of the sides are bathed in a gentle wash of slightly iridescent pastel blue that will, under superior water conditions, extend downward to encompass the entire lateral surface. Particularl striking specimens will also sport a bright blue swath of the coloration streaking down in the middle of the dorsum. The lower flanks of H. columbianus are bright metallic silver, and they may act as mirrors in certain lighting situations, catching the blue from higher on the dorsum and reflecting; thus thuis fish may appear entirely blue.

    The belly and caudal fin of this fish comprise the red half of the equation. Brginning at the anterior edhe of the anal fin (which is elongate in both sexes of the species), a red coloration fringes the rays, and deepens as it progresses backward. A sort of residual pinkish glow low along the body just above the anal fin (again owing to the mirror-like qualities of the scales along the lateral portions of the body) is also evident in some specimens. The caudal fin, however (and even the caudal peduncle in some specimens), is absolutely awash with fiery bright crimson coloration. As is true with most tropical fish species, these colors may be brighter and more vivid when H. columbianus is exposed to superior water conditions. Conversely, they will display washed-out or faded coloration in poor water conditions or when otherwise, stressed.

    These fish are however tough enough to survive relatively wide ranges of pH and temperature, H. columbianus are definitely leading competitors for stocking in the beginner's aquarium, as they provide both beauty and longevity (as long as five years). They will thrive in pH ranging from 6.5 to 7.5 and will tolerate from 71 to 83 degrees Fahrenheit.

    Mid to upper level swimmers, these little tetras are highly active during the daylight hours, and perhaps even more son on moonlit nights. In the wild, H. columbianus often feeds on aquatic insects and larva. To catch these foods, the fish sometimes must leap out of the water or make quick dashes to the top of the water column-acts that may lead to fatal leaps from your tank. Even a covered tank is not absolute security, however, as these little rascals can get quite raucous around feeding time. So take care not to lift a glass lid too high or leave it open when you feed, as it is very easy for a Columbian tetra to jump out of the tank even with you standing right there.

    These fish do best in heavily planted tanks and/or those with ample amouts of driftwoods or other hiding places. In their native environment, predators are all too common and any H. columbianus that cannot find quick cover are easy targets. Lack of driftwood and underwater vegetation will severely stress these fish, as too much open water is not in their porgram for survival in the wild. In fact, a lack of adequate wooden, stone or vegetative cover may also increase the fish's propensity for leaping out of the water; even with a lidded tank that prevents escape, a fish may still be injured if it hits a glass lid on a jump.

    A good captive diet for H. columbianus consists of a mixture of balanced flake foods, brine shrimps, bloodworms, and other tiny foodstuff. While Columbian tetras may live for years in a captive environment withiout ever eating anything other than flakes, it is highly recommended supplementing their diet with live/frozen foods as the H. columbianus will never attain their full flush of beauty and color if they eat only flakes.

    According to Phil Purser, it seems that H. columbianus have attained themselves the reputation of being devious, fin-nipping, and generally riotous members of the tetra family. Some hobbyists tell tales of these fish chasing nad harassing larger barbs, tetras, poeciliids and even catfish. Some even reported outlandish incidents of these fish having a fiery enough temper to actually bully the mouth and lips of larger fish in order to force that fish to spit out food it had jsut eaten. After the harassed fish surrendered its mouthful, the H. columbianus would feed on the spit-out bits.

    These fish can certainly be overwhelming to slow-moving specimens. Mix them with fast moving tetras such as neons, rummynoses, danios and barbs. H. columbianus also mix quite well with most catfishes and loaches. Most H. columbianus simply will not dive to the lowermost depths of the aquarium, and so don't typically cross paths with the bottom-dwelling fish.

    These fish are listed as 'egg-scatterers'. Females are not very picky about deposition sites. In the wild, females will deposit their eggs directly into the currents of the stream, thus scattering them as far as the flowing water will carry them. These manner avoids predation which however is another story if done in captivity.

    Reference: Purser, Phil ; Tropical Fish Hobbyist (Jan 2008).
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    Last edited by Lupin; 10-14-2008 at 11:41 PM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  10. #40
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    Buenos Aires Tetra (Hyphessobrycon caudovittatus)

    Scientific Name: Hyphessobrycon caudovittatus
    Common Name: Buenos Aires Tetra
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 3.5 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.0
    Temperature Range: 24-27 degrees Celsius (75-82° F)
    Origin: La Plata region of South America
    Temperament: moderately peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    Community setups. Keep them away from long finned specimens.
    Diet:
    Omnivorous.
    Tank Size for Adult: 30g for a group of 8.
    Narrative:
    Found in the La Plata region of South America, the Buenos Aires Tetra was first described by Ahl in 1923 as the Hemigrammus caudovittatus. This is one of the more active Tetras and can become a bit of a fin nipper if kept with smaller fish. Growing to about 3 inches in length, the Buenos Aires Tetra has a silver body with a black vertical stripe just behind the gill plate and a black streak at the base of the tail. The fins have a touch of yellow and red coloration, with the males showing more intense colors. This Tetra will eat plants so care should be taken if placed in a Planted Aquarium.

    Tetras are one of the standard fish of the aquarium. Schooling fish, they will do best when there are more than 3 fish in the school. Generally peaceful, they can match up with just about any other type of fish that is not large enough to eat them. While the Tetra might prefer softer, acidic water conditions, most can adapt to a wide range of water parameters. Most are now raised in Florida and SE Asia under conditions very different than their natural habitat in South America.

    As an omnivore, Tetras will eat most aquarium prepared foods, darting to the surface for floating food and picking sinking food out of the water as it descends. They will be more at home if there is a fair amount of cover to dart into if they feel threatened. While it is possible, most Tetras will not spawn in the home aquarium. If they do, several males will chase the female as she scatters the eggs among the plants. Relatively hardy, care should be taken when treating Tetras with parasitic medications.

    References: www.petsolutions.com
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    Last edited by Lupin; 10-09-2008 at 7:48 AM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



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