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  1. #51
    Senior Member Lillyan's Avatar
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    Med foods just came in! Gave them some and most fish went for it. Hopefully this works and I won't loose any more fish!
    Lillyan





  2. #52
    Senior Member platytudes's Avatar
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    Nicole
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    Good, good! Keep us posted.



  3. #53
    Senior Member Lillyan's Avatar
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    Separated my Betta, not sure he is eating otherwise. How do you feed bottom dwellers the medicated flakes....?
    Lillyan



  4. #54
    Senior Member dixienut's Avatar
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    i got this email from dr. wells he sell this on ebay also privately just email him his paypal is different from this one,.. i bought prazi and febendozole, both from him hes a vet, in florida,.. and his dosages are great a bit long but you'll find what you need,..



    From: Arthur Wells <drarthurwells@hotmail.com>
    Subject: Tapewormer powder order: Pet care products and dosing instructions
    To: dixienut99@yahoo.com
    Date: Saturday, March 27, 2010, 10:10 PM


    #yiv1814818699 .ExternalClass #ecxyiv1627979284 .ecxExternalClass #ecxecxyiv779522020 .ecxecxhmmessage P{padding:0px;}#yiv1814818699 .ExternalClass #ecxyiv1627979284 .ecxExternalClass #ecxecxyiv779522020 .ecxecxhmmessage{font-size:10pt;font-family:Verdana;}
    Sending you 15000 MG of tapewormer and a 150 MG scoop Monday.


    1000 MG of tapewormer (equal to almost 7 of the packs) for $3, or 3000 MG for $6 (equal to 15 of the packs), with a 150 MG scoop - best choice for a small number of pets.

    One level 150 MG scoop of tapewormer is for 40 to 60 pounds of pets.

    Take one level scoop and dump on plate

    separate into 4 near equal piles

    use each for one 10 to 15 pound pet - may put in juicy food for hungry pet or mix with fatty gravy (or thin pancake syrup) and liquid inject per directions below. Use half of one of these four packs for a 5 to 7.5 pound pet. Doesn't matter how much liquid you use - what matters is how much powder you add to it, but don't add too much liquid to a dose since you want to get it all in the mouth for swallowing in one try.

    Example:




    Q: Ok, I have 2 large dogs, each about 80 lbs, a huge cat between 15-20 lbs (I think about 17... maybe 18 lbs), and a small cat that is only around 8 or 9 pounds. We know for sure that one dog and one cat have tapeworms because we see white worm pieces in their poop so we're assuming that ALL the animals have it. Based on 80+80+20+10 lbs of weight for a total 190 lbs, how much of this stuff would I need?
    A: Three of the 150 MG packs for $1 each, or better get 3000 MG powder (for 6 treatments over time instead of one using three packs) with a 150 MG scoop for $6. Take the three packs (or three level 150 MG scoops from the bulk powder) and put in 3 ML of light pancake syrup or oil-based juice (use the syringe I can include to measure 3 MLs). Mix powder well. For each dog give 1 3/10 ML in food or mouth. for the large cat give 3/10 of a ML and give 1/10 of a ML to the small cat - best to mouth inject with cats.

    Use LIS for $4 for pets 5 months old or older (if not nurisng and not pregnant) - see below. LIS in the 4 ounce size treats 1200 pounds of pets twice - now and repeat in two weeks. Use LIS every three months, and tapewormer when needed, does all worms. Using only one type of flea control will allow fleas to adapt and be able to live - the flea control used will stop working. Best to rotate different flea controls. Rotate my LIS, Advantage type, and Frontline type of flea control - use one each month in order. All three for $21. Add Nylar when fleas are bad (summer) for $9 more or $30 total. These prices are discounted so no further discounts (below) apply. Shipping is $4.
    Get one million MG of Fenbendazole for $240 shipped ($250 to Canada). Great for horse owners.
    Direct orders get a 10 percent discount if paid by check or with cash transfer (not credit or debit card) from paypal. Save my email address for future ordering.

    To order:
    1. Tell me what you want and add $4 flat rate shipping charge.
    2. Pay me direct and not through Ebay to get a discount from total price with shipping included, and if paying by methods 1 or 2 below.

    Payment instructions below - I refund if you use paypal but not exactly as instructed below:


    1. For any order, send a check or cash to Arthur M Wells, 9845 SW 153 Lane, Dunnellon, Fl 34432. I ship when I get your check, or from trusted customers, as soon as you order and email me that you will send a check. Take a

    10 percent discount from the total order price.

    2. For orders $60 or more only (with the discount of 10 percent), send money by paypal by using e check, bank transfer, or cash balance (no credit card and no debit card allowed here) by paypal to drarthurwells@embarQmail.com (Note: spelled with a Q and not a G) as personal 'money sent' (then click 'other') and not as commercial for 'goods' or 'services' - that saves me paypal fees. I refund if these instructions are not followed. Do not list what you are ordering in the paypal note, but do list your address or email your address to me - paypal does not show your address on this personal account. I will refund if you don't follow these instructions. You can't repay unless you have sufficient cash funds to cover both the original payment and repayment amounts since paypal doesn't refund until it gets your first payment out of your bank days later, even though I put in the refund minutes after you made the first payment - you could be charged by your bank for insufficent funds unless you delay the second payment until after the first comes back from paypal.


    3. If you use a debit or credit card and pay with paypal, pay to drarthurwells@hotmail.com but you can't take the 10 percent discount with this payment method.


    Save my Email address for future direct orders.


    General observations:

    Most pets only need: (1) some praziquantel at times (for tapeworms), (2) flea control (can eliminate tapeworms), and (3) heartworm control. Tapeworms cause the last problem of all the worms and some people don’t bother treating them. Most people don’t want these in their pets though, for best health.

    Puppies and kittens need frequent round and hook worm treatment as they grow up but usually not as adults (if they were treated earlier or escaped getting round/hook worms).

    LIS or Ivermectin for skin is a liquid that kills fleas as well as heartworms and most intestinal worms (except tapeworms). It is safe for all cats and most dog breeds and is the best all round wormer yet inexpensive.

    Do not use the same flea control all the time - rotate a different one each month. Flea control should be alternated each month since using the same one every month breeds resistant fleas - do liquid Ivermectin for skin one month (all cats and most dogs), Advantage the next month (all pets), then Frontline the next month (all pets except rabbits), then Ivermectin for skin the next month, and so on. Also use Nylar each month, with the above, for best flea control.


    Better to overdose some, than underdose - doses given are minimum doses, except in the case of high dose Ivermectin where accurate dosing is recommended without overdosing.
    Store all products in the dark (closed cabinet or drawer, or in light proof wrapping), at room temp.

    Needle-less syringe included with all liquid wormer and flea control products. For flea control, dose on bare skin spots along spinal line. Syringe is marked in 1/10 ML lines up to 3 ML. Syringe also provided free with powder products if you request. Before use of syringe, suck a drop of two of vegetable oil and work inside the syringe, then expell, then draw a dose of LIS and apply. When finished dosing pets suck water repeatedly in the syringe and expell, to wash out inside of syringe, then suck a drop of two of vegetable oil and work inside the syringe, then expell, and then store syringe.


    Table of contents for sections of text below:

    1. Introduction: Basic and safe worming for all pets.
    2. Praziquantel for tapeworm control - a must for tapeworms carried by fleas
    3. Flea control
    4. Ivermectin for heartworm control, round/hook/lung worms, mange and ear mites
    5. Safeguard (Fenbendazole) - for round/hook/lung worms and a must for Giardia
    6. Horse Treatment

    7. What is coccidiosis?
    8. General Comments.

    1. Introduction: Basic and safe worming for all pets:

    (1) LWS - Liquid wormer small : For just $3 you can get a 30 ML bottle of liquid Pyrantel Pamoate for hookworms and roundworms, which includes a 3 ML needle-less syringe (marked in 1/10 of a ML lines) for injecting in the mouth (good for cats) or you can just squirt on food. The 30 ML bottle is enough to treat up to 300 pounds of adult dogs with one dose now and a repeat dose in 3 weeks (puppies and kittens require higher doses per pound and repeated doses every 2 to 3 weeks until 4 to 5 months old). Measure doses with the syringe provided down to 1/10 of a ML (a CC is the same as a ML). Just add this liquid to food or inject in back of mouth with the needle-less syringe (keeping closed mouth pointing up while pet swallows). This hook and round wormer treatment is absolutely essential for most puppies and kittens (can use this if at least 2 weeks old), since many of them have round or hook worms.

    (2) LWL - Liquid wormer large: For $9 get a 120 ML bottle instead of the 30 ML bottle - four times as much for just three times the price.

    Dosing Pyrantel Pamoate (liquid wormer):

    Adult dogs (8 months or older) get one ML per each 15 to 20 pound of their weight, 3 ML for a 45 to 60 pound dog, 1 1/2 ML for a 22 to 30 pound dog, 3/4 ML for a 12 to 15 pound dog, 1/2 ML for a 8 to 10 pound dog, or 1/5 ML for a 3 to 4 pound dog. For larger dogs, add the pounds and doses above - a 125 pound dog gets two 3 ML doses plus one 1/4 ML dose. Repeat this dose in 3 weeks.

    Puppies: Start liquid wormer as early as 2 weeks and dose at one ML per 7 pounds (1/5 ML per 1.4 pounds) of weight , and repeat this every 2 to 3 weeks until 4 to 5 months old.

    Cats and kittens: Start liquid wormer when 3 weeks old and dose at one ML per 5.5 pounds (1/5 ML per 1.1 pounds) of weight, and repeat this every 3 weeks until 4 to 5 months old.

    Horses: Use one ML per 14 pounds, sprinkled in dry food.

    You should worm a healthy pregnant mother with Pyrantel Pamoate (and even continue worming the nursing mother), then start worming the puppies at 2 and kittens at 3 weeks of age. You should repeat this on puppies every 2 weeks, and with kittens every three weeks, until the last dose at 4 months old, then do at 5 months old. You should then worm once or twice a year with Pyrantel Pamoate, and follow-up 3 weeks later, or as needed.

    The following should not be used with Pyrantel Pamoate as they increase side effects potential: levamisole, morantel, piperazine, fenbendazole, organophosphate insecticides, and diethylcabamazine (a heartworm preventive).


    If you want to treat tapeworms as well as round and hook worms you can order Praziquantel in 150 MG packs or bulk powder with a150 MG scoop measure, or you can buy this tapewormer pre-mixed with the above liquid wormer for a liquid combo wormer treatment. This is for pets 4 weeks or older. Praziquantel has a bitter taste, and while dogs will eat it in their food, many cats will not. For cats a liquid form of Praziquantel can be injected in their mouth.

    (3) LCWS - Liquid combo wormer small: This liquid wormer will do tapeworms for only $6. It can be used in dogs 8 months and older as the initial treatment for round/hook as well as tapeworms then followed up in three weeks with the liquid wormer (LWS and LWL above) without tapewormer in it. Dose both at one ML per 15 to 20 pounds of dog weight. In this liquid combo wormer you get 700 MG of Praziquantel powder for tapeworms premixed in 15 ML (1/2 ounce) of liquid Pyrantel Pamoate. It can be used one time for tapeworms, dosing at one ML per 15 to 20 pounds of pet weight, to eliminate tapeworms in dogs, cats, kittens, puppies, and other animals. However if used in combo treatment for round/hook worms as well as tapeworms, then you not only need to follow it up in three weeks with the LWS or LWL above, you need to dose it differently with puppies, cats and kittens than you do with dogs 8 months or older. Dosing:

    All pets: For tapeworms only, in one treatment, dose at one ML per 15 to 20 pounds of weight (1/5 ML per 1 1/2 to 2 pounds of weight).

    Dogs (8 months and older): Dose as the initial treatment for round/hook as well as tapeworms at one ML per 15 to 20 pounds of dog weight (1/5 ML per 1 1/2 to 2 pounds of dog weight), then followed up in three weeks using the same dose with the liquid wormer (LWS and LWL above) without tapewormer in it (or you can use the combo wormer again since the additional tapeworming does no harm).

    Puppies (4 weeks are older): If signs of tapeworms are seen in stools then add one part of the liquid combo wormer (with tapewormer in Pyrantel Pamoate) to two parts of the liquid wormer (Pyrantel Pamoate with no tapewormer in it), and dose at one ML per 7 pounds of weight (1/5 ML per 1.4 pounds of weight). Follow up in two to three weeks with liquid wormer at one ML per 7 pounds (1/5 ML per 1.4 pounds of weight).

    Cats and kittens (4 weeks or older): If signs of tapeworms are seen in stools, then add one part of the liquid combo wormer (with tapewormer in Pyrantel Pamoate) to two and a half parts of the liquid wormer (Pyrantel Pamoate with no tapewormer in it), and dose at one ML per 5.5 pounds of weight (1/5 ML per 1.1 pounds of weight). Follow up in two to three weeks with liquid wormer at one ML per 5.5 pounds (1/5 ML per 1.1 pounds of weight).

    Some may wish to buy the LWS and LCWS for $9. This is good for dogs since you can use the LCWS first, then in 3 weeks use the LWS in follow-up, dosing both at one ML per 20 pounds.

    (4) LCWL for $9 is for 30 ML – equal to two of the 15 ML LCWS.

    (5) LCWG for $30 is for 120 ML (4 ounces) – equal to four of the LCWL.

    One smart option is to buy Pyrantel Pamoate for round/hook worms - either the LWS ($3 for 30 ML) or LWL ($9 for 120 ML) - then buy Praziquantel for tapeworms, then make your own combo wormer. To make a combo wormer to treat tapeworms, as well as round and hook worms, you can pour one 150 MG pack of Praziquantel powder into a cup (buy this pack of tapewormer for $1, or buy bulk Praziquantel and use one 150 MG level scoop measure), then add the liquid wormer as follows:

    Dogs - add 3.5 ML and dose at one ML per 16 to 20 pounds
    Puppies – add 9 ML and dose at one ML per 6.75 pounds
    Cats and kittens – add 11 ML and dose at one ML per 5.5 pounds


    You have to mix really well as the powder does not mix well in the water-based liquid. Mix, let settle for a while, mix again, etc. Then draw the proper dose in the syringe and give this dose to treat round/hook/tapeworms. Then follow up in 3 weeks to finish the round/hook worm treatment at the same dose above but without adding the tapewormer powder to the liquid wormer.

    The most cost-effective option is to buy bulk powder Praziquantel, which includes a 150 MG measuring a scoop: 1000 MG is $3, 3000 MG is $6, 5000 MG is $9 and larger quantities are cheaper per MG.


    Don't use Praziquantel until at least 4 weeks or older, and this usually is not needed before 3 months old.After 6 months old, you should worm twice a twice a year with Pyrantel Pamoate, or as needed, once and then repeat in 3 weeks. Older adults have less problems with round/hook worms than young ones, once treatment has occurred. Pyrantel Pamoate is a good choice for puppies and adults (if only round and hook worms exist), as well as for horses (same dose as for pets) and other animals. Liquid pyrantel pamoate in humans for pinworms (itchy rectum may be present) - once by mouth, at one ML (50 MG of Pyrantel Pamoate) per 10 pounds of human weight then repeat this dose in two weeks.

    Cats can be hard to dose. Because of the large dose needed you usually have to dose three or more small doses in a row. Draw 1/5 ML of the liquid wormer per 1.1 pounds of the cat (one ML for a 5.5 pound cat) into syringe. While someone else holds and strokes the pet to relax it, open the mouth of the cat and squirt deep in back of mouth while quickly closing (and holding closed) the pet's mouth (nose pointed up) so the cat will swallow all of it. If you don't inject deep, so the cat swallows all of it, then the liquid in the mouth will cause the cat to salivate and spit it out. This liquid can also be mixed in the pet's food.


    The following should not be used simultaneously with Pyrantel Pamoate as they increase side effects potential: levamisole, morantel, piperazine, fenbedazole, organophosphate insecticides, and diethylcabamazine (a heartworm preventive).

    Drontal for cats does not have Fenbental like the Drontal for dogs does - Fenbendazole is not approved for cats in the USA but is in Europe and elsewhere and is widely used in the USA with cats. So, my liquid combo wormer is the same as Drontal for cats.

    For more info on worms http://www.lbah.com/intpar.htm#whips

    2. Praziquantel Tapeworm Control:


    Praziquantel is dosed at a minimum of 11 MG per five pet pounds (horses need a minimum of 7 MG per 10 horse pounds), and primarily used against parasites known as 'Cestodes' (tapeworms). The common tapeworm of dogs and cats, dipyllidium caninum, carried by fleas, is the main problem, though Praziquantel is also effective against less common types of tapeworms such as Taenia species and the more dangerous Mesocestoides species. Praziquantel is also effective against flukes. Many other tapewormers do not kill all these types (Ivermectin, Pyrantel Pamoate, and Safeguard or Fenbendazole will not work for the common pet tapeworm):


    Packs: You can purchase 150 MG packs described below - one pack for $1. Each pack treats 40 to 60 pounds of pets. The packs can be divided or combined to measure the dose, then mix the powder in moist food. I will provide a syringe-with-no-needle (free if you request it when you order, and free with all liquid products without any such request, otherwise it is $1.50 total with shipping included, if shipped by itself later).


    Bulk powder: The cheapest way to buy Praziquantel is in bulk powder as described below - much more for your money and includes a 150 MG scoop to measure doses - one level scoop for 40 to 60 pounds of pets. Divide a level 150 MG scoop pile into eight near equal piles, each one for 5 to 7.5 pet pounds in food. Mix 3.5 ML liquid (oil based gravy or thin pancake syrup) with one level 150 MG scoop and dose at one ML per 17 pounds for all pets.

    The Praziquantel powder in packs is individually measured to 150 MG, inside a small plastic baggie. Cut the top of the bag off and dump the powder on a plate - may be divided into small equal piles, or combined in the piles, to measure a dose. Use a whole 150 MG pack (or one level 150 MG scoop from the bulk powder) for a 40 to 60 pound dog, or divide for smaller pets.

    Measuring doses with the 150 MG pack or one level 150 MG scoop (provided with the bulk powder): Open the pack over a plate (dark solid color plate makes it easier to see the powder) or flat piece of foil. Some contents will spill upon opening, so the plate or foil will capture it all. Bunch into one pile and then separate this into two equal piles, to yield two 75 MG packs for two 20 to 30 pound pets. Save one for later use (wrap in a piece of foil) and label it 75 MG tapewormer. Or separate the remaining 75 MG pile into two equal piles of 37.5 MG each for two 10 to 15 pound pets, or divide these two piles in half to yield four piles of 19 MG each for four 5 to 7.5 pound pets. O you could add some from one 19 MG pile to another pile to make two unequal piles where one is twice as big as the other. Give the larger pile to a 7 to 10 pound pet and the smaller pile to the 3 to 5 pound pet. Remember you could overdose by many times without serious effects. It is easy to separate a pile into two roughly equal ones, and even big errors are of no safety concern - very safe and very effective treatment. You can sprinkle on a small piece of meat then fold over to keep the contents inside and press together to embed the powder into the meat, then place in pet's mouth. Or just sprinkle on food that only the pet treated will eat (and eat all of).


    You can also use a syringe (I provide free if you request when you order), and mix the 150 MG powder in 3.5 ML of either oil-based meat/fish juice or in a thin pancake syrup, mix well, then draw one ML per 17 pet pounds and inject with my needle-less syringe into the pet's mouth (see next paragraph). Or for adult dogs, mix one pack in 3.5 ML of my round/hook worm liquid wormer, and dose at one ML per 17 pounds, to treat a combo of tape/round/hook worms (puppies mix 9 ML of liquid wormer and dose at one ML per 7 pounds, but with cats/kittens mix 11 ML of liquid wormer to one 150 MG pack (or level 150 MG scoop) of tapewormer and dose at one ML per 5.5 pounds - then do a three week follow-up treatment in all cases of combo use with the same dose of liquid wormer alone with no praziquantel mixed in.

    Liquid dosing is particularly good for cats who may not eat the dosed food: Cats can be hard to dose. Draw measured dose into syringe. While someone else holds and strokes the pet to relax it, open the mouth of the cat (or dog) and squirt deep in back of mouth while quickly closing (and holding closed) the pet's mouth (nose pointed up) so the cat (or dog) will swallow all of it. If you don't inject deep, so the cat swallows all of it, then the liquid in the mouth will cause the cat to salivate and spit it out. This liquid can also be mixed in the pet's food. Be sure to request a free syringe with the powder you order - a syringe is automatically supplied with all liquid products.

    Tapewormer powder dose for dog or cats: 2.2 MG (minimum) per pound of pet weight. Use the guide below for minimum doses:

    12.5 MG dose of Praziquantel for 5.5 pounds of pet weight

    15 MG for 7 pounds of pet weight
    25 MG for 11 pounds of pet weight

    31 MG for 14 pounds
    35 MG for 15 pounds
    50 MG for 23 pounds

    62 MG for 28 pounds
    75 MG for 34 pounds
    100 MG for 45 pounds
    125 MG for 57 pounds
    150 MG level in a pack, or in a scoop supplied with bulk powder, for 40 to 60 pet pounds


    160 MG for 72 pounds
    225 MG for 103 pounds
    275 MG for 125 pounds
    325 MG for 147 pounds
    375 MG for 170 pounds


    For horses use .7 of a MG per pound of horse or a 150 MG scoop (or a 150 MG pack) per 210 pounds of horse).

    Low price bulk powder orders of pure Praziquantel, to add to aquariums and ponds to treat fish tapeworms and flukes or for those with many pets or horses: You can get bulk powder for of 1000 MG for $3, with a 150 MG scoop for measuring doses. Order 3000 MG for $6, 5,000 MG for $9, 10,000 MG for $16, or 15,000 MG for $22, 30,000 MG for $40, or 40,000 MG or more for $1.25 per 1000 MG . I will include a 150 MG measuring dispenser with any of these bulk powder orders as an accurate way to measure doses. This level scoop measure of 150 MG is for 40 to 60 pounds of pets (or 210 pounds of horse weight), but can be divided for smaller pets or combined for larger pets.

    To dose: A 150 MG level scoop of packed powder will measure heavier than 150 MG- measure level scoop of loose powder so: turn the closed bottle or pack upside down to loosen up the powder (which may have packed down), then turn it right side up. Repeat. Then open the bottle or pack top over a plate or piece of paper, to capture spillage. Dip the 150 MG scoop in the bulk powder to get a level amount (do not pack the powder into the scoop) by scraping off the excess into the bottle or pack (or plate or paper). This level amount will be 150 MG, enough to dose 40 to 60 pounds of pets. Divide or combine to get smaller or larger doses, using the dose needed above.


    Horses: Use 70 MG of Praziquantel per 100 pounds of horse - 150 MG of Praziquantel per 210 pounds of horse. Mix in syrup or molasses and stir in oats or other feed, then make sure the horse eats all of it.

    Fish (not for fish to be used for human consumption): Use 9 MG of tapewormer per 1 gallon (or 3.75 liters) of tank water. You could give ten times that amount and not harm your fish or plants. Most people just mix powder in a container of water drawn from the aquarium and then pour back slowly into the tank in a place of a circulating stream (or distribute at many places on the surface in the tank). It is a good idea to first remove debris from the tank, and remove the activated charcoal from the water filter (or it might absorb some of the Praziquantel). Some people empty Praziquantel into a cup and mix with some Vodka or Ethanol to make it water soluble, but this doesn't seem necessary. Repeat this in 5 to 7 days where flukes and not just tapeworms are treated. After treatment is over, return charcoal to the filter. Some people like to drain the water and refill, after the first treatment and before the second. Treat again when you add more new fish that might bring tapeworms or flukes into the tank.



    Humans: Praziquantel tapwewormer is used in humans: at 20 mg/kg (9 MG per pound) bodyweight three times a day as a one day treatment, at intervals of not less than 4 hours and not more than 6 hours. The recommended dose for clonorchiasis and opisthorchiasis is: 25 mg/kg (11.36 MG per pound) bodyweight three times a day as a one day treatment, at intervals of not less than 4 hours and not more than 6 hours.


    3. Flea Control:

    Washing with Dawn detergent removes and helps kill fleas - use in a bath a week before you use any flea control. I sell a Frontline type (marked F and has the same active ingredients as Frontline), Advantage type (marked A and has the same active ingredients as Advantage) for flea control, or LIS (high dose liquid Ivermectin for skin as a blue-green liquid, $4 for 30 ML or $12 for 120 ML). For the Frontline type - I sell 30 ML (CC) for $10 a bottle or $30 for 120 ML bottle (includes a new syringe as a measuring dispenser), which is enough for many treatments (takes only one ML = one CC for every 25 pounds of pet, per month). Advantage is $10 for 30 ML or $30 for 120 ML (one ML per 30 pounds of pet). Where fleas are bad, Nylar ($10 for 30 ML) should be used each month in combination with the above rotation of flea controls. Dispenser marked as ML but a ML is the same as a CC. Although this contains the exact same active ingredient as Frontline, it has a different liquid base. It works well on my pets though, and others who use it report good results. There have been some reports from people in some areas that there is flea resistance to a flea control used alone for long periods. This is possible as treatment resistance to anything can develop over many generations. You need to alternate Frontline, Advantage, and LIS (if used) types. I alternate between liquid Ivermectin (high dose) for skin (at least every two weeks - twice in one month) in the first month, Advantage (for 30 day use) in the second month, and Frontline (for 30 day use) in the third month, and use Nylar each month, where this controls for fleas, heartworms and roundworms - see precautions on using high dose Ivermectin. Test Frontline on rabbits with half dose then gradually increase to 1/4 ML per 10 pounds. Stop if reactions observed.


    Nylar ($10 for 30 ML) is an insect growth inhibitor. You mix one ounce in three quarts of water and spray the pet's (including cats) environment. This works well for heavy flea infestation - mix 1 OZ. Nylar with three quarts of water and spray 1000 Sq. Ft. wherever pets live - carpet, furniture, outdoor quarters, etc. Using Nylar at one ML per 20 pounds on the pet's skin spots as a flea control, along with my Frontline flea control, is the equivalent of Frontline Plus (the Plus means that an insect growth inhibitor has been added to the Frontline), as maximally effective. I use it each month on my dogs at the dose of one ML per 20 pounds, on bare skin drops along the spinal line. Bathe pets in Dawn dishwasher detergent to kill fleas, but do so a few days before you apply spot skin flea treatments and never bathe within three weeks after applying spot treatments.

    For ticks: Apply some liquid soap to a cotton ball. Cover the tick with the soap-soaked cotton ball and swab it for a few seconds (15-20), the tick will come out on its own and be stuck to the cotton ball when you lift it away.

    The Advantage type is 30 ML for $10, where one ML does 25 to 30 pounds of pets. The Advantage does 20 percent more weight per ML dose than does Frontline. The Ivermectin high dose for skin (LIS for fleas) is $4 for 30 ML.

    Since fleas carry tapeworms it is best to use flea control at the same time as you treat for tapeworms. If your pet has fleas then the environment (yard, or inside the house) is home to many fleas. Some people use Frontline or Advantage for a month or two and still see fleas on their pets. Flea infestation is the problem as so many fleas and eggs are in the carpet, furniture, or outside in the pet's environment. Getting rid of fleas in the environment is needed - see the use of Nylar two paragraphs above. Use the Frontline type treatment I provide to get rid of flea infestation, and treat for fleas every month (even winter) since fleas live in the house in winter's cold weather. Use more frequently than once a month if you see fleas on your pet. Frontline helps with ticks but not 100%. Use the Frontline or Advantage types every month, and then LIS (liquid Ivermectin for skin) applications every third month (but twice in the month you use it) if your dog is not sensitve to high dose Ivermectin in testing. I also rub some of these flea treatments on the chest, belly, and the inside of the hind leg thighs.

    Apply my Frontline or Advantage clone, Nylar and LIS flea control in drops on the bare skin spots along the pet's spine (from neck to rump). Nylar is not for cats except as a spray of the living area of cats. Part the hair of the back to put it on the skin itself. Use the measuring syringe provided and with Frontline type draw 3 ML to use on 75 pounds of pet weight (90 pounds using Advantage type), two ML on a 50 pound dog (60 pounds with the Advantage type), one ML per 25 pounds of weight (30 pounds with the Advantage type), 1/4 of a ML for a 6 to 7 pound dog or cat (7.5 pounds with the Advantage type), and 1/10 of a ML per 2 to 3 pounds of pet weight (3 pounds with the Advantage type). Use every month, for flea control.



    Liquid Ivermectin on skin (LIS) for fleas ($4 for 30 ML or $12 for 120 ML): Do not use this with cats or dogs less than 5 months old, and do not use (or any other high dose Ivermectin) with Comfortis, and do not use this with Collie or Collie related breeds (merle color particularly may indicate sensitivity) without testing carefully, but low dose of Ivermectin for heartworms is safe with all breeds and with use of Comfortis. Test before using the high dose Ivermectin as it is dangerous (even fatal) for some dogs that have the MDR-1 gene that most dogs do not have - see below. Dogs and cats must be at 5 months old, not pregnant and not nursing, before using the high dose Ivermectin.

    Some dogs show adverse signs early in the test, other show these late in the test, while most dogs show no signs in testing as long as the high dose recommended is not exceeded. To test you use one ML per 100 pounds (1/10 ML per 10 pounds), wait a week and if no adverse reaction is shown then try one ML per 50 pounds (1/10 ML per 5 pounds), wait a week and if no unusual signs shown then try one ML per 30 pounds (1/10 ML per 3 pounds), stop if any adverse or unusual signs noted and wash dog. You can safely use the monthly heartworm control dose of one ML per 500 pounds (1/10 Ml per 50 pounds) if any adverse signs are seen in above test. Some dogs show adverse signs early in the test, other show these late in the test, while most dogs show no signs in testing as long as the high dose recommended is not exceeded. Use the high dose full strength (one ML per 20 pounds of pet weight) a month later if all tests are passed: dose all dogs or cats over 5 months old, under 80 pounds, at one ML per 20 pounds of weight, and dose dogs between 80 and 120 pounds at one ML per 22 pounds of their total weight, and dose all dogs between 121 and more at one ML per 25 pounds of their total weight with a max dose of 6 ML no matter the dog size above 150 pounds. Use this high dose a month later if all tests were passed. This are the problems to look for:
    mydriasis -- [excessive dilatation of the pupil of the eye, as the result of disease, drugs or the like]
    depression
    coma
    tremors
    ataxia -- [loss of coordination of the muscles, especially of the extremities, as in unsteady walk or stance]
    stupor
    emesis -- [vomiting]
    drooling


    Perhaps as many as 75 percent of Collies in the United States have the mutant MDR1 gene, which has also been found to a lesser degree (25 percent) in Border Collies, Shetland Sheepdogs (Shelties), Australian Shepherds , Old English Sheepdogs (8 percent), German Shepherds, some hounds including Greyhounds, Long-haired Whippets, Silken Windhounds, and a variety of mixed breed dogs. These dogs with the MDR1 gene have an adverse reaction to high dose Ivermectin though the regular monthly dose in food, for heartworm control, is safe for all dogs. You can gene test to see if your dog has this gene before giving doses higher then the heartworm control dose of 3 to 5 MCG per pound, or before using this Ivermectin skin treatment for fleas. Test first at 1/10, then 1/5, then 1/3 of a dose – each dose separated by a week. You must observe closely for any unusual reactions (see above) using Ivermectin and stop using if observed. No merle colored pet (particularly Collie breeds) should ever be treated with Ivemectin above 3 to 5 MCG per pound (routine monthly dose to kill heart worm babies)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merle_(coat_colour_in_dogs

    Use one ML of LIS per 20 pounds, every three months at least (but twice in the month it is used), as drops on bare skin spots along the spinal line, like Advantage or Frontline, but at different times than Advantage or Frontline use (three week separation in application). Good for mange and mite control. 30 ML for $4, with syringe. If you use this every 3 months then you need not use Ivermectin in food for heartworm control - this skin spot application will do it. Swab one or two drops in each ear of dogs with a Q tip to get rid of ear mites (do every three days for at least 4 weeks), or swab inside ears with Frontline.

    Using only one type of flea control will develop resistant fleas and diminished treatment ability of the type used. Best to rotate different types, using a different one each month. A good strategy for both cats and dogs (that can take the high dose Ivermectin) is to use LIS (liquid Ivermectin for skin) every two weeks in the month it is used (or even every week if fleas are bad) in alternation with Advantage (once) and Frontline (once): use liquid Ivermectin for skin (LIS) now, and repeat LIS in 2 weeks, then in one month from now use Frontline, and two months from now use Advantage and in three months from now repeat this whole cycle again. Each month also use Nylar for most effective flea control. If your dog can't take the high dose skin Ivermectin then rotate Frontline and Advantage, and use Nylar with each flea treatment for the most effective flea control.


    Syringe care: A syringe without a needle is supplied free with all liquid products, of if requested, with powder products. The liquid Ivermectin products are dosed with this syringe but these may make the syringe plunger stick or freeze. Before use, draw a few drops of vegatable oil into the syringe and work the plunger to free it, then use. After use, flush many times with water to clean the syringe, then draw a few drops of vegetable oil into it, and work the plunger to coat the inside with oil, and leave the plunger in the out position for storage. Before use, again work the plunger to free it up with a few drops of vegetable oil in repeating the above procedure. Use only this same syringe with liquid Ivermectin.


    4. Heartworm as well as Round/Hook Worms, Mange, and Ear Mite control:

    Heartworms can infest many animals including humans (very rare though). They start such infestation with a bite from a mosquito where mature babies are deposited in the blood of the host. These mature babies can be controlled with monthly Ivermectin (the only active ingredient in Heartgard medication).
    Start at 5 months old with dogs or cats (no need to ever use if the pet is never exposed to mosquitoes, like for cats that never go outside).

    Read this:
    http://www.petshed.com/petcyclopedia...-for-dogs.htML
    Info on Ivermectin for different animals : http://www.guinealynx.info/ivermectin.htML


    Note: I have three different types of Ivermectin - two for oral use in food (high dose for most worms and low dose for heartworms only, for dogs only) and one liquid for skin use for dogs or cats (as a treatment for fleas, mange and even intestinal worms).

    Ivermectin is used once a month in a small dose for heartworms, and is safe for all breeds of dogs at this low dose.Ivermectin treatment with Heartgard, or other Ivermectin at the low-dose Heartgard doses, kills the babies in the blood and also (but not immediately) the adults in the heart. The adults in the heart die out (many within a year or two) as long as the babies are killed each month. Treating each month stops new adults from nesting in the heart (or elsewhere internally) and hastens the death of adult heartworms in organs. Thus, after perhaps two years of low dose Ivermectin treatment each month to prevent new heartworms, the pet will likely be free of all adult heartworms.

    Ivermectin can cause temporary side effects in a very small percentage of animals, with the proper dose. More than 100 times overdosing is likely to cause serious side effects, described below. Ivermectin is the only ingredient in Heartgard which prevents heartworms.

    Liquid Ivermectin (use in food or inject in mouth but not for cats) for monthly low dose use to control heartworms. Safe for all dogs and safe for use with Comfortis. Do not dilute with water as this makes Ivermectin unstable. Divide pet weight by 30 to get the ML dose.

    Dog low Dose for monthly heartworm control is $4 per 30 ML (does 900 pounds of pets), with needle-less syringe:

    1 pound of dogs = .033 ML
    2 Pounds of dogs = .066 ML
    10 pounds of dogs = .33 ML
    20 pounds of dogs = .66 ML
    30 pounds of dogs = 1 ML
    40 pounds of dogs = 1.33 ML
    50 pounds of dogs = 1.66 ML
    60 pounds of dogs = 2 ML
    70 pounds of dogs = 2.33 ML
    80 pounds of dogs = 2.66 ML
    90 pounds of dogs = 3 ML
    100 pounds of dogs = 3.3 ML

    110 pounds of dogs = 3.63 ML
    120 pounds or dogs = 3.75 ML
    130 pounds of dogs = 4 ML
    140 pounds of dogs = 4.3 ML
    160 pounds or more = 4.5 ML

    Liquid Oral Ivermectin (food use or inject in mouth, but not for cats) for high dose for round/hook/lung/whip and heartworms, as well as for mange and mites (use once, repeat in 3 weeks then, use every 2 or 3 months (once a month in areas with whipworms) but much more often for mange and mites, see below for mange/mite treatment). This has 33 X the concentration of the above heartworm control dose, for dogs only, and then only after testing. Price is $7 per 30 ML, with a needle-less syringe. For dogs that test well (not for cats) use one ML per 30 pounds. For Demodectic mange use every day for 50 to 60 days - but no more than 4.5 ML regardless of weight. Use this dose once every 5 days for at least a month for sarcoptic mange, once every 3 days for ear mites, and once a day for demo mange. TEST FIRST: Start with a low dose of one ML per 300 pounds, and in one week try one ML per 150 pounds, then in one week try one ML per 75 pounds, and week later use one ML per 45 pounds. Discontinue as soon as signs listed above (like unsteady gait, trembling/tremors, or excessive salivation) is observed and don't use the high dose again. If no side effects are seen after testing then treat with the high 33 X dose (one ML per 30 pounds) per the schedule above. The full dose may be given if all tests fail to reveal any adverse signs, but dose all dogs above 160 pounds as if they weighed 160 pounds - give these dogs 4.5 ML and no more. Adjust dose up or extend treatment length if no improvement in mange or mites is noted after 4 weeks. Demo mange can take daily high doses of 2 months (or more). Do not use this high dose with any pets less than 5 months old, do not use with Comfortis, and do not do this with cats or Collie, or Collie related, breeds (White feet don't treat). Perhaps 75 percent of Collies in the United States have the mutated MDR1 gene, which has also been found to a lesser degree (25 percent) in Border Collies, Shetland Sheepdogs (Shelties), Australian Shepherds, Old English Sheepdogs (8 percent), German Shepherds, some hounds including Greyhounds, Long-haired Whippets, Silken Windhounds, and a variety of mixed breed dogs. These dogs with the MDR1 gene have an adverse reaction to high dose Ivermectin. You must test (see above) to see if your dog has this gene before giving doses higher then the heartworm control dose of 3 to 5 MCG per pound. You must observe closely for any unusual reactions (tremors, salivating, unsteady gait) using Ivermectin. No merle colored pet (particularly Collie breeds) should ever be treated with Ivemectin above 3 to 5 MCG per pound (routine monthly dose to kill heart worm babies) unless you carefully test dose. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merle_(coat_colour_in_dogs







    Mange: The Ivermectin for Skin (LIS, $4 for 30 ML, $12 per 120 ML) a mange (and flea) treatment as it is used on the skin where the mange mites are. It also absorbs into the body to kill intestinal worms, including heartworm babies. The liquid Ivermectin for skin is a 33 X high dose. Oral Ivermectin in liquid (for dogs) can also be used.

    For Demodectic mange in dogs and cats use Ivermectin at the dose for horses plus 10 percent (which is 33 times the regular doses given above for heartworm control in dogs) every day for 30 to 60 days (using oral liquid or skin liquid Ivermectin). Use 100 MCG (not MG since one MCG is one thousands of a MG) per pound of pet weight for mange. Do this once a day for 45 days for Demo mange and then at least then one week beyond when your pet's coat has a healthy hair growth, no mange around bare skin areas, and no ear mite signs. Discontinue immediately if side effects occur like shaking/trembling, unsteady gait when standing or walking, or excessive salivation. Swab some Ivermectin liquid deep in ears with a Q tip for ear mites.

    For Sarcoptic mange (affects mainly the skin areas with little hair, and may show the crusty edge to the ears), use the 33 X dose once every three days for six weeks. Swab some Ivermectin liquid deep in ears with a Q tip for ear mites.

    Ear Mites: Ear mites have a life cycle of 21 days so treatment must be longer. A very small amount of the Frontline flea control (or liquid Ivermectin) applied to the inside of, and deep in the ears, with a Q tip will treat ear mites - apply a drop of flea control inside each ear - treat every few days for one to two months. Ear mites also reside on the body - Ivermectin in the high dose or flea control controls them on the body of the pet where ear mites can also be found.





    Stop ear mites with oil. When an infection is caused by ear mites, putting a few drops of oliv e oil in each ear will smother the mites and may allow the infection to heal. You usually need to continue the oil treatments for four to six weeks, putting three to seven drops of oil into the ear canals each day. To help the treatment work more efficiently, clean wax and other debris from the ears before using oil.

    Try an over-the-counter remedy. One of the best ways to stop ear mites is with over-the-counter products containing pyret hrins. Made from chrysanthemums, pyrethrins are natural insecticides that are very safe to use. Just follow the instructions on the label. Use to kill fleas in sprays, or in a small bottle for ear mites, which is what you need - available in large pet stores.


    Note: Care must be taken to not overdose Ivermectin in the high dose but overdosing some with the low dose Ivermectin for heartworm control only is no problem.


    Syringe care: A syringe without a needle is supplied free with all liquid products, of if requested, with powder products. The liquid Ivermectin products are dosed with this syringe but these may make the syringe plunger stick or freeze. Before use, draw a few drops of vegatable oil into the syringe and work the plunger to free it, then use. After use, flush many times with water to clean the syringe, then draw a few drops of vegetable oil into it, and work the plunger to coat the inside with oil, and leave the plunger in the out position for storage. Before use, again work the plunger to free it up with a few drops of vegetable oil in repeating the above procedure. Use only this same syringe with liquid Ivermectin.


    5. Fenbendazole (as in Safeguard and Panacur) - for
    Roundworms, Hookworms, Whipworms, Giardia, etc., 11,000 MG per $10 with a measuring scoop for measuring doses:



    Fenbendazoleis a broad spectrum benzimidazole anthelmintic used against gastrointestinal parasites including roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, tapeworms (not the type carried by fleas, which is the main problem), aelurostrongylus, paragonimiasis, strongyles, strongyloides, lungworms (need 7 to 10 days of treatment), flukes, and Giardia (I would treat 10 days in a row as this is difficult to treat). The Giardia parasite lives in the intestine of infected humans or animals. Giardia is found in soil, food, water, or surfaces that have been contaminated with the feces from infected humans or animals. Giardia can be spread by:

    1. Accidentally putting something into your mouth or swallowing something that has come into contact with feces of a person or animal infected with Giardia.

    2. Swallowing recreational water contaminated with Giardia. Recreational water includes water in swimming pools, hot tubs, jacuzzis, fountains, lakes, rivers, springs, ponds, or streams that can be contaminated with sewage or feces from humans or animals.
    3. Eating uncooked food contaminated with Giardia.
    4. Accidentally swallowing Giardia picked up from surfaces (such as bathroom fixtures, changing tables, diaper pails, or toys) contaminated with feces from an infected person.
    Giardia infection can cause a variety of intestinal symptoms, which include:

    Diarrhea
    Gas or flatulence
    Greasy or pasty stools that tend to float
    Stomach cramps
    Upset stomach or nausea
    The above symptoms may lead to weight loss and dehydration.

    Fenbendazole can be administered to sheep, goats, cattle, horses, fish, dogs, puppies 6 weeks or older, cats, seals, etc. Brand names are Panacur, Safeguard, etc. The usual dose for dogs or cats, based on weight using the chart below, is given once a day for 3 consecutive days (treat for 7 to 10 consecutive days for lungworms). For round/hook and whipworms repeat treatment (of three days in a row) in 3 weeks. The medication is tasteless and can be mixed with the animal’s usual food. Medicated food must be fully consumed to be effective. Horses get 25 MG per 5 pounds of weight on each day for five days in a row in the powerdose. For pets, can be used in pregnant animals, nursing mothers, and puppies at three or older weeks. Begin use with the mother at the 40th day of pregnancy, every day at 25 MG per pound, and continue until the 14th day after whelping, to control worms in the mother and her young. Fenbendazole in bulk powder (includes a measuring scoop to dose it): $10 per 11,000 MG (includes a 300 MG measuring scoop for dosing 10 to 12 pounds of pets or 60 pounds of horses or a 150 MG scoop for dosing 5 to 6 pound pets or 30 pounds of horses). Get one million MG of Fenbendazole for $240 shipped ($250 to Canada). Great for horse owners.

    Bulk Fenbendazole pure powder - dosing. Turn the closed bottle upside down before measuring a dose, then back to right side up (to loosen up any powder that has packed to the bottom of the bottle). Then use the one measuring dispenser provided by me to dip in powder to get a heaping amount (do not pack the powder into the quarter-teaspoon measure), then scrape the top off with a knife to get it level on top (scrape excess over a plate or piece of paper to catch the excess and save to put back into the bottle). Use this level scoop as 300 MG (for a 12 pound pet or for 60 pounds of horse in a one day of a powerdose - double dose - for horses). For small pets use the 150 MG scoop. Put this level scoop of 150 MG dose on a plate or foil, divide in half (two 75 MG piles) for two 3 pound pets, or divide in quarters (four 37.5 MG piles) for four 1.5 pound pets. Add or subtract to get the right dose for a particular pet. It is easy to divide in half, then repeat with the previous division - getting two equal piles each time. Get help from others if you have trouble - some people are better at estimating half of a pile than others.

    Pure Fenbendazole needed in each treatment per pet pounds:

    Dog/cat weight Pure Fenbendazole
    1 pound 25 MG
    2 pounds 50 MG
    3 pounds 75 MG
    5 pounds 125 MG

    6 pounds 150 MG
    7 pounds 175 MG
    10 pounds 250 MG

    12 pounds 300 MG
    16 pounds 400 MG
    19 pounds 475 MG
    23 pounds 575 MG
    27 pounds 675 MG
    31 pounds 775 MG
    35 pounds 875 MG

    39 pounds 975 MG
    50 pounds 1250 MG
    100 pounds 2500 MG

    Add weights above and add doses, as needed. For larger pets add separate weights above and get the MG amount amount, then subtact as needed - for a 150 pound pet combine the above weight of 50 pounds at 1250 MG times three = 3750 MG. Do above treatments once each day for three days in a row (I would do 5 days for whipworms and 10 days for lungworms and Giardia) for dogs or pets.


    Dosage of Fenbendazole for horses:

    For the regular one-shot dose of horses at 2.5 MG per pound or 5.5 MG per kg), do one day only in the summer, for the control of large strongyles, small strongyles, etc.

    For foals and weanlings (less than 18 months of age) where ascarids are a common problem, the recommended dose is double (the power dose) at 5 MG per pound (11 mg/kg) - but at one treatment (one day) also.

    Winter dosing of horses use 5 mg/lb or 11 mg/kg, and do this once a day for five days in a row, for control of encysted early 3rd stage (hypobiotic), late 3rd stage and 4th stage cyathostome larvae and 4th stage larvae of Strongylus vulgaris.


    Praziquantel/Fenbendazole bonus in bulk powder: 35,000 MG of Fenbendazole and 5,000 MG of Praziquantel for $40 with measuring scoop to dose - great for horses, multiple pets, etc.

    Use Fenbendazole if needed , where you can't use LIS. No need to add Fenbendazole (like in Drontal for dogs) unless you have whipworms or Giardia problems.High dose Ivermectin (LIS for skin or oral types) kills all worms but Giardia. Combine it with tapewormer use when needed (white segments seen in stools).


    Poultry: For poultry use 9 MG of Fenbedazole powder, per pound, per day. I would go 3 to 5 days in a row, in feed. Buy the bulk powder. For small numbers use the 150 MG scoop and divide in 8 equal piles and give each pile to a two pound bird (one and a half piles to a 3 pounder). You need a binder to mix the powder dose with the feed - light pancake syrup maybe (something the poultry will eat). For large numbers take the total pounds of birds and divide by 9 to determine the MG of Fenbedazole needed per a day,
    put this amount in one day's feed - use a food substance binder (red palm oil has been suggested to me - other vegetable oils might work) to attach the Fenbendazole to the feed. Do this for 3 to 5 days in a row.

    Fish treatment with Fenbendazole
    (must use my powder form):

    Some aquarium owners wish only a small amount of Fenbendazole with a very large amount of Praziquantel, since Fenbendazole is fed to the fish in very small amounts while Praziquantel is put into the water in large amounts. I can supply 1,500 MG of Fenbendazole powder for $1, or for free when you buy 22,000 MG of Praziquantel powder for $30.

    Camillanus is easily recognized as a small thread-like worm protruding from the anus of the fish. Control of this nematode in non-food fish is with fenbendazole, a common antihelminthic. Fenbendazole can be mixed with fish food (using gelatin as a binder) at a rate of 0.25% for treatment - 25 MG per 10,000 MG (10 grams) of food - one nickel weighs 5,000 MG or 5 grams, so food alone should weigh 2 nickels, before adding 25 MG of Fenbendazole and gelatin. Since one paper clip weighs 500 MG, the amount of Fenbendazole here is 1/20 of the weight of one paper clip - a very small amount. You can mix one part of this powder with 400 parts of food or 200,000 MG of food - parts are by weight. Put one 150 MG measure (I provide with the Fenbendazole or use level 1/8 teaspoon as 150 MG or 1/4 level teaspoon as 300 MG) of Fenbendazole on a plate, and mix with 60,000 MG (60 grams or two US ounces) of fish food and binder (gelatin or perhaps jam) bunch into one pile, feed parts to fish in treatment. For a smaller amount, take one 150 MG measure of Fenbendazole as above, divide in half, then divide these two in half - gives you four 37.5 MG piles. Divide one of these into two 18 MG, and mix one of these in with 7200 MG of food and binder (gelatin or perhaps jam). The fish food and a little jam (not preserves) weighs about three and a half nickels. Try to use very little jam - only enough to bind the Fenbendazole and food together. Take small pieces of the treatment mix and put in tank for fish to eat, and do this for 3 days at least. You want the medicine to stick to the jam and fish food, and not dissolve in the water - so the fish will eat it. It should be fed for three days at least, and then repeat for 3 days or more in three weeks.

    Capillaria is a large roundworm commonly found in the gut of angelfish, and controlled with fenbendazole - see above.

    http://www.petfish.net/kb/entry/154/

    Excerpt from above link: Dissolve 3CC of powdered Fenbendazole in 100ML of water. Mix well, then add as many bloodworms as you need to feed your fish. Soak for 30 mins to 1 hour, then dump the entire container in the tank, water and all. So, for 14.35 in cost, I picked up my Fenbendazole in powder/crushed form. I brought it home, and prepared the first dose. It seemed to really soak into the bloodworms, changing them to a slightly lighter and grayish color tone.


    I fed the fish 2x A Day for 2 days. I watched the affected fish carefully. Within 36 hours, all worms have withered and dropped away from the affected fish. Within 48 hours, I could find no remaining fish with Camallanus Worms protuding. I followed up with a good gravel vac and a large water change. I repeat this treatment in 2 weeks time, and then again in 2 weeks following if need be.

    Roundworms (also called nematodes) may also be found inside aquarium fish. They have complex indirect life cycles, and fish can serve as both intermediate and final hosts. Nematodes can cause problems to fish (and also to humans who become infected by eating raw or poorly prepared fish). Roundworms are reddish-brown in color and vary in size. In severe infections, they may be seen protruding from the vent. Nematodes can be found in the digestive system, swim bladder and body cavity. Treatment involves breaking the life cycle and using appropriate drugs such as Fenbendazole, which is dosed in food for three days at 250 mg per 100 grams of food. It may require several rounds of treatment, in addition to eliminating any intermediate hosts and improving general hygiene to remove infective stages.


    6. Horse treatment:

    Convert weight of horses in kilograms to pounds where one kilo = 2.2 pounds. Multiply kilogram weight of horse by 2.2 to get the weight in pounds, then dose in pounds.

    Winter - use Fenbendazole at the power dose of 300 MG of Fenbendazole per 60 pounds of horse weight (5 MG per one pound of horse weight), each day for five consecutive days. Do this also for new incoming horses. Use this powder form mixed in light syrup then mix in feed, and use 25 MG per 5 pounds of horse (250 MG per 50 pounds or 22.7 kilograms of horse weight), each day for five days. A 900 pound horse requires 4500 MG of Fenbendazole per day for five days in this power dose. This winter treatment controls encysted early 3rd stage (hypobiotic), late 3rd stage and 4th stage cyathostome larvae and 4th stage larvae of Strongylus vulgaris, where the recommended dose is 5 mg/lb (11 mg/kg) daily for 5 consecutive days.

    For foals and weanlings (less than 18 months of age) where ascarids are a common problem, the recommended dose is this power dose at 5 mg/lb (11 mg/kg), but for one day only.

    Spring - use one shot on one day of Ivermectin at one tube per 1250 pounds (568 kilograms) of horse weight. Also use Praziquantel in one treatment on one day using .7 MG of Praziquantel per pound of horse or 150 MG per 210 pounds of horse.

    Summer - use Pyrantel Pamoate, one treatment of one ML per 14 pounds of horse weight of the liquid wormer on one day. A 1200 pounds (545 kilograms) horse requires 86 ML of the liquid wormer.

    Late summer - use Fenbendazole powder (mixed in light syrup then mix in feed) at the regular dose of 2.5 MG per pound of horse weight, (25 MG per 10 pounds or 4.6 kilograms of horse weight), on one day only. A 900 pound horse requires 2,250 MG of Fenbendazole for one day of treatment only.

    Fall - use one shot on one day of Ivermectin at one tube per 1250 pounds of horses. Also use Praziquantel in one treatment on one day using .7 MG per pound of horse weight or 150 MG per 210 pounds of horse weight.

    Late Fall - use Pyrantel Pamoate, one treatment of one ML per 14 pounds of horse weight of the liquid wormer on one day. A 1200 pounds (545 kilograms) horse requires 86 ML of the liquid wormer.

    Treat all horses at the same time. Rotate pastures keeping one empty for some time (allowing worms in manure to die without infesting horses). Pick up and dispose of manure whenever possible.

    7. What is coccidiosis?

    Coccidiosis is a Protozoan – a one celled animal. It is not visible to the naked eye, but is visible under a microscope. It is easy to identify in fecal flotations. Cocci usually produces infection in young kittens and puppies, but adult pets can be affected.

    How is it transmitted?
    Transmission occurs from animal to animal through feces that contain oocysts. Other animals can act as an intermediate or transport host. The entire life cycle lasts one week. Cocci can be found in the stools without causing any problems until a stress factor causes an outbreak.

    What are the symptoms?
    Diarrhea is the main sign. In severe cases the feces are mucus like and bloody. It can be complicated by a loss of appetite, weakness, dehydration and anemia.

    Email me for treatment ideas.



    8. General Comments:

    Plan A - cheap and complete for all cats and most dogs : Use LIS (high dose Ivermectin for skin) after testing (see above) for MDR1 gene reactions (30 ML for $4 or $12 for 120 ML - dose one ML per 20 pounds on spots on spine, so 30 ML does two treatments for 300 pounds of dogs or cats). Use once and repeat in two weeks, then use at least every three months (using twice in one month) for short term flea and mange control (for up to 30 days), heartworm control (for 3 months), and round /lung/hook worm control. For tapeworms (some don't treat them as they don't cause severe problems) use Praziquantel powder ($1 per 150 MG pack for 40 to 60 pounds of dogs or cats or less money using a bulk powder with a 150 MG measuring scoop as in 1000 MG for $3) in food every 6 months or every year. Should also use - on a rotating basis - Frontline type ($10 for treating 750 pounds of pets in one month or a 75 pound pet for 10 months) and Advantage type ($10 for treating 900 pounds of pets) flea control with liquid Ivermectin for skin (if this can be used), where fleas are a problem. Also use Nylar ($10) each month for most effective flea control.

    Plan B - like plan A but instead of using liquid Ivermectin for skin, use high dose oral Ivermectin (liquid for $4 for 30 ML, used one ML per 30 pounds of dogs - not for cats - up to 900 pounds). Use this in food now and repeat in 2 weeks, then use every three months (twice in a month) for heartworm control (for 3 months of control) as well as round/hook/lung/whip worms (every month may be required). For tapeworms (some don't treat them) use Praziquantel powder ($1 per 150 MG pack for 40 to 60 pounds of dogs or cats or less money using a bulk powder with a 150 MG measuring scoop as in 1000 MG for $3) in food every 6 months or every year. Should use Frontline ($10 for treating 750 pounds of pets in one month or a 75 pound pet for 10 months) in rotation with Advantage type ($10 for treating 900 pounds of pets) flea control where fleas are a problem. Also use Nylar ($10) each month for most effective flea control.


    Plan C - safe for all dogs: If high dose Ivermectin is a concern (some dogs could have problems or even die with the high dose, which needs to be tested with gradual dose increases), then use the monthly low oral dose (liquid is $4 for 30 ML where you use one ML per 30 pounds of dogs for up to 900 pounds of dogs - but not for cats), or use the LIS liquid skin Ivermectin in the low dose (1/10 ML per 50 pounds) for dogs for heartworms. For tapeworms (some don't treat them) use Praziquantel and the liquid Pyrantel Pamoate wormer (or use the liquid combo wormer with Praziquantel) every 6 months or a year (repeat in 3 weeks with just the liquid wormer, for round/hook worms). Use Fenbendazole if whipworms, lungworms or Giardia is a concern. Should rotate Frontline type ($10 for treating 750 pounds of pets in one month or a 75 pound pet for 10 months) and Advantage type ($10 for treating 900 pounds of pets) flea control. Also use Nylar ($10) each month for most effective flea control.




    Puppies of 2 weeks or kittens of 3 weeks old can be treated with Pyrantel Pamoate alone and need it every two to three weeks (kittens every three weeks). Praziquantel (separately or added to the liquid Pyrantel Pamoate) requires at least 4 weeks of age. Only Praziquantel does tapeworms, but these are the least harmful and many people don't treat them often.


    The high dose Ivermectins offer not only heartworm but intestinal worm protection (round/hook/lung/whip/heart worms). Pyrantel Pamoate wormer or Fenbendazole wormer (except for Giardia) is not needed in this case. Use the skin Ivermectin (30 ML for $4), dose one ML per 20 pounds on spots on spine, twice a month, as you would use other kinds of spot flea control. Or if skin application is a problem then the high dose liquid Ivermectin every three months at a minimum for worms, twice in the month it is used. Or, if high dose Ivermectin in any form is a concern for some dogs, use the low dose liquid oral Ivermectin every month for heartworms but not for any other worms.


    Puppies of 2 weeks or kittens of 3 weeks old can be treated with Pyrantel Pamoate alone and need it every two to three weeks (kittens every three weeks). Praziquantel (separately or added to the liquid Pyrantel Pamoate) requires at least 4 weeks of age. Only Praziquantel does tapeworms, but these are the least harmful and many people don't treat them often.

    I offer three liquid Ivermectin's (pets must be 4 months old, and five months old for using the high dose, before using Ivermectin) - one for skin in high dose, one high dose for oral intake, and one low dose for oral intake. Cats can use the liquid for skin, but not the liquid in food for oral intake. All dogs can use the low dose but some breeds can not use the high dose (as revealed in testing). Most dogs can tolerate the high dose (read previous warnings or in section 3 below) which can provide great treatment at low cost over the years of use. However, don't combine high dose Ivermectin with Comfortis (low dose of Ivermectin is OK with Comfortis).


    The high dose Ivermectins offer not only heartworm but intestinal worm protection (round/hook/lung/whip/heart worms). Pyrantel Pamoate wormer or Fenbendazole wormer (except for Giardia) is not needed in this case. Use the skin Ivermectin (30 ML for $4), dose one ML per 20 pounds on spots on spine, twice a month, as you would use other kinds of spot flea control. Or if skin application is a problem then the high dose liquid Ivermectin every three months at a minimum for worms, twice in the month it is used. Or, if high dose Ivermectin in any form is a concern for some dogs, use the low dose liquid oral Ivermectin every month for heartworms but not for any other worms.


    Best all around wormer is high dose LIS (liquid Ivermectin for skin, use at one ML per 20 pounds on skin spots along spine) - this is a high dose dangerous for some dogs (test procedure is advised if you have any doubts - see below) but safe for all cats and most dogs (must be over 4 months old and over 5 months is best) and as good as Fenbendazole (except for Giardia), and does fleas as well - like Revolution for cats. Best to use every two weeks (twice) in the month that you use LIS (or once a week to really kill bad flea infestations). Only $4 for 30 ML or $12 for 120 ML.

    Rotate the above LIS (liquid Ivermectin for skin) with Advantage for $10 and Frontline for $10 for fleas and worms together - using only one type of flea control only breeds fleas that eventually can't be killed by the flea control - you'll notice the flea control stops working over the months of use of only one type of flea control. Also use Nylar (30 ML bottle for $10, for all pets except cats) each month on skin spots along spinal line at one ML per 20 pounds for most effective flea control - doesn't kill fleas but stops them from having babies so they all die out in a short time. Nylar can also be used as spray in the pet living area and here is OK with cats.



    Drontal plus is praziquantel with pyrantel pamoate (my liquid wormer) and febantel (realted to fenbendazole)


    Advantix is Advantage combined with permethrin (bad for cats but OK for dogs) to kill ticks.


    Advantage multi has a low dose avermectin for heartworms - same as my Advantage with LIS dosed in the low dose at one ML per 500 pounds of weight which is safe for all dogs but only kills heartworms (LIS at one ML per 20 pounds kills many worms)


    Frontline plus is my Frontline with Nylar so just add my Nylar in use with my Frontline.


    Treating fleas prevents tapeworms. Praziquantel treats both tapeworms but no other worms, Fenbedazole and high dose Iveremctin treats many other worms but only tapeworms the pet gets from eating dead animals but not the common pet tapeworm carried by fleas.

    Hookworm resistance can be a problem - watch for it - some overdosing of pyrantel pamoate or fenbendazole is safe (and combination of these two is more effective with resistant hookworms). Ivermectin in the high dose is used with resistant hookworms.










    If humans give love and establish themselves as the Alpha dog then the pet will be obedient. Disobedient dogs are trying to be the pack leader instead of humans - can't let them do it - give daily walks with them on leash and let them know you are in control as to where you go and when to stop - you become the pack leader. Watch the "Dog Whisperer" on National Geographic cable TV for more on this.

    House training can take time with so me dogs - don't punish. Take dogs outside frequently and when they go on the grass say 'Good Girl or Good Boy!' and pet the dog showing your pleasure. When they go inside then don't look at the dog but look only at the mess as you clean it up while cursing and acting mad - but toward the mess and not directed at the dog - don't even look at the dog. Leave newspaper out and if dog goes on the paper then clean it up (leaving the bottom sheet alone and in place) with no emotional expression at all - communicating 'That is OK.'. Then put fresh paper in place on top of the bottom sheet (left there revealing the smell as the place to go). Use paper when you travel to a motel, etc. Some dogs love you but love their independence as much, and may not respond to your commands all of the time. Don't get into power struggles un less you need to, and then reinstate your Top Dog status with walking them on a lease (where they defer to your control).

    Use flea control each month, even in winter. With heavy flea infestation use Ivermectin liquid flea control at the first of the month then either Frontline or Advantage types in the middle of the month (using Advantage one month and Frontline the other month), and use Nylar every month. Don't need to use any other monthly Ivermectin for heatworm control if you use liquid Ivermectin for flea control - the liquid absorbs and works internally as well as on the skin.


    Ringworm.Buy over the counter without prescription: miconazole 2% (with brand names such as Monistat and Micatin) or clotrimazole 1% (with brand names such as Lotrimin and Mycelex). Treat applying on skin twice a day, covering one inch beyond infected area, and continue for a week or two after the ringworm goes away.


    Food: Well known commercial brands are loaded with grains (and lacking in protein) which give pets problems - your favorite Health or Science diet is likely guilty of this. I like Innova EVO Herring & Salmon Dog Food, Horizon Legacy Adult Dog, Orijen with fresh fish, and Nature's Variety (Instinct) Duck Meal and Turkey for dogs since these have good Omega 3 and 6 fatty acid content.

    Xylitol is an artificial sweetener in sugarless gum, candy, and some bakery goods - a small amount can kill a dog - rush to Vet if signs indicate.

    Permethrin (actually dangerous for use with cats) can be found in a number of products labeled for cats (do not ever use these with cats) such as:

    Happy Jack DD-33 Flea and Tick Spray for Dogs and Cats

    Duocide L.A. Flea and Tick Spray for Dogs & Cats (Mfg. Virbac)
    KC 14-Day Flea & Tick Mist W/Aloe For Dogs & Cats
    No-Hop Flea and Tick Spray for Dogs & Cats
    Proticall Insecticide Coat Conditioner for Dogs & Cats
    Prozap Drycide Topical for Pets
    Repel-A-Cide Dip for Dogs & Cats
    Ritter's WB-14 Flea and Tick Spray for Dogs & Cats
    Synerkyl AQ Pet Spray for Dogs and Cats
    Synerkyl Creme Rinse for Dogs & Cats
    Synerkyl Pet Spray for Dogs & Cats
    Synerkyl Shampoo for Dogs & Cats


    Cocoa Mulch, which is sold by Home Depot, Foreman's Garden Supply and other Garden supply stores, contains a lethal ingredient called ' Theobromine'. It is lethal to dogs and cats. It smells like chocolate and it really attracts dogs. They will ingest this stuff and die.

    As few as 7 raisins or grapes could be toxic to a dog. Onions, chocolate, cocoa and macadamia
    nuts can be fatal, too.


    If you suspect your pet has ingested any of the following items, please call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center’s 24-hour hotline at (888) 426-4435. And remember to keep all medications tucked away in bathroom cabinets—and far from curious cats and dogs.

    NSAIDs NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) like ibuprofen or naproxen are the most common cause of pet poisoning in small animals, and can cause serious problems even in minimal doses. Pets are extremely sensitive to their effects, and may experience stomach and intestinal ulcers and—in the case of cats—kidney damage.

    Antidepressants Antidepressants can cause vomiting and lethargy and certain types can lead to serotonin syndrome—a condition marked by agitation, elevated body temperature, heart rate and blood pressure, disorientation, vocalization, tremors and seizures. Acetaminophen Cats are especially sensitive to acetaminophen, which can damage red blood cells and interfere with their ability to transport oxygen. In dogs, it can cause liver damage and, at higher doses, red blood cell damage.
    Methylphenidate (for ADHD) Medications used to treat ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) in people act as stimulants in pets and can dangerously elevate heart rates, blood pressure and body temperature, as well as cause seizures.
    Fluorouracil Fluorouracil—an anti-cancer drug—is used topically to treat minor skin cancers and solar keratitis in humans. It has proven to be rapidly fatal to dogs, causing severe vomiting, seizures and cardiac arrest even in those who’ve chewed on discarded cotton swabs used to apply the medication.
    Isoniazid Often the first line of defense against tuberculosis, isoniazid is particularly toxic for dogs because they don’t metabolize it as well as other species. It can cause a rapid onset of severe seizures that may ultimately result in death.
    Pseudoephedrine Pseudoephedrine is a popular decongestant in many cold and sinus products, and acts like a stimulant if accidentally ingested by pets. In cats and dogs, it causes elevated heart rates, blood pressure and body temperature as well as seizures.
    Anti-diabetics Many oral diabetes treatments—including glipizide and glyburide—can cause a major drop in blood sugar levels of affected pets. Clinical signs of ingestion include disorientation, lack of coordination and seizures.
    Vitamin D derivatives Even small exposures to Vitamin D analogues like calcipotriene and calcitriol can cause life-threatening spikes in blood calcium levels in pets. Clinical signs of exposure—including vomiting, loss of appetite, increased urination and thirst due to kidney failure—often don't occur for more than 24 hours after ingestion.
    Baclofen Baclofen is a muscle relaxant that can impair the central nervous systems of cats and dogs. Some symptoms of ingestion include significant depression, disorientation, vocalization, seizures and coma, which can lead to death.
    If you suspect your pet has ingested any of the following items, please call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center’s 24-hour hotline at (888) 426-4435. And remember to keep all medications tucked away in bathroom cabinets—and far from curious cats and dogs.








    Thanks for taking good care of your pets - so many people don't.

    Art



    Fish The Final Frontier
    http://s156.photobucket.com/albums/t25/dixienut/
    55g longfinned brown b n plecos/briggs
    55g briggs/blk khulies
    46bow cpd/cherry/malawa shrimp/blk khulies/otos/
    90g4 weather loaches-20l tiger endler 10gpygmaus cories and blue pearls/malawa shrimp



  5. #55
    Senior Member Lillyan's Avatar
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    Not sure if the meds are helping any. But I do see them eat some of the food.

    How would I know the meds are working?
    Can the worms survive in a tank with only plants and sand?
    If so, for how long? Any other way I can kill off the worms in a fishless tank, IE, cold, heat and/or salt?
    Do they also infest snails?
    What do the worms look like out of the fish?

    I am planing on moving the fish to the bigger tank but not adding any sand & plants until after I'm done treating them for worms. Why? Because I have so many plants that I would not be able to vacuum the worms up every day.
    Lillyan



  6. #56
    Senior Member Lillyan's Avatar
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    I have noticed the Platy are doing good, as far as worms not being seen. But the Bettas still have worms. Any reason the Bettas would still have them and the others not?
    Lillyan



  7. #57
    Senior Member ducatigirl's Avatar
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    my platys survive everything except jumping ship! hardy they are, mine are in the tank everything else was wiped out, just the breed strength.
    Bettas are not so hardy.

    wow its a wonder that post was allowed it is soooo long, but what a lifesaver! thank you SO much for that!

    I think i may have got giardia, i have the bad habit of mouth syphoning tanks, and syphoned the medic tank a week or so ago, boy did i pay for it, with those stomache cramps and yeah the rest! Was quite ill.

    I want to dose my fish and my dogs so this post will be invaluable.
    Thank you Dixienut!!!

    Lillyanne i want to know those questions too, cos i dont know if the poop i see is the red food they ate or worms.lol



  8. #58
    Senior Member Lillyan's Avatar
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    I'm getting a bigger tank tomorrow, so knowing the answers now would be a lot better than next week..lol

    I google search, but still no answers. >.<
    It's so annoying. I don't want to lose my Bettas, they are my babies. I kinda rather give up all my other fish and just keep them. Once the Platy are healthy, I am getting rid of them. I read they are the most common to having worms and harboring them! Wish I knew that before!!
    Lillyan



  9. #59
    Senior Member ducatigirl's Avatar
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    na the amount I've read on fish, gouramis, guppies, neons are worse.
    I bred my platys so i guess that is the difference.
    You are setting up a new tank? From scratch?
    I would not put fish in it for a month!!!!!
    The stress would be more likely to kill your bettas than leaving them where they are!
    I've done it 4 times (into a clean ESTABLISHED) tank and lost them all, moved the fish out of the infected tank, they all died, too much to cope with when they are stressed.
    what exactly are you searching for on google?

    OH and some good news!
    2 remaining angels out of the whole lot that died, treated with praziquantel , then after a water change, dosed tank with metronidazole, left it for a 24 hr, then did 40% wc, and then added a tiny bit of fenbendazole to frozen brine shrimp, fed that for 2 days, and they are both acting very normal and eating again like they have been starved for a week.They are out of danger now, as the white silky poo has gone! I am pleased. The other fish though, they were losing balance, sitting on bottom and hiding, it was too late for them by the time i worked out everything and found the meds.
    Last edited by ducatigirl; 04-01-2010 at 4:11 PM.



  10. #60
    Senior Member ducatigirl's Avatar
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    in your case...I would medicate the whole tank!



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