Welcome to AquariaCentral.com

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. You will be entering into a wonderful world of aquatic information, for all aquarists, no matter what their experience level.

Our members will do their best to help you in your aquarium endeavors. We have a vast assortment of Forums to dive into:

-General Freshwater
-Marine and Brackish area
-Terrarium and Vivariums
-Coldwater
-DIY, Classifieds, Members Tanks Photographs and more.

We even have a general area, that is just as much fun as the rest of the Community, for off topic discussions and a real-time chat room for instant advice!

Joining Aquaria Central has numerous benefits, but the best, is our 112,000+ members, helping one another in this fascinating hobby!

Register now, and be sure to check out our scheduled contests with exciting prizes!

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today! !

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.

Welcome to the Internet's friendliest aquatic forum!

- Team AC

  1. We are BACK!!!!
    Dismiss Notice

Chloramine Neutralization?

Discussion in 'Freshwater Equipment, Products, & DIY' started by JohnSmith, Oct 8, 2008.

  1. JohnSmith

    JohnSmith Registered Member

    Real Name:
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2008
    Messages:
    134
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Last Seen:
    Oct 20, 2008
    I found this text:

    "If desired, both chlorine and chloramine can be removed for bathing purposes by dissolving Vitamin C in the bath water (1000 mg Vitamin C tablet will neutralize chloramine in an average bathtub)."

    From this document:

    http://sfwater.org/Files/FAQs/removal.pdf

    This sounds ideal!

    Anybody use this method (Vitamin C)? Anyone know if this is what commercial products are implementing? Anyone able to give a mg figure on what would be necessary for a standard amount (say 10g)?

    Anyone with any info that this is just "hooey?"

    Regards,
    JS
     
  2. Rbishop

    Rbishop ...and over the edge.
    Staff Member

    Real Name:
    Mr. Normal
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Messages:
    39,236
    Likes Received:
    161
    Trophy Points:
    117
    Last Seen:
    Yesterday at 6:04 PM
    Real Name:
    Mr. Normal
    nope, just use Prime..
     
  3. jmhart

    jmhart Revolutionary

    Real Name:
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2007
    Messages:
    2,745
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    Atlanta,GA
    Last Seen:
    Sep 15, 2016
    Given the lack of adequate testing methods, I would avoid trying this out. The only chloamine test available to your average hobbyist is livestock.
     
  4. excuzzzeme

    excuzzzeme Stroke Survivor '05

    Real Name:
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2007
    Messages:
    5,531
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    60
    Location:
    100 miles from water and 2 feet from Hell
    Last Seen:
    Aug 20, 2016
    It may work for bathing (external use), but what effect would it have on fish since they pass water across the gills (internal use)? Going to have to find more info.

    Thanks for the find.

    For emergency use only I would say.
     
    #4 excuzzzeme, Oct 8, 2008
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2008
  5. NicR

    NicR AC Members

    Real Name:
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2006
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Last Seen:
    Jan 7, 2009
    ill stick with prime... but i guess in a pinch that could work...
     
  6. JohnSmith

    JohnSmith Registered Member

    Real Name:
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2008
    Messages:
    134
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Last Seen:
    Oct 20, 2008
    This:
    "In 1977 ascorbic acid (a potent reducing agent) given intravenously or added to the dialysate water was demonstrated to protect against oxidative haemolysis secondary to chloramines at lower levels of contamination [6]. Ascorbic acid reduces chloramine to ammonium and hydrochloric acid and increased haemoglobin levels."

    At this URL:
    http://ndt.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/14/11/2625

    Suggests they are injecting it into people veins!

    Regards,
    JS
     
  7. Mgamer20o0

    Mgamer20o0 BobsTropicalPlants.com
    Staff Member

    Real Name:
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Messages:
    31,221
    Likes Received:
    15
    Trophy Points:
    89
    Last Seen:
    Aug 22, 2016
    there is other ways to neutralize it but i rather stick with prime.
     
  8. Notophthalmus

    Notophthalmus I put the 'snork' in 'snorkeling'!

    Real Name:
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2008
    Messages:
    1,977
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Last Seen:
    Sep 14, 2010
    Interesting, but I wouldn't do it. It doesn't say what happens to the ascorbic acid - it could be converted into something nasty, and even if it only acts as a substrate and so maintains its identity, levels that high would probably hurt your fish. I would stick with the tried-and-true dechlorinators.
     
  9. JohnSmith

    JohnSmith Registered Member

    Real Name:
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2008
    Messages:
    134
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Last Seen:
    Oct 20, 2008
    This:
    "Why do kidney dialysis patients have to take special precautions?

    In the dialysis process, water comes in contact with the blood across a permeable membrane. Chloramines in that water would be toxic, just as chlorine is toxic, and must be removed from water used in kidney dialysis machines. There are two ways to do that - either by adding ascorbic acid or using granular activated carbon treatment. Medical centers that perform dialysis are responsible for purifying the water that enters the dialysis machines."

    From here:
    http://www.ccwa.com/chloramines.htm

    Suggests if they are introducing amounts of vitamin c (ascorbic acid) into patients blood streams--necessary to neutralize any chloramines present in the water, there is little need to panic ...

    However, that said, I am just looking for people on the cutting edge who are familiar with this, been over this ground already, or are currently doing research; the avg. aquarium keeper will only go with commercial products ...

    That said, you are already introducing some amount of vitamin c into your aquarium if you are feeding a balanced, quality dry food ... personally, I always keep a bit of marble or "sugar limestone" in my aquarium just to balance this out (and, one can always throw in some charcoal.) And, of course, if you have to maintain slightly low ph or soft water, this is impractical ...

    Regards,
    JS




     
  10. JohnSmith

    JohnSmith Registered Member

    Real Name:
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2008
    Messages:
    134
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Last Seen:
    Oct 20, 2008
    Anyway, I found, kind-of, what I was looking for. This URL (bottom page 24, top page 25):

    http://books.google.com/books?id=nB...&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=6&ct=result

    gives two compounds which chloramine and ascorbic acid are converted to--
    ammonium chloride and dehydroascorbic acid.

    So, it appears one would still have to neutralize the ammonium chloride (one of the fertilizers I used/experimented-with actually contained a small percentage of ammonium chloride--that always did worry me) ... I will further research all this.

    Thanks to everyone who replied.

    Regards,
    JS
     

Share This Page

zoomed.com
hikariusa.com
aqaimports.com
Store