Page 6 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678910 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 94
  1. #51
    Moderator Lupin's Avatar
    Usergroup
    Moderators
    Real Name
    Paul
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Lupin Information Super Highway/Goldfish Information Super Highway
    Posts
    21,430
    Blog Entries
    7

    Blue Ram (Microgeophagus ramirezi)

    Scientific Name: Microgeophagus ramirezi
    Common Name: Blue Ram
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 2 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.5
    Temperature Range: 24-28 degrees Celsius (76-82° F)
    Origin: Amazon basin, Brazil
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    They make a great addition to the community aquarium. The aquarium should be dimly lit with floating plants and driftwood if available. These fish are only to be kept with other smaller fishes such as other tetra species and corydoras.
    Diet:
    Omnivorous.
    Tank Size for Adult: 10g.
    Narrative:
    Last edited by Lupin; 10-15-2008 at 6:42 AM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!





  2. #52
    Moderator Lupin's Avatar
    Usergroup
    Moderators
    Real Name
    Paul
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Lupin Information Super Highway/Goldfish Information Super Highway
    Posts
    21,430
    Blog Entries
    7

    Bolivian Ram (Microgeophagus altispinosa)

    Scientific Name: Microgeophagus altispinosa
    Common Name: Bolivian Ram
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 3 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.5
    Temperature Range: 22-26 degrees Celsius (74-78° F)
    Origin: Amazon basin, Brazil
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    They make a great addition to the community aquarium. The aquarium should be dimly lit with floating plants and driftwood if available. These fish are only to be kept with other smaller fishes such as other tetra species and corydoras.
    Diet:
    Omnivorous.
    Tank Size for Adult: 10g.
    Narrative:
    Last edited by Lupin; 10-15-2008 at 6:42 AM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  3. #53
    Moderator Lupin's Avatar
    Usergroup
    Moderators
    Real Name
    Paul
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Lupin Information Super Highway/Goldfish Information Super Highway
    Posts
    21,430
    Blog Entries
    7

    Cockatoo Dwarf Cichlid (Apistogramma cacatuiodes)

    Scientific Name: Apistogramma cacatuiodes
    Common Name: Cockatoo Dwarf Cichlid
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 2.5 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.5
    Temperature Range: 24-28 degrees Celsius (76-82° F)
    Origin: Amazon basin, Brazil
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    They make a great addition to the community aquarium. The aquarium should be dimly lit with floating plants and driftwood if available. These fish are only to be kept with other smaller fishes such as other tetra species and corydoras.
    Diet:
    Omnivorous.
    Tank Size for Adult: 10g.
    Narrative:
    Last edited by Lupin; 10-15-2008 at 6:43 AM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  4. #54
    Moderator Lupin's Avatar
    Usergroup
    Moderators
    Real Name
    Paul
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Lupin Information Super Highway/Goldfish Information Super Highway
    Posts
    21,430
    Blog Entries
    7

    Agassiz's Dwarf Cichlid (Apistogramma agassizi)

    Scientific Name: Apistogramma agassizi
    Common Name: Agassiz's Dwarf Cichlid
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 2 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.5
    Temperature Range: 24-28 degrees Celsius (76-82° F)
    Origin: Amazon basin, Brazil
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    They make a great addition to the community aquarium. The aquarium should be dimly lit with floating plants and driftwood if available. These fish are only to be kept with other smaller fishes such as other tetra species and corydoras.
    Diet:
    Omnivorous.
    Tank Size for Adult: 10g.
    Narrative:
    Last edited by Lupin; 10-15-2008 at 6:44 AM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  5. #55
    Moderator Lupin's Avatar
    Usergroup
    Moderators
    Real Name
    Paul
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Lupin Information Super Highway/Goldfish Information Super Highway
    Posts
    21,430
    Blog Entries
    7

    Borell's Dwarf Cichlid (Apistogramma borelli)

    Scientific Name: Apistogramma borelli
    Common Name: Borell's Dwarf Cichlid
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 2 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.5
    Temperature Range: 22-27 degrees Celsius (74-79° F)
    Origin: Amazon basin, Brazil
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    They make a great addition to the community aquarium. The aquarium should be dimly lit with floating plants and driftwood if available. These fish are only to be kept with other smaller fishes such as other tetra species and corydoras.
    Diet:
    Omnivorous.
    Tank Size for Adult: 10g.
    Narrative:
    Last edited by Lupin; 10-15-2008 at 6:45 AM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  6. #56
    Moderator Lupin's Avatar
    Usergroup
    Moderators
    Real Name
    Paul
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Lupin Information Super Highway/Goldfish Information Super Highway
    Posts
    21,430
    Blog Entries
    7

    Bumblebee Oscar (Astronotus orbicularis)

    Scientific Name: Astronotus orbicularis
    Common Name: Bumblebee Oscar
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 12 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.5
    Temperature Range: 24-28 degrees Celsius (76-82° F)
    Origin: South America
    Temperament: moderately aggressive
    Compatible Tankmates:
    Oscars are large, but not usually aggressive fish. Tankmates should be chosen with care. Remember, anything that can fit in an Oscar’s mouth will probably end up eaten within a short period of time. Tankmates should also not be aggressive unless the particular oscar can hold his own. The tank must also be large enough to withstand the bioload placed on it by the added mates. For instance, in a 75g you may be able to have an armored catfish provided you keep up your maintenance and it does not grow larger than 12-13’’.
    Diet:
    Because it is suspected that nutrition deficiencies in Oscars (as well as many other fish) may lead to the dreaded disease, Hole in the Head (HITH), a varied diet is invaluable. A high quality stable, preferable a pellet, should be used. This diet should be supplemented with things like bloodworms and various other live/frozen/freezedried foods. Care should be taken with feeder fish. They should be quarantined at least 3 weeks prior to feeding if bought from the LFS, but a better option may be breeding your own. Fish like guppies can easily be raised for use as the occasional feeder in a 20g tank. Either way, the feeders should be fed a quality diet as well so that they have nutritional value.
    Tank Size for Adult: 75g.
    Narrative:
    Oscars are probably one of the cichlids that get the most attention. As little ones, they inspire many at the local fish store with their wiggly bodies and big puppy-dog eyes. The adults are quick attention getters, and everyone who visits a home with an adult oscar is fascinated. They are one of the most intelligent fish in the hobby, with a great personality to boot. However, many unfortunate Oscars end up in the wrong homes like many of their furry cousins (puppies).

    Oscars are native to the tropical Amazon region in South America, and therefore should be given temperatures typically found in their locality. Temperatures should range between 75F-80F, so a heater will be needed in most situations. However, they seem to have little prefrence in pH or hardness.

    The next part is where you typically see problems in the care of Oscars. Oscars are typically bought small but grow to a large size in a very short time requiring heavy filtration with a big tank to keep their water clean and to keep them happy. Dimensionally wise, Oscars should be give at least a 4’ tank that is at least 18’’ wide. Often, 55g tanks are recommended for Oscars, and, while their volume is acceptable, their dimensions are not. A standard 55g tank is 12’’ wide, shorter than the length most Oscars attain, so these fish would not have much in the way of turn around space. Therefore, they would not be in comfortable conditions; in other words, not thriving. Also, Oscars need regular water changes, at least 50% once a week, although water quality should be monitored so that nitrates do not rise much above 20ppm. If nitrate levels become higher, additional water changes are in order.
    Last edited by Lupin; 10-16-2008 at 8:21 PM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  7. #57
    Moderator Lupin's Avatar
    Usergroup
    Moderators
    Real Name
    Paul
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Lupin Information Super Highway/Goldfish Information Super Highway
    Posts
    21,430
    Blog Entries
    7

    Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus)

    Scientific Name: Astronotus ocellatus
    Common Name: Oscar
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 12 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.5
    Temperature Range: 24-28 degrees Celsius (76-82° F)
    Origin: South America
    Temperament: moderately aggressive
    Compatible Tankmates:
    Oscars are large, but not usually aggressive fish. Tankmates should be chosen with care. Remember, anything that can fit in an Oscar’s mouth will probably end up eaten within a short period of time. Tankmates should also not be aggressive unless the particular oscar can hold his own. The tank must also be large enough to withstand the bioload placed on it by the added mates. For instance, in a 75g you may be able to have an armored catfish provided you keep up your maintenance and it does not grow larger than 12-13’’.
    Diet:
    Because it is suspected that nutrition deficiencies in Oscars (as well as many other fish) may lead to the dreaded disease, Hole in the Head (HITH), a varied diet is invaluable. A high quality stable, preferable a pellet, should be used. This diet should be supplemented with things like bloodworms and various other live/frozen/freezedried foods. Care should be taken with feeder fish. They should be quarantined at least 3 weeks prior to feeding if bought from the LFS, but a better option may be breeding your own. Fish like guppies can easily be raised for use as the occasional feeder in a 20g tank. Either way, the feeders should be fed a quality diet as well so that they have nutritional value.
    Tank Size for Adult: 75g.
    Narrative:
    Oscars are probably one of the cichlids that get the most attention. As little ones, they inspire many at the local fish store with their wiggly bodies and big puppy-dog eyes. The adults are quick attention getters, and everyone who visits a home with an adult oscar is fascinated. They are one of the most intelligent fish in the hobby, with a great personality to boot. However, many unfortunate Oscars end up in the wrong homes like many of their furry cousins (puppies).

    Oscars are native to the tropical Amazon region in South America, and therefore should be given temperatures typically found in their locality. Temperatures should range between 75F-80F, so a heater will be needed in most situations. However, they seem to have little prefrence in pH or hardness.

    The next part is where you typically see problems in the care of Oscars. Oscars are typically bought small but grow to a large size in a very short time requiring heavy filtration with a big tank to keep their water clean and to keep them happy. Dimensionally wise, Oscars should be give at least a 4’ tank that is at least 18’’ wide. Often, 55g tanks are recommended for Oscars, and, while their volume is acceptable, their dimensions are not. A standard 55g tank is 12’’ wide, shorter than the length most Oscars attain, so these fish would not have much in the way of turn around space. Therefore, they would not be in comfortable conditions; in other words, not thriving. Also, Oscars need regular water changes, at least 50% once a week, although water quality should be monitored so that nitrates do not rise much above 20ppm. If nitrate levels become higher, additional water changes are in order.
    Last edited by Lupin; 10-16-2008 at 8:21 PM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  8. #58
    Moderator Lupin's Avatar
    Usergroup
    Moderators
    Real Name
    Paul
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Lupin Information Super Highway/Goldfish Information Super Highway
    Posts
    21,430
    Blog Entries
    7

    Leichardt's Arowana (Scleropages leichardti)

    Scientific Name: Scleropages leichardti
    Common Name: Leichardt's Arowana, Southern Saratoga, Australian Spotted Bonytongue
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 36 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.0
    Temperature Range: 24-30 degrees Celsius (76-86° F)
    Origin: Asia
    Temperament: aggressive
    Compatible Tankmates:
    Compatible tankmates include fish of similar size or even larger such as giant gouramis, peacock bass, datnoids and clown knives.
    Diet:
    Carnivorous.
    Tank Size for Adult: 300g.
    Narrative:
    This species (altogether with the Scleropages jardinii) were once known as barramundis although this practice has been widely discouraged since then due to the confusion it has wrought to the true barramundis (Lates calcarifer). The genus Scleropages means hard leaves which is in reference to their scales.

    Their bodies are very laterally compressed with a large upturned mouth, large scales and barbels on their lower lips. To differentiate between the third species of the genus, the Asian arowana (Scleropages formosus), the number of scales in the lateral line is 32-35 in S. leichardti and S. jardinii while S. formosus has only 21-25. The saratogas are greenish-grey to brown on the back and coppery gold (S. jardinii) or silvery green (S. leichardti) on the flanks. One to three red-orange spots can be found on each scale of S. leichardti, while S. jardini appears to have minimal body spots, the majority of these scale spots appear to have fused creating line markings instead. The fin colours are similar to, or darker than its body colour. Both species have spots present on their fins and tail, with S. leichardti having numerous small spots-in-lines and S. jardini having less but larger spots. The spots may be yellow to orange to red for S. jardini, with spots usually red-orange for S. leichardti. The more northern species (S. jardini) commonly shows a pattern of squiggly lines and or dots on and bordering its gill plate, this is not present (to my knowledge) in the southern species (S. leichardti). Another characteristic of S. jardini is its head which slopes downward from it's back often making it's head look smaller in comparison to it's body. On the other hand S. leichardti shows no sloping head and is generally more level with it's back.
    Last edited by Lupin; 10-15-2008 at 8:02 AM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  9. #59
    Moderator Lupin's Avatar
    Usergroup
    Moderators
    Real Name
    Paul
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Lupin Information Super Highway/Goldfish Information Super Highway
    Posts
    21,430
    Blog Entries
    7

    Asian Arowana (Scleropages formosus)

    Scientific Name: Scleropages formosus
    Common Name: Asian Arowana, Dragon Fish
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 36 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.0
    Temperature Range: 24-30 degrees Celsius (76-86° F)
    Origin: Asia
    Temperament: moderately peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    Compatible tankmates include fish of similar size or even larger such as giant gouramis, peacock bass, datnoids and clown knives.
    Diet:
    Carnivorous.
    Tank Size for Adult: 300g.
    Narrative:
    Asian arowanas are firm favorites in the world of arowanas. They grow to 36 inches in length. Based on wikipedia, Asian arowanas have long bodies; large, elongate pectora fins; dorsal and anal fins located far back on the body; and a much larger caudal fin than that of their South American relative, the silver arowana, Osteoglossum bicirrhosum. The mouth is oblique with a very wide gape. The prominent lower jaw has two barbels at its tip. The gill rakers are stout. Asian arowanas bear teeth on many bones of the mouth, including the jaws, vomer, palatines, pterygoids, parasphenoid, and tongue.

    Their bodies are very laterally compressed with a large upturned mouth, large scales and barbels on their lower lips. To differentiate between the third species of the genus, the Asian arowana (Scleropages formosus), the number of scales in the lateral line is 32-35 in S. leichardti and S. jardinii while S. formosus has only 21-25. The saratogas are greenish-grey to brown on the back and coppery gold (S. jardinii) or silvery green (S. leichardti) on the flanks. One to three red-orange spots can be found on each scale of S. leichardti, while S. jardini appears to have minimal body spots, the majority of these scale spots appear to have fused creating line markings instead. The fin colours are similar to, or darker than its body colour. Both species have spots present on their fins and tail, with S. leichardti having numerous small spots-in-lines and S. jardini having less but larger spots. The spots may be yellow to orange to red for S. jardini, with spots usually red-orange for S. leichardti. The more northern species (S. jardini) commonly shows a pattern of squiggly lines and or dots on and bordering its gill plate, this is not present (to my knowledge) in the southern species (S. leichardti). Another characteristic of S. jardini is its head which slopes downward from it's back often making it's head look smaller in comparison to it's body. On the other hand S. leichardti shows no sloping head and is generally more level with it's back.

    Asian arowana scales are large, cycloid, and, in some varieties, metallic coloured, with a distinctive mosaic pattern of raised ribs. The lateral scales are arranged in horizontal rows numbered from the most ventral (first level) to the most dorsal (fifth level), with dorsal scales designated the sixth level.
    Asian arowanas are distinguished from Australian congenerics S. jardinii and S. leichardti by having fewer (21-26) lateral line scales (versus 32-36 for the Australian species), longer pectoral and pelvic fins, and a longer anterior snout.

    Green arowanas are dark green on the back, silvery or golden green on its sides, and silvery or whitish on its ventral surface, with dark greenish or bluish patches visible through the lateral scales. In mature fish, the top of the eye and the head behind the eye are bright emerald.

    Both grey-tailed and yellow-tailed silver Asian arowanas are dark grey on the back and silver on the sides, with dark ring patches on the lateral scales and a silvery or whitish belly. In yellow-tailed specimens, the fin membranes are yellowish with dark grey rays. In grey-tailed specimens, the fins are uniform dark grey.

    Mature red-tailed golden arowanas have brilliant metallic gold lateral scales, gill covers, bellies, and pectoral and pelvic fin membranes, although the back is dark. In juveniles the areas destined to develop golden colour start out metallic silver. The anal fin and the bottom portion of the caudal fin are light brown to dark red.

    Mature gold crossback arowanas are distinguished from the red-tailed golden arowanas by having metallic gold crossing the back completely. This variety also lacks the reddish fins of the red-tailed golden.

    In mature super red arowanas, the gill covers, lateral scales, and fin membranes of these fishes are metallic red, with the exact hue varying from gold-tinged to deep red. The back is dark brown. In juveniles, the darker the dorsal colouration, the deeper the red will be on maturity.

    The Asian arowanas are listed as endangered by the 2006 IUCN Red List, with the most recent evaluation taking place in 1996. International trade in these fishes is controlled under the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES), under which it was placed on Appendix I, the most restrictive category, in 1975. S. formosus is one of only eight fish species listed on Appendix I. There are a number of registered CITES breeders in Asia and the specimens they produce can be imported into several nations. Other nations restrict or prohibit possession of Asian arowanas; for example, the United States has listed this species under the Endangered Species Act, and therefore it cannot be possessed in that country without a permit.

    Declining habitat is a major threat. For example, Asian arowanas are now uncommon in the Malay Peninsula, where they were once widely distributed, due to environmental destruction. Inclusion in the IUCN Red List was originally based not on biological reasons but on practical ones: though widely distributed throughout southeast Asia, they have been harvested heavily by aquarium collectors. However, habitat loss is likely a greater threat than aquarium collecting.

    There is no recent evaluation of conservation status by IUCN. Additionally, considering the current confusion as to number of species as well as the wide distribution, conservation status needs to be reconsidered. All strains are probably endangered, but some more critically than others.

    The Asian arowana's high value as aquarium fish has impacted its conservation. Its popularity has soared since the late 1970s, and hobbyists may pay thousands of U.S. dollars for one of these animals.

    Beginning in 1989, CITES began allowing Asian arowanas to be traded, provided certain criteria were met, most notably that they were bred in captivity on a fish farm for at least two generations. The first of these farms was in Indonesia. Later, the Singapore government's Agri-food and Veterinary Authority (then called the Primary Production Department) and a local fish exporter collaborated in a captive breeding program. Asian arowanas legally certified by CITES for trade became available from this program in 1994.
    Captive-bred arowanas that are legal for trade under CITES are documented in two ways. First, fish farms provide each buyer with a certificate of authenticity and a birth certificate. Second, each specimen receives an implanted microchip, called a Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT), which identifies individual animals.

    Genetic fingerprinting has been used to assess the genetic diversity of a captive population at a Singapore fish farm in order to improve the management of this species. DNA markers that distinguish among different strains and between sexes have been identified, allowing aquaculturists to identify these characteristics in immature animals.

    Reference:
    http://www.aquariumhobbyist.com/
    http://en.wikipedia.org/
    Last edited by Lupin; 10-15-2008 at 7:31 AM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  10. #60
    Moderator Lupin's Avatar
    Usergroup
    Moderators
    Real Name
    Paul
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Lupin Information Super Highway/Goldfish Information Super Highway
    Posts
    21,430
    Blog Entries
    7

    Jaguar Cichlid (Parachromis managuense)

    Scientific Name: Parachromis managuense
    Common Name: Jaguar Cichlid
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 24 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.0
    Temperature Range: 24-30 degrees Celsius (76-86° F)
    Origin: Central America
    Temperament: aggressive
    Compatible Tankmates:
    Compatible tankmates include fish of similar size or even larger such as giant gouramis, peacock bass, datnoids and clown knives.
    Diet:
    Feeding is not a problem as jaguar cichlids will readily accept commercial foods, krills, mussels and anything else you can provide them.
    Tank Size for Adult: 125g.
    Narrative:
    Jaguar Cichlid has a bad reputation, just like many of the other large predatory cichlids. This reputation is to a large part undeserved, and besides, the positive sides to these fishes more than well make up fore any negative ones. Not to mention that an adult jaguar cichlid is incredibly beautiful.

    This species grows to almost 60 cm (24 inches). Absolute minimum would be 120 gallons per adult although the larger the tank, the better. The aquarium should be decorated so that natural territory boundaries are created. Larger rocks should be placed directly on the bottom of the aquarium since this species digs a lot and can move large stones. Use silica too glue caves and stone formations together so that they don’t fall down.

    This species are relatively undemanding and will become accustomed well to various water conditions. They can be kept with other cichlids from the region as longs as they aren’t too small and can stand up for themselves. This is true for most cichlids species from Central America.

    Sexing jaguar cichlids is usually easy. Females are smaller and rounder in comparison to males. Breeding them in captivity is not that difficult either. The biggest problem however is deciding what has to be done to a resulting large number of fry as each batch can come up with 2000-3000 fry.

    Reference:
    www.aquaticcommunity.com
    Last edited by Lupin; 10-15-2008 at 5:56 PM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



Page 6 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678910 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Illegal Fish Thread
    By rwspear76 in forum General Freshwater
    Replies: 120
    Last Post: 07-06-2014, 7:04 PM
  2. Goldfish Article
    By reptileguy2727 in forum Freshwater
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-30-2009, 6:16 AM
  3. My new fish
    By tankanator in forum Marine Fish Only (FO) / Fish Only With Live Rock (FOWLR)
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 03-08-2009, 4:29 PM
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-23-2008, 11:06 AM
  5. Noob to saltwater
    By sealion in forum General Marine / Newbie
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 10-21-2005, 9:26 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •