Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: New FOWLR

  1. #1
    Senior Member Wateveryousay's Avatar
    Usergroup
    AC Members
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Last Activity
    04-30-2014 12:41 AM
    Posts
    498

    Question New FOWLR

    I am wanting to start a new saltwater aquarium, I am an experienced freshwater aquarium keeper. I would like to do a 10 gallon FOWLR with lots of live rock. I would like to use live sand if that is the proper substrate, I've read different things. I've also read that if I have all live rock a filter is not needed and could even cause occasional ammonia spikes. Are these things true? And i was wondering if anyone knows of any cool inverts or other creatures that actively interact with their environments. Thanks





  2. #2
    Member jared185's Avatar
    Usergroup
    AC Members
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Last Activity
    03-08-2012 8:32 AM
    Posts
    33
    Honestly if I were u I would go with at leats a 30 gallon a 10 gallon is cheaper but also a lot more work and not as stable in water chemistry as a larger aquarium also it limits you on a lot of fish as most cannot live in a 10 gallon. As for the live rock filtration it does filter water but is not adequet a filter will be necessary as it helps to remove a lot of unneeded waste but trust me look on Craigslist and find a bigger tank if possible you will not be sorry

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I777 using MonsterAquariaNetwork App



  3. #3
    Member jared185's Avatar
    Usergroup
    AC Members
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Last Activity
    03-08-2012 8:32 AM
    Posts
    33
    Oh yes and live sand is a good all around substrate the best in my book but some people like crushed coral and other substrates

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I777 using MonsterAquariaNetwork App



  4. #4
    Senior Member Wateveryousay's Avatar
    Usergroup
    AC Members
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Last Activity
    04-30-2014 12:41 AM
    Posts
    498
    Yes, I've read that larger tanks would be easier, but I would like to do a smaller tank, I don't mind the water chemistry.



  5. #5
    Member jared185's Avatar
    Usergroup
    AC Members
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Last Activity
    03-08-2012 8:32 AM
    Posts
    33
    As long as you don't mind the water problems then by all means go ahead I have heard I don't know the name but I've heard of a seabirds that does beat in a 10 gallon it only get 2.5 inches if you are into those they have nice ones at WWW.swseahorse.com and there captive bred so they are very hady and forgiving of water conditions I just looked up the name its call h. Zosterae or dwarf seahorse

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I777 using MonsterAquariaNetwork App



  6. #6
    Bunned RNeiswander's Avatar
    Usergroup
    AC Members
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    SW Ohio
    Last Activity
    06-19-2014 5:52 PM
    Posts
    1,100
    I'd recommend reading some of the stickies in the general marine section.

    If I was starting out, I would at least do a 20 gallon long if possible, opens up stocking and lighting options a bunch. And stay away from crushed coral substrate, which you will see in the sticky.


    Sent from my iPhone using MonsterAquariaNetwork app
    If something is worth doing, it's worth doing right.



  7. #7
    Moderator greech's Avatar
    Usergroup
    Moderators
    Real Name
    Graham
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Last Activity
    08-13-2014 7:03 PM
    Posts
    4,187
    My take on tanks less that 20 gallons is that you should really have livestock in mind that you want to keep in a small tank for a while. It isn't so much the water quality concerns (assuming the tank owner is committed to doing the necessary maintenance) as much as the cost to setup not one but two tanks should you decide that you want to uprade after a couple of months. Chances are you are looking at buying more (or larger) pumps, filters/skimmers and lighting at a minimum if you get bored with the 10-gallon. Essentially you're buying equipment twice over a fairly short period of time. As RNeiswander mentioned you are also limited on livestock choices and the overall number of anmials you can keep in these size tanks is also limited. You mentioned this being a FOWLR and unless you go with micro sized fish, your looking at 1 to 2 fish total. Also, clownfish are not good fish for a 10-gallon if that is what you are considering.

    None of this means that you can't have a great looking 10-gallon tank. You could load it up with inverts like sexy shrimp and maxi-mini carpet nems which really looks stunning IMO. If you stick with the 10 gallon, keep it simple and use it as a test for whether you want to stick with the hobby. Good water, good rock, good flow and a heater is all you need. I would suggest adding at least a HOB filter like an Aquaclear 50 or 70 (or even a 110) to run some mechanical filtration (will need to be cleaned or replaced often) and some carbon and/or GFO. The trick to using these filter is to keep them clean so that detrtius doen't collect.
    SG = 1.024-6; Alkalinity 8.3-9.3 dKH; Calcium 420; Magnesium 1300; Temp = 76 to 80; pH = 7.9-8.3. Alkalinity and calcium are dependent on Mg.

    "You can't be half a gangster" - Jimmy Darmody, Boardwalk Empire



  8. #8
    Senior Member Wateveryousay's Avatar
    Usergroup
    AC Members
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Last Activity
    04-30-2014 12:41 AM
    Posts
    498
    The 20 gallon long seems like a good idea, I will be using all live sand and live rock. As for stock, at this point I'm leaning towards a pair of clownfish, and a firefish along with inverts. As for equipment, does this list work?

    Powerhead
    Filter
    Tank
    Top/Light
    Live Rock
    Live Sand

    Will that work until i am cycled? How do I add salt to the water and is there a test I need to make sure I'm balanced?



  9. #9
    Member jared185's Avatar
    Usergroup
    AC Members
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Last Activity
    03-08-2012 8:32 AM
    Posts
    33
    The thing u need to check salinity is called a hydrometer and yes the equipment will work but if ur planning on having corals u need a high output light something made for corals

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I777 using MonsterAquariaNetwork App



  10. #10
    Blue Fish blue2fyre's Avatar
    Usergroup
    AC Members
    Real Name
    Ashley
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Last Activity
    08-25-2014 6:48 PM
    Posts
    4,441
    Save yourself a possible head ache and get a refractometer. They are more accurate than Hydrometers. I think a 20 long would be perfect!



Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. New 60 Gal FOWLR
    By willsher in forum Marine Fish Only (FO) / Fish Only With Live Rock (FOWLR)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-06-2008, 11:33 PM
  2. my 60 gal fowlr
    By Whopper Stopper in forum Photo Gallery
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-22-2007, 11:17 AM
  3. New 29G FOWLR
    By wcolwell88 in forum General Marine / Newbie
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 07-16-2007, 6:32 PM
  4. new 125 fowlr
    By web2844 in forum Marine Fish Only (FO) / Fish Only With Live Rock (FOWLR)
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 02-09-2007, 12:57 AM
  5. What does FOWLR mean?
    By rainstorm in forum Freshwater Newbie Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-24-2006, 6:29 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •