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  1. #71
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    Glowlight Tetra (Hemigrammus erythrozona)

    Scientific Name: Hemigrammus erythrozona
    Common Name: Glowlight Tetra
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 1.5 inch
    pH Range: 6.0-7.5
    Temperature Range: 24-28 degrees Celsius (76-80° F)
    Origin: Amazon, Brazil
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    They make a great addition to the community aquarium. It is highly recommended to keep these fish in schools of six or more. The aquarium should be dimly lit with floating plants and driftwood if available. These fish are only to be kept with other smaller fishes such as other tetra species and corydoras.
    Diet:
    Omnivorous.
    Tank Size for Adult: 10g.
    Narrative:
    Keep these little guys in soft, slightly acidic water with plenty of hiding areas through the use of plants and driftwood. They prefer the company of their own kind, and thus should be kept in groups of five or more. Their coloring may be faded in unsuitable water conditions.
    Attachment 113920
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    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!





  2. #72
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    Siamese Fighting Fish (Betta splendens)

    Scientific Name: Betta splendens
    Common Name: Siamese Fighting Fish, Betta
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 2.5 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.5
    Temperature Range: 24-28 degrees Celsius (76-80° F)
    Origin: Mekong basin of Southeast Asia
    Temperament: peaceful to moderately aggressive
    Compatible Tankmates:
    Tankmates are selected based on trial and error as it is not easy to determine how a B. splendens will behave in community setups regardless of their genders. It is however best recommended they be kept with rasboras and tetras that will not be tempted to nip their fins such as glowlight tetras provided there is enough space to avoid the B. splendens from harassing its tankmates due to the cramped quarters. Most bottom dwellers such as corydoras often work.

    Specimens with flamboyant fins such as gouramis and guppies are best avoided as they may be marked by B. splendens as rivals and may only end up being constantly harassed.
    Diet:
    B. splendens are carnivorous by nature relishing insects and small fish in the wild. They can be seen lurking around floating vegetation in shallow ditches while looking for their prey. In captivity, most B. splendens tend to be fussy over foods although meaty foods such as bloodworms are often accepted but do not stick to only one food as a staple as these fish are rather prone to bloat caused by excessive proteins since proteins are not easily digested even by carnivorous specimens themselves. Vegetable matter must also be added to their diet so they can gather fiber that will allow them to excrete wastes without risk of constipation or bloat, both disorders that may prove fatal to the fish's health.
    Tank Size for Adult: 2.5g.
    Narrative:
    The Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens), also known as the "betta fish" or just "betta", is one of the most popular species of freshwater aquarium fish however these are also the ones often largely misinterpreted in terms how they are cared for by their owners.. It is native to the Mekong river basin in Southeast Asia and called pla-kad or pla-kat ("Biting Fish") in its native Thailand.

    B. splendens usually grow to an overall length of about 6.0 cm (~ 2.3 in), though some varieties reach 8.0 cm (3.5 in.) in length. In recent years breeders have been able to create "Giant Bettas" that exceed 8.0 cm (3.5 in.) due to the manipulation of a mutant gene. Although bettas are known for their brilliant colors and large, flowing fins, the natural coloration of B. splendens is a dull green and brown, and the fins of wild specimens are relatively short. However, brilliantly colored and longer finned varieties, such as veiltail, delta, superdelta, and halfmoon have been developed through selective breeding.

    The betta is a member of the Gourami family (family Osphronemidae) of order Perciformes, but was formerly classified among the Anabantidae. Although there are nearly 50 other types of bettas, B. splendens is the most popular species among aquarium hobbyists, particularly in the United States.

    B. splendens are carnivorous by nature relishing insects and small fish in the wild. They can be seen lurking around floating vegetation in shallow ditches while looking for their prey. In captivity, most B. splendens tend to be fussy over foods although meaty foods such as bloodworms are often accepted but do not stick to only one food as a staple as these fish are rather prone to bloat caused by excessive proteins since proteins are not easily digested even by carnivorous specimens themselves. Vegetable matter must also be added to their diet so they can gather fiber that will allow them to excrete wastes without risk of constipation or bloat, both disorders that may prove fatal to the fish's health.

    Tankmates are selected based on trial and error as it is not easy to determine how a B. splendens will behave in community setups regardless of their genders. It is however best recommended they be kept with rasboras and tetras that will not be tempted to nip their fins such as glowlight tetras provided there is enough space to avoid the B. splendens from harassing its tankmates due to the cramped quarters. Most bottom dwellers such as corydoras often work.

    Specimens with flamboyant fins such as gouramis and guppies are best avoided as they may be marked by B. splendens as rivals and may only end up being constantly harassed.

    Natural Habitat and Housing
    An important thing to know when housing a B. splendens is that most metals are lethal, and never should metal decorations be used unless they are marked for this purpose. Copper is especially dangerous. Nonetheless, to keep an individual B. splendens, a minimum tank size of 3 U.S. gallons at least is recommended, if it will be kept in a warm room. Decorations can provide hiding places, especially important when two males are housed in a divided tank, or when the betta is living in a community tank. Every decoration must be free of rough areas or sharp points which can damage the delicate fins of the betta. For this reason, silk rather than plastic plants are recommended. Live plants will improve the water quality. Also, since the betta obtains oxygen from the air, the tank must not be covered with an air-tight lid and the betta must be able to easily reach the surface. (Note that some bettas enjoy leaping out of tanks, so a breathable lid is highly recommended.) If the betta has no access to air, it will suffocate.

    In Canada and the United States, the Betta is sometimes sold in a vase with a plant, with the erroneous claim that the fish can feed on the roots of the plant and that it can survive without changing the water. This is dangerous for the betta in two ways. First, the betta has a labyrinth organ which allows it to take in oxygen from the surface air, similar to the human lung. If the betta can not reach the surface of the water, which can be the case if a plant's roots are covering the surface, the betta will suffocate in a matter of hours. When kept in a small container such as a vase, the fish need frequent water changes, and the container must be kept in a warm room. A larger tank with a heater will provide better living conditions. Wherever the fish is kept, water must be treated with an appropriate water conditioner before use.

    There is a stereotype that in the wild, bettas live in tiny muddy pools, and therefore that it is acceptable to keep them in small tanks, but bowls are usually too small. In reality, bettas live in vast paddies, the puddle myth originating from the fact that during the dry season, the paddies can dry out into small patches of water. It is not a natural state of affairs by any means, and in the wild, fish trapped in such puddles are likely to die in a short period of time when they dry out.

    According to Horst Link who wrote a book specially for bettas, "In my opinion, the natural distribution range is very much smaller than had been supposed until now and is, in fact, restricted to central, western, and northern Thailand...Betta splendens lives in paddy fields and associated ditches, in marshes and flooded grass pits and in the klongs (canals) of the residential parts of towns and villages. At different times of the year, they may be very numerous."

    These fish are largely misunderstood in where they exactly originated. The view that B. splendens often live in mudholes and therefore can be kept in such conditions is not really tenable. The fish will exhibit their full finery in a well-established, balanced aquarium and it is only under such conditions that their keeper will be able to appreciate their beauty at its best.

    To maximize the lifespan of the fish and ensure their well being, they should always be kept in appropriate sized tanks. Bettas ideally should be kept in a filtered tank 10 gallons or more and treated like any other freshwater tank fish. Although these conditions are ideal, with proper care and filtration, a betta can be happily kept in a smaller tank.


    Klong



    Paddy field




    Other good links:
    http://www.ikanpemburu.com/html/field/pontian.htm

    http://www.ikanpemburu.com/html/fiel...itam_last1.htm

    http://www.ikanpemburu.com/html/field/Thailand2.htm

    Sexing and Breeding
    Male bettas are often known to have rather long fins. While this is in fact a common sight, wild male bettas have shorter fins and are even drabber than what they are now. Their short fins allow them to swim across the currents whereas long finned specimens often have problems swimming due to their fin structure. In short, it is not always correct to assume that the fins indicate their sexes. According to Bcaquatics.com, under the head area, where the gills meet, males will have an extra skin that forms under the fish. Females are distinguished by their white dot or the egg tube found between their ventral fins.


    References:
    Link, Horst (1991). Labyrinth Fish: The Bubble Nest Builders, published by Tetra.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/
    http://betta.tasarin.net/aquarium.php
    http://bcaquatics.com/
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    Last edited by Lupin; 11-12-2008 at 7:46 PM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  3. #73
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    Giant Gourami (Osphronemus gorami)

    Scientific Name: Osphronemus gorami
    Common Name: Giant Gourami
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 27 inches +
    pH Range: 6.0-7.5
    Temperature Range: 24-28 degrees Celsius (76-80° F)
    Origin: Asia
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    They are predatory but are often called a gentle giant and can be kept with a large variety of fish species as long as they are large enough to not be eaten.
    Diet:
    Giant gourami are omnivores with an enormous appetite and can grow very quickly. They will eat a wide range of food including but not limited to: flake food, pellet food, feeder fish, fruit and most vegetables.
    Tank Size for Adult: 300g. +
    Narrative:
    There are 3 main species of giant gouramis, giant gourami (Osphronemus gorami), Siamese gourami (Trichogaster pectoralis) and kissing gourami (Helostoma temmincki).

    This beautiful fish can reach sizes of 70cm (28") or more, but in captivity rarely reach sizes over 40cm(16"). They have an oval body shape and their color ranges from gray to white with some spotting or dots. Giant gouramis have a strong personality and very intelligent even to the point of recognition. They have been known to live for 20 years or longer with appropriate care.

    These fascinating fish have a special organ called a labyrinth organ which allows them to breath air from the surface. The labyrinth organ is a suprabranchial accessory formed by vascularized expansion of the epibranchial bone of the first gill arch. The fish are not born with the organ, but develop it gradually.

    Males develop a nuchal hump on the head and have longer and more pointed dorsal and anal fins in contrast to the females which have noticeably more rounded fins.

    Giant gourami are omnivores with an enormous appetite and can grow very quickly. They will eat a wide range of food including but not limited to: flake food, pellet food, feeder fish, fruit and most vegetables.

    They are predatory but are often called a gentle giant and can be kept with a large variety of fish species as long as they are large enough to not be eaten.

    The male will build a bubble nest utilizing plant material just below the water’s surface. Wrapping around the female, the male will collect the eggs into his mouth and place them into the nest. The eggs hatch in 24 hours. The male will jealously guard the nest even becoming aggressive towards the female.

    Due to the large appetite, weekly water changes are recommended. A minimum tank size of 150 to 200 gallons is recommended.

    Some diseases that have been found in or on the giant gourami are Achlya (a fungus infection caused by bacteria infecting the skin and gills producing a toxic substance damaging epithelial cells), Epizootic ulcerative syndrome(EUS) (an infection known as Aphanomyces invadans or Aphanomyces piscicida affecting the kidneys, liver and muscular tissues usually developing red spots or small to large ulcerative lesions on the body), Lernaea (a crustacean parasite infecting the skin and gills), Trypanosoma (an internal parasite found in the blood of giant gourami in Thailand).

    This is a truly wonderful fish and can be kept in a large aquarium with a variety of fishes.The giant gourami makes a great and long lived pet.

    Info supplied by Piggy67
    Last edited by Reefscape; 04-13-2010 at 1:13 PM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
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  4. #74
    Moderator Lupin's Avatar
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    Pearl Gourami (Trichogaster leeri)

    Scientific Name: Trichogaster leeri
    Common Name: Pearl Gourami, Lace Gourami, Mosaic Gourami
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 5 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.5
    Temperature Range: 22-28 degrees Celsius (72-82° F)
    Origin: Thailand, Malaysia, Sumatra, Borneo
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    These fish are generally peaceful and are suitable for community setups.
    Diet:
    Pearl gouramis are omnivorous and will accept anything as these are not finicky eaters. Bloodworms, chopped earthworms, tubifex worms, commercial worms and mealworms can be added to their diet.
    Tank Size for Adult: 15g.
    Narrative:
    Pear gouramis are very popular in the aquarium trade and are considered the most elegant of all the anabantoids due to their pearl-like pattern with a distinct black 'lace' running from its head, and gradually thinning towards the caudal fin. The patterning of this fish has given way to many popular names, such as the lace gourami and the mosaic gourami. The 'lace' refers to the long black line running through the fish's body, whereas 'Mosaic' refers more towards the pearl, or mosaic-like patterning of the body.

    Male specimens of this fish, typical of many gouramis, are generally larger and more colourful than their female counterparts. They exhibit bright orange colouring around the throat region, which at breeding time becomes much brighter and is used to court the female. Males also exhibit somewhat of an orange tinge in their fins, with the exception of the caudal fin. The male also has longer fins, with a pointed dorsal fin and extended anal fin rays.

    A tank of 15 gallons minimum is most recommended although the larger the tank, the better. These fish are suitable for community setups due to their peaceful nature. They are however timid and should therefore not be kept with boisterous and aggressive tankmates. Tank must be regularly maintained as these fish are rather vulnerable to illnesses. The tank can be furnished with plenty of driftwoods and plants, especially floating plants for them to seek refuge.

    The Pearl Gourami is a bubble nest builder that uses plants to help bind together the bubbles. The water level should be reduced to 8 in during spawning, and the temperature should be approximately 28 °C (82 °F) and with a pH of around 7. After spawning both adults should be removed. The eggs hatch after 2 days and the fry become free swimming 3 days later (Ter Morshuizen 2007). When they become free swimming, the fry should be fed infusoria and brine shrimp, and a week later finely ground flakes.

    Reference:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/

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    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  5. #75
    Moderator Lupin's Avatar
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    Dwarf Gourami (Colisa lalia)

    Scientific Name: Colisa lalia
    Common Name: Dwarf Gourami
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 2 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.5
    Temperature Range: 22-28 degrees Celsius (72-82° F)
    Origin: India, Bangladesh
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    These fish are generally peaceful and are suitable for community setups except during spawning season where the male may become overzealous in guarding its bubblenest.
    Diet:
    Dwarf gouramis are omnivorous and will accept anything as these are not finicky eaters. Bloodworms, chopped earthworms, tubifex worms, commercial worms and mealworms can be added to their diet.

    In the wild, these are known to gorge on insects and other tiny creatures as they stalk around the surface. They are also known to graze on algae which some of the aquarists have in fact observed as these were placed in ponds full of floating plants along with green filamentous algae.
    Tank Size for Adult: 5g.
    Narrative:
    The common name fits this fish well, as it grows to a size of only two inches. Males are slightly larger than the females and have a bright orange-red body with turquoise blue vertical stripes that extend into the fins. The dorsal fin of the male is pointed in contrast to the rounded dorsal of the female. Females remain a duller silvery blue-gray color, never achieving the brilling colors of the male. Several color hybrids also exist, Neon, Rainbow, and Red/Blushing.

    Originating from India, West Bengal, Assam, and Bangladesh, the Dwarf Gourami can be found in thickly vegetated waters. They are often found together with other Colisa species. In the river plains of northern India they are one of the most common fish, and are sold dried or as fish meal in many of the markets.

    According to freshaquarium.com, lowering the water level to 6-8 inches and raising the water temperature to 28-30 C will trigger spawning. Vegetation is essential, as males build their bubble nest using plant material, which it binds together with bubbles. Nests are very elaborate and sturdy, reaching several inches across and an inch deep. Limnophila aquatica, Riccia fluitans, Ceratopteris thalictroides, and Vesicularia dubyana, are good choices for the breeding tank. Peat fiber may also be offered as building material.

    Once the nest had been built the male will begin courting the female, usually in the afternoon or evening. He signals his intentions by swimming around the female with flared fins, attempting to draw her to the nest where he will continue his courting display. If the female accepts the male she will begin swimming in circles with the male beneath the bubblenest. When she is ready to spawn she touches the male on either the back or the tail with her mouth.

    Upon this signal the male will embrace the female, turning her first on her side and finally on her back. At this point the female will release approximately five dozen clear eggs, which are immediately fertilized by the male. Most of the eggs will float up into the bubblenest. Eggs that stray are collected by the male and placed in the nest. Once all the eggs are secured in the nest, the pair will spawn again.

    If more than one female is present in the breeding tank, the male may spawn with all of them. The spawning sessions will continue for two to four hours, and produce between 300 and 800 eggs. Upon completion, the male will place a fine layer of bubbles beneath the eggs, assuring that they remain in the bubblenest. At this point the female(s) should be removed from the tank.

    The male will now take sole responsibility for the eggs, aggressively defending the nest and surrounding territory. In twelve to twenty-four hours the fry will hatch, and continue developing within the protection of the bubblenest. After three days they are sufficiently developed to be free swimming.

    The male should be removed from the tank once the fry have left the bubblenest or he may consume the young. Fry should be fed micro-food such as infusoria, rotifers, or commercial fry food for the first week. They can then be fed freshly hatched brine shrimp, and finely ground dry foods.

    Reference:
    http://freshaquarium.about.com/
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
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  6. #76
    Moderator Lupin's Avatar
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    Honey Gourami (Colisa chuna)

    Scientific Name: Colisa chuna
    Common Name: Honey Gourami
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 2 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.5
    Temperature Range: 22-28 degrees Celsius (72-82° F)
    Origin: India, Bangladesh
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    These fish are generally peaceful and are suitable for community setups. They will not however tolerate boisterous and aggressive tankmates and those should therefore be avoided.
    Diet:
    Honey gouramis are omnivorous and will accept anything as these are not finicky eaters. Bloodworms, chopped earthworms, tubifex worms, commercial worms and mealworms can be added to their diet.
    Tank Size for Adult: 5g.
    Narrative:
    The males of the Honey Gourami become deep gold in the breeding period with a dark blue underside. Male specimens of this fish, typical of many Gouramis, are generally more colourful than their female counterparts. They exhibit bright orange colouring around the throat region, which at breeding time becomes much brighter and is used to court the female. Males also exhibit somewhat of an orange tinge in their fins, with the exception of the caudal fin. The male also has longer fins, with a pointed dorsal fin and extended anal fin rays

    A tank of 5 gallons minimum is most recommended although the larger the tank, the better. These fish are suitable for community setups due to their peaceful nature. They are however timid and should therefore not be kept with boisterous and aggressive tankmates. Tank must be regularly maintained as these fish are rather vulnerable to illnesses. The tank can be furnished with plenty of driftwoods and plants, especially floating plants for them to seek refuge.
    Last edited by Lupin; 10-21-2008 at 6:46 AM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
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    But I will love you until the end of time!



  7. #77
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    Moonlight Gourami (Trichogaster microlepis)

    Scientific Name: Trichogaster microlepis
    Common Name: Moonlight Gourami
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 5 inches
    pH Range: 6.0-7.5
    Temperature Range: 22-28 degrees Celsius (72-82° F)
    Origin: Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    These fish are generally peaceful and are suitable for community setups. They will not however tolerate boisterous and aggressive tankmates and those should therefore be avoided.
    Diet:
    Moonlight gouramis are omnivorous and will accept anything as these are not finicky eaters. Bloodworms, chopped earthworms, tubifex worms, commercial worms and mealworms can be added to their diet.
    Tank Size for Adult: 15g.
    Narrative:

    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  8. #78
    Global Moderator Dangerdoll's Avatar
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    Cherry Barb - Puntius titteya

    Cherry Barb (Puntius titteya)

    Puntius titteya
    Common name: Cherry Barb
    Care Level: easy
    Size: 2 inches
    pH range: 6.0-8.0
    Temperature range: 74 - 81 °F (23 - 27 °C).
    Origin: Tropical fish belonging to the spotted barb genus of the Cyprinidae family. It is native to Sri Lanka, and introduced populations have become established in Mexico and Colombia.
    Temperament: peaceful, mostly. Males tend to get aggressive with their own kind when spawning.
    Compatible Tankmates: Rasboras and other tetras do well with cherries.

    Diet: Flakes, along withMeaty foods such as bloodworms, earthworms, are appreciated greatly.
    Tank Size for Adult: Due to their small size but active nature, a tank as small as a 20 could support a school of these fish
    Narrative:
    One of the more peaceful of the barbs, they do prefer a heavily planted tank. With a tank heavily planted, their spawning never ceases to end. They are quite small fish, usually maxing out at 2 inches maximum size for females, smaller for males. Females will be a deeper darker red while the females will retain a redish top, a gold line through her center horizontally and a whitish bottom. They are egglayers which scatter their eggs amongst the gravel and plants. The will eat the eggs and/or fry if there is not enough cover to keep them hidden. A successful plant in which they seem to do their most successful spawning would be mosses. Java mosses have held high successes in home aquaria.

    The are a lively fish, oftentimes the males will dart after one another when spawning is present and they may tend to get nippy toward long flowing finned fish such as bettas. The aren't tight schoolers as they'd rather keep close to the planted areas of the tank however, they will seem to keep close to the tightly schooling rasboras if sharing a tank with them.
    Quote Originally Posted by Reefscape View Post
    Completly agree, DD......and yes, that hurt me too say



  9. #79
    resident boozehound Sploke's Avatar
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    Profile - Paratilapia polleni

    [pictures to come)


    Scientific Name: Paratilapia polleni
    Common Name: Marakely, Black Diamond Cichlid
    Care Level: Medium
    Size: 28cm TL (11")
    pH Range: 7.0-7.5
    Temperature Range: 24-28°C (75-82°F)
    Origin: Madagascar
    Temperament: moderately aggressive
    Compatible Tankmates: Does well with other cichlids of similar aggression levels, and community fish large enough not to be eaten.
    Diet: Omnivorous; captive-bred specimens will feed readily on prepared foods. In the wild, mostly piscivorous, will also feed on insects and aquatic invertebrates.
    Tank Size for Adult: 55gal
    Narrative: These are gorgeous, yet not commonly seen cichlids. Similar in habit to many other medium to large cichlids, P. polleni does well in large community tanks with other fish, but will attempt to swallow anything small enough to fit in its mouth. They tend to lurk in shadows rather than out in the open, so cover of heavy driftwood is an important part of this fish's habitat. Tends to largely ignore plants. Males show a sleeker body shape, rounder forehead and longer trailers on dorsal and anal fins than females, and are also generally larger. This species is also called P. bleekeri, and P. sp. "small spot". The large spotted version is also recognized as P. bleekeri, and many believe they should be classified as separate species.


    References:
    http://www.cichlidae.com/article.php?id=76
    http://www.fishbase.us/summary/Speci...ry.php?id=8786
    -Matt

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    LEGALIZE AROWANA



  10. #80
    Senior Member Dixon's Avatar
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    Datnioides pulcher




    Scientific Name: Datnioides pulcher
    Common Name: Siamese Tiger fish, Wide bar tiger, ST
    Care Level: Moderate
    Size: 24 inches
    pH Range: 6.5-7.5
    Temperature Range: 24-28 degrees Celsius (75-82° F)
    Origin: Asia, Mekong and Chao Phraya basins
    Temperament: Can be aggressive toward others of the same species, they will usually be OK with other large fish, although this is not always the case.
    Compatible Tankmates: Other large growing fish.
    Diet: Carnivorous.
    Tank Size for Adult: 180g.
    Narrative: Distinguishable by its regular colour pattern consisting of 4 or 5 regular and broad bars on body; bar 1 from nape through opercle onto thoracic region and across ventral surface of the body; bar 2 from base of dorsal spines 2-5 to slightly in front of anal fin origin; bar 3 starts at base of dorsal spine 9 to base of dorsal ray 2, and ends at base of anal rays 2-6; bar 4 on posterior half of caudal peduncle. (Ref. Fishbase.org)
    A large tank with plenty open swimming space is required for D pulcher, although as this fish grows slowly a smaller tank can be used as a grow out. As these fish grow large a 6x2x2 tank is recommended but bigger is always better. A large amount of filtration and decent water change schedule is a must with these fish as they prefer good water quality. Feeding D pulcher when small and newly introduced to the aquarium can be a challenge and live foods may only be taken. Feeding habits can be changed, and with perseverance foods like prawn, whitebait (silversides), beef heart, earthworms and even pellets can be accepted and a varied diet is always best.
    Last edited by Dixon; 04-22-2009 at 3:44 PM.



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