Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 53
  1. #21
    Senior padder Squawkbert's Avatar
    Usergroup
    AC Members
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ST.L area
    Last Activity
    05-31-2014 10:09 PM
    Posts
    3,398
    someone mentioned jellyfish - that's right - some people keep them, but in dedicated tanks w/ very specific filtration properties (designed to limit current and ensure safety around lift tubes etc.).





  2. #22
    Homo sapiens blackwolfXKAV's Avatar
    Usergroup
    AC Members
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    New England Abroad.
    Last Activity
    11-18-2009 6:50 PM
    Posts
    828
    Quote Originally Posted by MonoSebaelover View Post
    Here are some more. I was too tired after that post earlier to add these so here are some more:
    Bumble bee Grouper- also grow to an astounding 6 feet long and best left in the ocean.
    Correction, these fish grow to nine feet in the wild, TFH did a great article on them in the DEC. 2006 edition.

    (Not that it really makes a difference to the purpose of the article)
    Displaying repeated dissatisfaction of Aquaria Central Administration and corrective actions is strictly forbidden.
    Things said through PM should not be posted in public forums.
    Marine Ornamental Fish and Invert Breeders
    http://www.projectdibs.com/



  3. #23
    Homo sapiens blackwolfXKAV's Avatar
    Usergroup
    AC Members
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    New England Abroad.
    Last Activity
    11-18-2009 6:50 PM
    Posts
    828
    Quote Originally Posted by MonoSebaelover View Post
    I've compiled a list that of fish that should not be kept by beginners and the reasons why, so here goes:

    Panther Grouper- look adorable as babies but soon grow to a 2 foot unattractive monster. (their heads stop growing and their bodie keep growing)

    Feel free to add more but this is a general list and does not include all. Research should always be done before buying a fish. (Orion-sticky please )
    Sorry, but again, correction, 36" in adult length.
    Displaying repeated dissatisfaction of Aquaria Central Administration and corrective actions is strictly forbidden.
    Things said through PM should not be posted in public forums.
    Marine Ornamental Fish and Invert Breeders
    http://www.projectdibs.com/



  4. #24
    Junior Member
    Usergroup
    AC Members
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Activity
    05-30-2007 2:47 PM
    Posts
    16
    Just read through peoples sugestions and would like to add Sea Apples many are sold over here (England) as bright easy to keep additions but normaly die and wipe out most of your tank!



  5. #25
    Senior Member Reefkid 07's Avatar
    Usergroup
    AC Members
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Last Activity
    05-23-2010 7:53 PM
    Posts
    261
    What about lemonpeel angels? And flashlight fish?
    Last edited by dorkfish; 11-26-2007 at 4:11 PM. Reason: thread clean up
    24 gallon HQI Nano Cube reef
    Check out my 24 gallon Reef Log/Diary
    http://www.aquariacentral.com/forums...d.php?t=159004
    I'm 15 and somehow manage to stock my tank.



  6. #26
    Its ALWAYS Ashes2Ashes Fault! Reefscape's Avatar
    Usergroup
    Global Moderators
    Real Name
    Blinky
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Staffordshire, UK
    Last Activity
    08-23-2014 12:57 PM
    Posts
    18,475
    Blog Entries
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by Reefkid 07 View Post
    What about lemonpeel angels? And flashlight fish?
    I would still class them both as the same [edit: as mandarins] with regards to experience and tank maturity needed....

    Niko
    Last edited by dorkfish; 11-26-2007 at 4:15 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by neoprodigy View Post
    its always Niko's Fault!... Thanks Niko!



  7. #27
    Senior Member
    Usergroup
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    ct
    Last Activity
    08-16-2010 12:46 PM
    Posts
    2,075
    from the experience i have had with my dragonette, they are easy fish to keep. they arent sensitive, dont get ich, etc. however, they do have requirements that are almost necessary for their survival. They need to be supplied with a large amount of pods. an just because you have 100 pounds of live rock doesnt mean you have a lot of pods. I think the experience when purchasing this fish to knowing their limits, habits, and also your tank. some tanks with much less live rock may have millions of pods, but the population is not likely to survive because there arent places for them to breed or hide. Also, especialy when tanks are younge, pod poulations tend to fluctuate a LOT. You need to give the tank time to mature in order for thier numbers to level out at a constant mean. Then if you have enough pods, it can be done pretty easily. In order to have a tank with an established pod population, i would suggest putting these fish in tanks no younger than 1 year (this does not count moving a 5 year old tank to your house and putting a mandarin in the next month). So i would definatly say this fish is not for beginners. because a beginner is goign to have a very new tank. and once they get more experienced, so does their tank to the point that they may be able to keep one. Of course though, they do require great water, as do all fish. But the thing about them that makes them not for beginners is their feeding habits and what they require for them. and that is my outlook on it.



  8. #28
    Salt-aholic Xtreme jojo22's Avatar
    Usergroup
    AC Members
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Last Activity
    12-02-2009 12:38 PM
    Posts
    2,304
    To add to what fishieness said, pods can be added to the tank from cultures available on the net (if interested shoot me a PM I know a great lady that will hook you up with a deal). The benifit of this is that you know the pods are there. The down side is that you still have to give them time to populate the tank, you can't toss in a bottle of pods and go buy a fish that relies on them.

    To add to the list any fish in the Syngnathidae family or any type of Cephalopods. Leave these fish alone untill you have a FEW YEARS under your belt and have done the required research.



  9. #29
    Member krj-1168's Avatar
    Usergroup
    AC Members
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Jacksonville,NC
    Last Activity
    08-21-2014 8:51 PM
    Posts
    32
    I completely agree - Sharks are not for Beginning Aquarists.

    Sharks require perfect water conditions, and a well maintained & stable tank/pond.

    While I also agree that no shark can be successful kept for it's entire life in a tank less than 200 gallons. I don't agree that only the Coral Catsharks (Atelomycterus sp.) can be kept in tanks under 1,000 gallons. Bamboos, Epaulettes, and the Horn Shark are often successful kept in tank/ponds in the 300-600 gallon range. These sharks species do require ponds of about a 1,000 gallons or more - if the aquarist is planning on breeding them.

    While all active sharks - such as Smoothounds, & the Leopard need ponds/lagoons that are well over 1,000 gallons. Smalll requiems(like the Blacktip Reef) due to the very active nature & the fact that they must to swim in order to breath - need at least tens of thousands of gallons.



  10. #30
    gill-less elementkid65's Avatar
    Usergroup
    AC Members
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    where ever i am
    Last Activity
    06-05-2008 2:35 AM
    Posts
    735
    .
    FS: Breeding pair of blue turq discus



Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Really need advice.
    By Zr0 in forum General Freshwater
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: 12-13-2009, 9:11 PM
  2. Piranha versus goldie!
    By Red Tailed Wonder in forum General Freshwater
    Replies: 88
    Last Post: 12-03-2008, 7:41 PM
  3. FRESHWATER ICH
    By fish_freak in forum Freshwater
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-25-2008, 6:19 PM
  4. San Diego Fish Club, Oct 10 Sunday Free
    By Woodle in forum General Freshwater
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-08-2004, 12:37 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •