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  1. #1
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    FW Inverts Profiles

    For FW inverts...

    [ picture ]

    Scientific Name:
    Common Names:
    Care Level:
    Adult Size:
    pH Range:
    Temperature Range: (F/C)
    Origin/Habitat:
    Temperament/Behavior:
    Compatible Tank mates:
    Diet:
    Tank Size For Adult:
    Narrative:

    References/Links:


    Photo by Lupin.

    Scientific Name: Pomacea canaliculata
    Common Names: Golden Apple Snail, Channel Snail
    Care Level: easy
    Adult Size: 3 inches
    pH Range: 7.0-8.0
    Temperature Range: 18-28 degrees Celsius (64-82 degrees Fahrenheit)
    Origin: South America
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    They can be kept in most community setups but do not attempt to keep them with fish that have a voracious appetite for invertebrates, particularly loaches of the botiine genus and puffers. Be very careful when selecting their tankmates. Most fish are tempted to nip their eyes and antennae. While the snails have the ability to regenerate their lost body parts, it is not advisable to push through your plans to risk them with possibly nippy fish. They will only be stressed out severely from constant harassments.

    If the fish can tolerate hard alkaline water aside from being passive over the snails, they may be your best options as most specimens from soft acidic waters become more prone to finrot once the water chemistry is altered.
    Diet:
    These snails are voracious consumers devouring almost all types of plants including duckweeds (Lemna minor) hence they are not suitable for planted community setups. Juveniles in particular tend to be more avid plant consumers. Any food will be consumed quite enthusiastically as these are not the least bit fussy about their foods at all.

    Meaty foods have been known to increase their cannibalistic tendencies especially when fed with a weakened or dead snail. They have also been recorded thus far to even eat live fish when a prey least expects it although this is a very rare and unusual case but be particularly selective when choosing their fish tankmates. Bottom dwellers with fleshy bodies such as serpentine loaches are best avoided to prevent any possible predation from happening.
    Tank Size For Adult: A 5g per adult.
    Narrative:
    Pomacea canaliculata are snails that are part of the Pomacea genus (formerly Ampullaridae). These are often referred to as golden apple snails or simply canas. These snails originated from South America ranging from Southeast Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay and Bolivia. These are now also widespread across Asia due to their ability to survive various environmental conditions. They have established populations in Hawaii and Florida.

    The shell of this species has 5-6 whorls seperated by a deep suture which is less than 90 in angle. The shell color can vary from yellow and green to brown with our without dark spiral bands. They have a thick operculum which can be retracted into the shell opening. The snail body can vary from yellow to brown to nearly black with yellow spots on the siphon.

    These snails are sexual and therefore need a partner in order to breed. They are not sexually matured until they reach 2.5 cm in size. It is not easy to distinguish their sexes however if you can remove the snail out of the water and observe closely the right side of its body, you may find the penis sheath in there. This will tell you the snail is a male. Another way is when they copulate. Males are often found clinging at the right side of their fellow snails. You will know by then the one clinging is a male. Males will attempt to copulate with anyone so the snail they may be clinging could be a male or a female.

    They lay clutches of hot pink eggs above the waterline containing 200-600 eggs. The eggs must be kept in warm humid conditions. Removing them from their location involves using a razor blade without crushing them. Wait for 24 hours for the eggs to harden before removing them. Place the clutch in damp paper towel or filter floss afterwards. The eggs will become lighter as time progresses. You can tell when the eggs are about to hatch when they break easily as you touch or attempt to move them. The hatchlings may need a little assistance in this case. You can gently swish the eggs in the water so they fall off to the bottom although most hatchlings are able to find their way to the water. The hatchlings will remain hidden from view most of the time so be patient. They will eventually show up. They can be identified by the pink dot coloring their sutures which eventually disappears as they grow. They will grow rapidly at this point.

    Feeding them is not a problem as they are not at all fussy with foods. They eat all types of plant matter and are banned from interstate shipping and distribution. This species is more resistant to lower temperatures than most apple snails. They are most active during the night. Use calcium enriched foods to ensure their shells will not erode. The use of calcium pills, liquid calcium, cuttlefish bones and eggshells is widely encouraged for healthy shell conditions. The pH must be maintained no lower than 7.0 as acidic water tends to erode the shells thus leaving the snail more susceptible to health issues, predatory attacks and even death.

    They can be kept in most community setups but do not attempt to keep them with fish that have a voracious appetite for invertebrates, particularly loaches of the botiine genus and puffers. Be very careful when selecting their tankmates. Most fish are tempted to nip their eyes and antennae. While the snails have the ability to regenerate their lost body parts, it is not advisable to push through your plans to risk them with possibly nippy fish. They will only be stressed out severely from constant harassments.

    If the fish can tolerate hard alkaline water aside from being passive over the snails, they may be your best options as most specimens from soft acidic waters become more prone to finrot once the water chemistry is altered.
    References:
    www.applesnail.net
    Last edited by Lupin; 03-26-2009 at 6:00 PM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
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    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!





  2. #2
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    Scientific Name: Neocaridina heteropoda var. yellow
    Common Names: Yellow shrimp
    Care Level: easy
    Adult Size: 1-1.2 inch
    pH Range: 6.5-8.0, ideal range 7.2-7.6
    Temperature Range: (F/C) 59-82 F
    Origin:wild form from southern China
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates: should not be housed with other neocaridina as they will cross-breed
    Diet: Omnivorous
    Tank Size For Adult: 10 adults per gallon
    Lifespan: 18months-2 years
    Narrative: These shrimp are easy to breed as the young are miniature versions of the adults and there are no larvael stages. They are omnivorous and will eat a wide range of algaes and prepared fish foods. Protect young shrimp from the filter intake with a sponge or media bag or use sponge filtration. Females develop bright yellow saddle or visible eggs which then become fertilized. The eggs are carried under the swimmerettes for approximately 20 days. Each female can produce from 15-40 young from each gestational period. Female shrimp are slightly larger than males and more vibrant in color. Dwarf shrimp do best in species specific tanks as the young are susceptible to predation through almost any fish. In densely planted tanks it may work to keep them with small peaceful species of community fish.

    References/Links:
    Last edited by Lupin; 10-09-2008 at 6:56 AM.



  3. #3
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    [ picture ]

    Scientific Name: Neocaridina heteropoda var. red
    Common Names: Cherry Shrimp
    Care Level: Easy
    Adult Size: 3/4 inch to 1 inch
    pH Range: 6.5-8.0, 7.2-7.6 being ideal
    Temperature Range: (F/C) 70-80 F
    Origin: Southern China, Taiwan
    Temperament: Peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates: Should not be housed with other neocaridina to prevent cross breeding.
    Diet: Ominivorous
    Tank Size For Adult: 10 adults per gallon
    Lifespan: 18months-2 years
    Narrative:
    An excellent starter shrimp, the Red Cherry shrimp is a ready breeder. Females are slightly larger and more opaque than males. They develop a visible saddle at sexual maturity. Once their eggs are fertilized, it takes about 21 days for 20-40 young to hatch into miniature versions of the adults. Sponge filtration or a covered intake is recommended to protect the young. Cherry shrimp will eat algae as well as any prepared fish foods. Shrimp only tanks are preferred as they are the natural prey of most fish.

    References/Links:
    Last edited by Lupin; 10-09-2008 at 6:57 AM.



  4. #4
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    [ picture ]

    Scientific Name: Neocaridina cf. zhangjiajiensis var. blue
    Common Names: Blue pearl shrimp
    Care Level: Easy
    Adult Size: 1- 1.25 inch
    pH Range: 6.5-80, 7.2-7.6 being ideal
    Temperature Range: (F/C) 70-80 F
    Origin: Inline bred in Germany
    Temperament: Peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates: Should not be housed with other neocaridina to prevent cross-breeding
    Diet: Omnivorous
    Tank Size For Adult: 10 adults per gallon
    Lifespan: 18 months-2 years
    Narrative: Females are slightly larger and more brilliant in coloration than males. They develop a visible brown saddle at sexual maturity. They carry fertilized eggs under their swimmerettes for approximately 2 weeks before 15-40 young hatch as miniature versions of the adults. It is recommended to use sponge filtration or a covered intake to protect the young. Shrimp do best in a species tank as they are the natural prey of most shrimp. The shrimp will eat a wide range of algaes as well as most prepared fish foods.

    References/Links:
    Last edited by Lupin; 10-09-2008 at 6:58 AM.



  5. #5
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    [ picture ]

    Scientific Name: Neocaridina zhangjiajiensis var. white
    Common Names: Snowball shrimp
    Care Level: Easy
    Adult Size: .75inch to 1.25 inch
    pH Range: 6.5-8.0, with 7.2-7.6 being ideal
    Temperature Range: (F/C) 70-80F
    Origin: Inline bred in Germany
    Temperament: Peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates: Should not be housed with other neocaridina to prevent cross-breeding
    Diet: Omnivorous
    Tank Size For Adult: 10 adults per gallon
    Lifespan: 18 months to 2 years
    Narrative:
    Females are slightly larger and more vibrant than males and develop a visible white "saddle" when sexually mature. The eggs are brilliant white and carried in the swimmerettes for approximately 2 weeks before hatching into miniature versions of the adults. Sponge filtration or a covered intake is recommended to protect juvenile shrimp. They are best kept in an invert specific tank as they are the natural prey of most shrimp. They will readily eat most algaes and prepared fish foods.

    References/Links:
    Last edited by Lupin; 10-09-2008 at 6:59 AM.



  6. #6
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    [ picture ]

    Scientific Name: Caridina sp. var green
    Common Names: Green shrimp, Dark Green shrimp
    Care Level: Easy
    Adult Size: 1- 1.25 inch
    pH Range: 7.0-8.2
    Temperature Range: (F/C) 72-82F
    Origin: India
    Temperament: Peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates: Should not be housed with other caridina species to prevent cross-breeding
    Diet: Omnivorous
    Tank Size For Adult: 10 adults per gallon
    Lifespan: 18 months-2 years
    Narrative: Females are larger and more vividly colored than males. The green can vary in intensity. It is a prolific shrimp producing 20-40 young from each gestational period. The young can vary in color from reddish to brown to green but all achieve a green coloration at sexual maturity. In my experience, they are slower growing than most neocaridina shrimp. They require either sponge filtration or a covered intake to protect the young which are born as miniature versions of the adults. A vibrant and active shrimp which is a good addition to a planted tank. As with other dwarf shrimp, an invert specific tank is best as they are the natural prey of most fish. They will readily eat most algae and prepared fish foods.

    References/Links:
    Last edited by Lupin; 10-09-2008 at 7:00 AM.



  7. #7
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    [ picture ]

    Scientific Name: Caridina cf. cantonensis "tiger"
    Common Names: Tiger shrimp
    Care Level: Easy to moderate
    Adult Size: 1.25-1.75 inch
    pH Range: 6.0-7.2
    Temperature Range: (F/C) 68-75 F
    Origin: SouthEast Asia
    Temperament: Peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates: These should not be housed with other caridina to prevent cross-breeding
    Diet: Omnivorous
    Tank Size For Adult: 10 adults per gallon
    Lifespan: 18 months- 2 years
    Narrative:
    These are a hardy and prolific shrimp when kept in ideal tank conditions. They require cooler waters with soft and acidic water in order to reproduce readily and have the young survive. An ideal pH is around 6.6. A higher pH will result in a shortened lifespan with less young surviving. The striping can vary in color from reddish to blue to black. Young are born as miniature versions of the adults so its important to use either sponge filtration or have the intake covered adequately. They will eat a wide range of algaes as well as prepared fish foods. Females are slightly larger than males.

    References/Links:
    Last edited by Lupin; 10-09-2008 at 7:01 AM.



  8. #8
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    Photo by msjinkzd.

    Scientific Name: Pomacea diffusa (formerly Pomacea bridgesii)
    Common Names: Golden Mystery Snail, Brig, Golden Apple Snail, Mystery Snail
    Care Level: easy
    Adult Size: 2.5 inches
    pH Range: 7.0-8.0
    Temperature Range: 18-27 degrees Celsius (64-81 degrees Fahrenheit)
    Origin: South America
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    They can be kept in most community setups but do not attempt to keep them with fish that have a voracious appetite for invertebrates, particularly loaches of the botiine genus and puffers. Be very careful when selecting their tankmates. Most fish are tempted to nip their eyes and antennae. While the snails have the ability to regenerate their lost body parts, it is not advisable to push through your plans to risk them with possibly nippy fish. They will only be stressed out severely from constant harassments.

    If the fish can tolerate hard alkaline water aside from being passive over the snails, they may be your best options as most specimens from soft acidic waters become more prone to finrot once the water chemistry is altered.
    Diet:
    These snails prefer dead and decaying plant parts rather than the healthy plant specimens which make them perfectly suited for planted tank setups. They will appreciate fish foods and vegetable matter in their diet. Use calcium enriched foods to ensure their shells will not erode. The use of calcium pills, liquid calcium, cuttlefish bones, plaster of Paris pucks and eggshells is widely encouraged for healthy shell conditions. The pH must be maintained no lower than 7.0 as acidic water tends to erode the shells thus leaving the snail more susceptible to health issues, predatory attacks and even death.
    Tank Size For Adult: A 2.5g per adult.
    Narrative:
    Pomacea diffusa are snails that are part of the Pomacea genus (formerly Ampullaridae). These are often referred to as golden apple snails, golden mystery snails, mystery snails or simply brigs. These snails originated from South America ranging from Southeast Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay and Bolivia.

    The shell of this species has about 5 to 6 whorls. The most obvious characteristics of the shell are the square shoulders (flat at the top of the whorls) and almost 90 sutures. The shell opening (aperture) is large and oval, the umbilicus is large and deep. They have a thick operculum which can be retracted into the shell opening. There are quite a lot of shell color variations ranging from burgundy, ivory, gold, blue and many more.

    These snails are sexual and therefore need a partner in order to breed. They are not sexually matured until they reach 2.5 cm in size. It is not easy to distinguish their sexes however if you can remove the snail out of the water and observe closely the right side of its body, you may find the penis sheath in there. This will tell you the snail is a male. Another way is when they copulate. Males are often found clinging at the right side of their fellow snails. You will know by then the one clinging is a male. Males will attempt to copulate with anyone regardless of their sexes so the snail they may be clinging could be a male or a female.

    They lay clutches of peachy to white eggs above the waterline containing 50-300 eggs. The eggs must be kept in warm humid conditions. Removing them from their location involves using a razor blade without crushing them. Wait for 24 hours for the eggs to harden before removing them. Place the clutch in a damp paper towel or filter floss afterwards. The eggs will become lighter as time progresses. You can tell when the eggs are about to hatch when they break easily as you touch or attempt to move them. The hatchlings may need a little assistance in this case. You can gently swish the eggs in the water so they fall off to the bottom although most hatchlings are able to eat their way out and go to the water. The hatchlings will remain hidden from view most of the time so be patient. They will eventually show up. They are colorless but the colors should eventually darken after a week. They will grow rapidly at this point. It has been suggested however the hatchlings be confined in breeder nets or hatchery for awhile until they reach pea size. This way, they will not have to compete with the larger snails for foods. Most hatchlings die from starvation as they look around for food.

    These snails prefer dead and decaying plant parts rather than the healthy plant specimens which make them perfectly suited for planted tank setups. They will appreciate fish foods and vegetable matter in their diet. Use calcium enriched foods to ensure their shells will not erode. The use of calcium pills, liquid calcium, cuttlefish bones, plaster of Paris pucks and eggshells is widely encouraged for healthy shell conditions. The pH must be maintained no lower than 7.0 as acidic water tends to erode the shells thus leaving the snail more susceptible to health issues, predatory attacks and even death.

    They can be kept in most community setups but do not attempt to keep them with fish that have a voracious appetite for invertebrates, particularly loaches of the botiine genus and puffers. Be very careful when selecting their tankmates. Most fish are tempted to nip their eyes and antennae. While the snails have the ability to regenerate their lost body parts, it is not advisable to push through your plans to risk them with possibly nippy fish. They will only be stressed out severely from constant harassments.

    If the fish can tolerate hard alkaline water aside from being passive over the snails, they may be your best options as most specimens from soft acidic waters become more prone to finrot once the water chemistry is altered.
    References: www.applesnail.net
    Last edited by Lupin; 03-26-2009 at 7:25 PM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  9. #9
    Moderator Lupin's Avatar
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    Photo by Sounguru.

    Scientific Name: Clea helena; Anentome helena
    Common Names: Assassin Snail
    Care Level: easy
    Adult Size: 1"
    pH Range: 6.0-8.2
    Temperature Range: (F/C) 74-82 degrees Fahrenheit (22-27 degrees Celsius)
    Origin: Sulawesi, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia; some species are widespread in Africa
    Temperament: Peaceful
    Compatible Tankmates:
    Shrimp and most fish will absolutely be fine with Clea helena however it is not advisable to mix them with any other snail species intended as pets rather than foods. Despite the fact, they may not attempt to eat the larger snails such as apple snails, the risk of predation is still there. Assassin snails work together to bring down larger prey such as mystery snails (Pomacea diffusa).

    There have been few reports of assassin snails taking down shrimp but most of these are plainly hearsay for lack of evidence however one Aquariacentral.com member, rich_one has observed his green shrimp latching on the assassin snail and the assassin snail, without warning, latched on the shrimp and stabbed it to death. He observed it eating the shrimp alive. Though no picture has been presented in his excitement to discover the new behavior, the details he had provided, have their merits. Despite this incident, it is still very rare for assassin snails to turn their predatory instincts towards shrimp.
    Diet: Carnivorous. These snails are predatory in nature preferring to eat other snails particularly those smaller than them. Meaty foods such as bloodworms are good alternatives in the absence of snail supply.
    Tank Size For Adult: 5 adults per 2.5g
    Lifespan: There have been claims they can live for 1.5-5 years.
    Narrative:
    Assassins will eat an average of one snail per day, half to half again their size. They do have a preference for snails like pouch snails (Physas sp.) where the body is easier to get into and there is no door for the victim to pull back and hide behind. They have been seen tracking like a cruise missile all the way across the tank to get the pouch snails and pass up the slower MTS (Malaysian trumpet snail-Melania sp.) to chase down the pouch snail and devour it.

    Based on the observation of William Burt (Sounguru), assassins will neither attack nor eat their own kind even if they die. They will eat other snails however that are dead and this was confirmed when an assassin took down a larger MTS and could not finish the meal about 4 hours later. Another assassin snail came across the remains and finished it off. Assassin snails are also known to work in groups in order to bring down their larger prey.

    Assassins feed by first grasping the prey and then inserting a feeding tube into the snail's shell and basically liquifying the snail and sucking out the remains. They will also actively hunt, laying in ambush of another snail. It was observed that they proceed to bury themselves to a point where all that stuck out of the sand is their little trunk appendage. They would then wait until a snail of suitable size comes close, then motor out of the sand and grab the snail. This type of behavior led to possible conclusions, the first being that the trunk is used for smelling and hunting down prey, and another that they do come from both rocky, muddy or sandy substrate areas. It has been observed that once the assassin snails are introduced into a tank, the MTS and pouch snails begin to climb the glass walls in their efforts to evade the predation of the assassin snails.

    Assassin snails are sexual and therefore need a partner in order to reproduce. There is a theory however that indicates females are usually larger than males and males are found to latch on the females. There have been rumors that assassin snails are livebearers however this myth has been squashed with photos showing eggs laid among plant stalks and other decorations which later on hatch into baby assassin snails. Assassin snails are known to lay an average of 2 or more eggs in a day. This appears to vary especially with the environmental conditions. They have been found to prefer large stiff plants, plant roots and pebble/sand substrate as their egg laying bases. It has been theorized that those mediums can bear their weight more than anything else.

    There have been several claims that assassin snails will continue laying eggs as long as there is an abundance of meaty foods. This has not been confirmed yet and at some point, an experiment for this will be conducted. Basically, in conclusion of this point, whether, they will continue to lay as long as there is a steady meaty food source, this has not been totally confirmed but the theory has its merits. In the absence of meaty foods, it has been reported that they will survive on regular fish food.

    Now as far as hatching and growth go, it seems both of these are a rather long process. With only one egg per case, they will not become as invasive in your tanks as some other species, but they could become the only species in a hurry. It takes three to four weeks for the eggs to hatch. It will take a long while before you eventually see the young assassin snails. Their growth is very slow compared to others. There have been claims that it takes them to four to eight to reach full grown size. Baby assassin snails will rarely appear from hiding and will not show up until they are about half an inch in size.

    Here are some pictures of the snails emerging from the egg sacs.


    One baby coming out.


    Baby assassin snail on its way to hunt down prey.


    Below, you will see pictures of an assassin snail about a week old. You can already see the bands and the elephant-like nose. When they are first born, it is difficult to tell hem apart from MTS or pouch snail without magnification. The best way to do this is watch the snail if it moves along smoothly it is either a pouch snail or an assassin snail. If it moves along by pulling itself, it is a MTS. Now to identify it from the pouch snail, you need to get it side on and you will see that its shell is held higher than that of a PS.







    WARNING ABOUT BABY ASSASSINS

    The babies apparently move to new territories in the wild kind of like baby spiders. They have been seen climbing to a high point hang from some kind of string or slime trail and get caught up in the current to float around the tank for several minutes before coming to rest. It has been theorized that to disperse in the wild, they must do the same thing to float down stream. So using a sponge over your filter intake or a sponge filter is a must if you want your babes to survive.


    References/Links:
    Permission to obtain the complete details and images has been granted by the original author, William S. Burt (Sounguru).
    Last edited by Lupin; 02-23-2009 at 5:11 AM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



  10. #10
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    Photo by pik01.

    Scientific Name: Clithon corona
    Common Names: Horned Nerite Snail
    Care Level: easy
    Adult Size: 0.6 inch
    pH Range: 7.6-8.0
    Temperature Range: 64-81 degrees Fahrenheit (18-27 degrees Celsius)
    Origin: Philippines
    Temperament: peaceful
    Compatible Tank mates:
    Horned nerite snails will work almost perfectly with all community setups provided the water conditions required are met. They should not however be mixed with fish that will constantly harass or harm them to death such as loaches of the botiine genus and puffers.
    Diet: Like other nerites, horned nerites prefer algae and biofilm as their primary foods. Supplementing them with anything else is next to impossible as they will not take anything easily although there have been occasional reports of them found to be eaten carrot slices, cucumber slices, peas and snail jello with pea flavor.
    Tank Size For Adult: 1 per 2.5g. Note however that this is more of a guideline than actual stocking. Nerites excrete a lot of wastes for their size and it is advisable that the filtration be maximized when considering these snails.
    Lifespan: 5-10 years

    Narrative:
    Horned nerite snails (Clithon corona) have been reported to be found in Palawan, Dumaguete City, Dipolog City and Cebu City of the Philippines. Colors vary depending on the sources where they were obtained from.

    Horned nerite snail is named after its spines found at the rear part of its shell. The spikes are meant as a defense mechanism from predators and can inflict cuts if not handled carefully. Nerites are extremely docile animals that will not bother anything at all.

    Horned nerites grow no more than an inch size in shell diameter. Their shells are very thick and these are great calcium absorbers requiring lots of calcium to maintain sturdy shells. They will eat nothing but algae and biofilm. Many people have reported unsuccessful attempts to get them to eat other foods such as the popular homemade snail jello with the possible exception of those with peas mixed which have been reported to attract the snail into eating them. It is therefore very important that these snails be introduced in a well established tank where it will meet its adequate food supply.

    Horned nerite snails are efficient algae eaters and are often suggested as "clean up crews" for several different biotopes. Due to their spikes, they can easily deter most predators however it is not advisable to mix them with fish that will potentially harass or harm them to death. Care must be taken when trying to keep these snails. They will not do well in soft acidic water or water inadequate or lacking in calcium as this will cause shell erosion which will eventually leave the snail prone to damages and other health issues.

    Breeding is next to impossible. Though the snails will lay trails of white eggs around the tank, none of the eggs will remain viable enough to hatch into velligers (larva) as the eggs require brackish conditions in order to hatch. The larva themselves need microalgae and phytoplanktons in order to survive to snail stage.

    References/Links:
    Last edited by Lupin; 03-26-2009 at 6:10 PM.
    Hakuna Matata! What a wonderful phrase!
    Storm clouds may gather,
    And stars may collide,
    But I will love you until the end of time!



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