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Please help me with my neighbors pond

Discussion in 'Indoor/Outdoor Ponds' started by ReglDsigns, Aug 27, 2011.

  1. ReglDsigns

    ReglDsigns
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    I live near and elderly couple that recently have had various health issues. I have been enlisted to help them with their outdoor pond. In past years it's been beautiful but this year it has not been touched for maintenance. What am I in for? I have fish but know absolutely nothing about ponds.

    So far I see a metric ton of algae on the top of the water...they want me to purchase feeder goldfish...GOLDFISH! to resolve this. I know thats not the right thing to do, but since I don't know what the right thing to do is, I'm having a hard time talking them out of it. Is it logical to just try to skim to top of the pond? The only thing living in it that I can see is frogs.

    They also have something they call a bubbler which may or may not be a filter or a bubbler.

    I've told them that it's almost September in Ohio, leave the pond for next year but they seem to believe that this will ruin the pond.

    Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated...
     
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  2. Lillyan

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    How have they been caring for it in the past? If they always had a beautiful pond, they must know what they are doing on some level.
    I use a UV filter to keep the water clear. You should find out what the bubbler is.
     
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  3. jackiomy

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    Goldfish are a good idea. We have goldies in our pond and they do a great job. It is actually pretty easy maintaining a pond. DON'T use chemicals! Some manual labor is all you need. :) A scrub brush or even a toilet brush (new of course) attached to a pole is a great way to get rid of string algae. The big thing is, don't overthink it. If there are fish be careful around them, pull out the filter or bubbler, get it cleaned out remembering not to ruin your beneficial bacteria by washing it out in a tub of pond water. It is really the same as your aquarium just a little larger.
     
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  4. ohbly

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    It might be helpful to vacuum the gunk off the bottom if there is a lot built up.

    Also 1 post since 2007 is pretty crazy:jaw:
     
  5. XanAvaloni

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    How big is this pond, and what is it made of? If it has a rubber/plastic liner you will have to be careful not to tear it, but you almost certainly need to excavate. The pond is probably full of leaves that have fallen over who knows how many years.

    Agreed with jackiomy though--goldfish are a great idea, I have them in my pond as well.
    Feeders" is a somewhat unkind term but you definitely don't want anything fancy. I Started out 10 years ago with six and they have been living and breeding entirely on their own ever since. If the pond has at least one area that's 2 ft deep--you might get away with 18 in but 24 is better--the fish will survive overwinter just fine without human intervention. If the algae layer covers the top completely get a pool skimming net and scoop out enough to clear an open space. Then get that bubbler thing working to up the oxygen level. Then add fish and the problem will begin to resolve itself.

    Pictures, as always, would be nice. What other plants, intentional and otherwise, are in the pond? If it's too overgrown you may have to rip everything out and start over; that's where I am presently at since I got an infestation of cattails or some similar reeds stage an invastion. As a decrepit if not yet qualified as elderly person myself I commend you for assisting your neighbors in this way. :)
     

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