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  1. #11
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    Any obligate corallivores including many butterflies...some of the wrasses...orange-spot filefish........
    Last edited by dorkfish; 11-26-2007 at 4:33 PM. Reason: thread clean up





  2. #12
    I'm a Sinker!
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    bi-colored angel very tough to get to eat sometimes, and not as hardy at LFSs will tell you



  3. #13
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    Another for the list: Linckia laevigata, the Blue Linkia starfish, with a mortaility rate over 90 percent, thousands are sold and lost for every one or two that adapt.
    Last edited by dorkfish; 11-26-2007 at 4:40 PM. Reason: thread clean up
    Keepin' marines happy for 25 years



  4. #14
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    It's not a fish but sea apples and cucumbers can have a devistating effect on a system and I know a person would quit the hobby because of them. They are very beautiful and their colors make them a very intersting pick for a begginer. The problem with them is that they have a unique defense mechanism that can wipe out an entire tank. When under poor conditions, rough handling (by you or tankmates), or any sever stress (such as being sucked into a power head which happened to my freind, the person I mention earlier) the sea apple or cucumber will expel its inards through its mouth and anus creating a poisonous cloud that will soon circulate through the tank killing all other tank mates and leave you devistated, heartbroken, and having to start all over. Most would not be able to come back to the hobby after something like this espcially with the emotional and monetary loss. Knowing the pleasures ,rewards , and joys of this amazing hobby I would hate for this to happen to anyone so I would advise against them for any begginer.
    "If we deny love that is given to us, if we refuse to give love because we fear the pain of loss, then our lives will be empty, our loss greater."
    —Tanis Half-Elven, Dragons of Winter Night



  5. #15
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    I am new to saltwater but some friends have tanks and have given me some advie on what to avoid..(from their experience)

    'Butterflyes, seahorses, eels, angels, pipefish, and some tangs.

    Everything else is undecided.

    Some species withh adapt good and some won't. I think alot of people here with 50 species on their list just had bad experiences with a certain fish they had so they are writing them off all together.

    Lionfish are a prime example...(almonst every type.) some people will say they are picky and...agressive...and territorial but my friend has 2 in a large tank with clowns...tangs...damsels and even crabs and it was just fine. He also used a dwarf lion to cycle his tank. I have also heard stories of people being uninformed and cycling tanks with 80 dollar butterflys...and they survive and flourish...though I am not a fan of cycling a tank with a living creature...It does save money when you consider all the live rock you would need.

    I think its more of a matter of maintaining a good tank (dont even have to be perfect) and crossing your fingers that your lion, trigger , damsel will not be the charlie manson of its kind .

    PS, I have also heard of damels dieing from small flucutaions in nitrate. So I don't think there can be a set rule. SOme species might be more suitable for beginners..but that doesnt mean you can negect them becasue they are "hardy" or "inexpensive".



  6. #16
    Nano-Reefer FreddytheFish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by damselmaster
    I am new to saltwater but some friends have tanks and have given me some advie on what to avoid..(from their experience)

    'Butterflyes, seahorses, eels, angels, pipefish, and some tangs.

    Everything else is undecided.

    Some species withh adapt good and some won't. I think alot of people here with 50 species on their list just had bad experiences with a certain fish they had so they are writing them off all together.

    Lionfish are a prime example...(almonst every type.) some people will say they are picky and...agressive...and territorial but my friend has 2 in a large tank with clowns...tangs...damsels and even crabs and it was just fine. He also used a dwarf lion to cycle his tank. I have also heard stories of people being uninformed and cycling tanks with 80 dollar butterflys...and they survive and flourish...though I am not a fan of cycling a tank with a living creature...It does save money when you consider all the live rock you would need.

    I think its more of a matter of maintaining a good tank (dont even have to be perfect) and crossing your fingers that your lion, trigger , damsel will not be the charlie manson of its kind .

    PS, I have also heard of damels dieing from small flucutaions in nitrate. So I don't think there can be a set rule. SOme species might be more suitable for beginners..but that doesnt mean you can negect them becasue they are "hardy" or "inexpensive".
    the snowflake moray eel is a very hardy fish, and many people consider it good for a beginner. the only thing is they get big and people try to cram one in a 10 gallon cause they buy them when theyre small






  7. #17
    Nano-Reefer FreddytheFish's Avatar
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    Alright, so its not a fish, but if you are a beginner I'd stay away from octopi. Especially the blue-ring octopus, its bite is lethal to humans.






  8. #18
    A man, struck down in his prime... itstheantitang's Avatar
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    didn't read whole thread but
    All sharks, shark eggs, seahorses

    NO jellyfish
    A man, struck down in his prime...



  9. #19
    Shark Bait zero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AW2EOD
    MonoSebaelover, I know you put this in your very first post, but I just wanted to touch on the subject just a little more after very extensive research that I've done.

    Sharks...

    There are 2 sharks that can live, and be somewhat comfortable in a 150gal. tank. They are the Banded Cat Shark and Marbled Cat Shark. They grow to an average of 40"Very cute, and active as babies, but here are 2 things that the fish store doesnt tell you.

    In captivity, 50% to 75% of them die within the first month by starving themselves to death. It's not the owners fault, it's just that naturally, they dont know to start eating. And IF they do eventually eat, it's already too late for them to survive. This happens frequently in the wild as well. They are just incredibly hard to get to eat. Frequently, even force feeding doesnt work (trust me, I've tried). I had my newly hatched Banded Cat Shark for 4 weeks before he died from starvation. My fish store actually told me that it would be hard to get him eating, but I thought..."ahhh, it cant be that hard. He'll eat when he gets hungry.".

    The second thing is light. Most fish keepers have decent lighting (florescent) to superb lighting (metal halides, etc.). Sharks require VERY low light. Even florescent is too much for them, that's why they're mainly active at night. What's the fun in keeping a large fish tank that has to have extraordinarily low light?

    Other than those 2 species, there are NO other sharks that you can keep in anything less that a 1000gal. to 10,000gal. tank. Alot of people get Horn Sharks...these grow to 6 feet. Blacktip Reef Sharks and Whitetip Reef Sharks, although absolutely gorgeous, can grow to 7+ feet.
    AW2EOD im sorry but i have to disagre with u on somethings. 1. no shark can ever live nicelying in a 150g tank the smallest u could have is 200 and thats just for babys. 2. other then the 2 u listed there are other sharks that can live in smaller homes then 1000g. But i do agrea on most of wut u said sharks should never be in a beginers home.
    Shark World



  10. #20
    vaguely present
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    I posted this elsewhere on the site, but it seems to fit well here.

    Reef Protection International has been working on this guide for some time, and I just got a note that it was ready for the "beta test." The idea is to provide a pocket-sized list of species that are suitable or unsuitable for aquaria, targeted especially to beginning aquarists who may not know all the issues involved.

    Here is a pdf of the guide, which will make a nice little card for carrying to the LFS.

    I would encourage people to check out the website and fill out their brief survey so they can get feedback on the guide.



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