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My future pH problem...

Discussion in 'Freshwater Archives' started by Jamie, Sep 1, 2003.

  1. Jamie

    Jamie AC Members

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    So I've got this great 150g...The water out of my tap is a little bit messed up. It has an extremely high pH with a low hardness...after a little help from you all- we determined that my water co uses slated lime treatment and my water is deprived of CO2 out of the tap thus resulting in an abnormally high pH. So as long as it sits out for a day or so it absorbs ambiant CO2 and goes down to about 7.2 pH. So here's the future problem. I fill up my tank, let it sit for a day and the pH goes to normal, I cycle, etc. What's going to happen with my first water change? Even if I only do 20% thats 30 gallons! I don't have the room for aqing thirty gallons of water..and I guess the usefulness of my no spill python is cut in half. One though is that I have a press CO2 system with pH controler. If CO2 depletion is the problem maybe the adding of CO2 will compensate for the high temporary pH. Or will the addition of the high pH water freak out my fish. Man...I think I need some stress coat.
     
  2. wetmanNY

    wetmanNY AC Members

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    Jamie, how about one of those Rubbermaid lidded garbage cans with the built-in wheels? Stands in the closet where you're keeping that old airconditioner that doesn't really work and the snowshoes and the artificial Christmas tree that needs a couple of more branches...

    Your problems are really centered around not "ageing" water for a couple of days. Isn't that it?
     
  3. Jamie

    Jamie AC Members

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    I was thinking about something like that....but how to pour it in the tank seemed to be the dilemma there. It would be nice if I could syphon it but that's not an option if it's on the floor and the tank is on a stand.
     
  4. SnakeIce

    SnakeIce AC Members

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    a pump left in the bottom of the can is one possibility, I don't know what size or style but that can be found out. just a cheapo would do since you wouldn't be using it vary much
     
  5. RTR

    RTR AC Members

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    I use the Rubbermaids on wheels for aging water. I've used AquaClear 402s, 802s and Eheim hobby pumps to circulate the water and pump it to the tanks. I also use a heater mounted on a strip of glass at the bottom of the vessel.

    Pump on bottom (on sponge to damp vibration - helps with AQs, not needed w/Eheim), hose runs from pump to top egde with U-support over rim(Eheim componenet, slips over outside of tubing, no cut required), tube drops to floor and returns to rim where an Eheim connector hooks over the rim and returns water to the tank. The connector is a cannister component, vertical straight tube with U-hook at the end but very end returns to horizontal -so the water is moving from the tube parallel to the water surface. It is a canister reurn tube which would connect to the sparay bar of a canister. Does that picture work? To move to a tank within hose reach, cover the end with your finger and move it to target tank. Horizontal water feed disturbs the substrate less than vertical.

    I fill so that the water level is about midpoint of the return tube output - mild aeration without splashing. In 48 hours my chlorine is undetectable and my water is at tank temp.

    The AquaClear powerheads will not chatter if asked to pump against a head - there are three tiers of tanks in this area. The Eheim hobby pumps last longer. Any of these will do the job.

    The top should be part-open, part covered for air exchange - do not cock the lid partly off - any spray or condensate will drip on your floor (do not ask how I know this). Slice or saw the lid about 3/4 -1/4 and keep the two sides separate.

    HTH, but ask if unclear...
     
  6. Cearbhaill

    Cearbhaill Reads the Gribble Report

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    I have water issues similar to yours- I store water in 30g Rubbermaid garbage cans also.
    As long as you don't fill them past the handle you can slowly drag them pretty far while they are full ;).
    It's very easy on tile but suprisingly possible on carpet as well- try it!

    Depending on which tank I am servicing- I fill the garbage can with water either from a bath tub shower hose or my kitchen faucet, drop in an airstone, some dechlor, and leave it overnight.
    I too use an Eheim hobby pump to get the water into the tank- temperature is adjusted at the last minute with hot tap water.
    I also use a spare garbage can for water that is removed so I can put it wherever I want in the garden- I had a Python but I cut it up for tubing- it just didn't turn out to be useful for my needs.

    The thing you have to understand is that you will sort out your own problems kind of as you go- everyones home and set up is different. The first time you change water this way you'll be running all over the house ("man I need an extension cord"), the second time you'll have most of the stuff you need right there. As time goes on you'll figure out your own best system and will have already gathered supplies in one place (and hopefully keep them together).

    After the first two times I now have all of the supplies I need (including dechlor, algae pads, air pump/airstone, Eheim pump, extension cords, towels) stored inside the stack of garbage cans in my fish closet. I just pull out one garbage can and everything I will possibly need is already in it.
    It is handy, easier than it sounds- and my fish get the best water I can give them.
     
  7. wetmanNY

    wetmanNY AC Members

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    Threads like this one should be archived here at AquariaCentral...
     
  8. OrionGirl

    OrionGirl No freelancing!

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    I will archive this one, but would like to give it a few more days to allow everyone to add their tips.

    I use a large garbage can to store water, so it's always ready for use during top-offs and water changes. With the addition of 2 55's, this means that one can is not enough, and I am looking to get a large agriculture tank to replace the garbage can. The agriculture tanks are safe to use as long as they are new, and come with a bulk head fitting on the lowest point for a gravity feed. Very useful for adding a valve to drain, clean, and be able to fill buckets. For some tanks, there is enough pressure to just hook up a hose and run the water directly into the tank.
     
  9. Pink Pat

    Pink Pat AC Members

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    Jamie,

    Why go to all of this trouble? Simply changing smaller amount of water will allow the water changes to become 'tolerable' (for lack of a better term) by reducing the changes and allowing time for the water to 'swing' back to the normal ranges.

    Less water, more often. It works.

    HTH

    PP
     
  10. OrionGirl

    OrionGirl No freelancing!

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    Since no one else responded, I archived this thread.
     

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