Lowest cost and easiest way to eliminate green hair, bubble, turf and slime algae

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SantaMonica

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Lowest cost and easiest way to eliminate green hair, bubble, turf and slime algae from your aquarium (hopefully permanently).

This new test version of the algae scrubber is much easier to build than the waterfall version (the Mega Powerful one), and is perfect for nano's. This new scrubber has never been posted before May 2012. It works in both freshwater and saltwater.

If you are like most aquatic hobbyists, nuisance algae is an ongoing problem. You try to feed your livestock, and the next thing you know, you get algae. You've already tried many fixes; some work but are expensive; some kind of work but you're not sure; and some just don't work at all.

Think about what is happening: Your aquarium is accumulating nutrients (nitrate and phosphate) because of the food you feed. Algae eat nitrate and phosphate to grow, so the algae are having a great time growing in your water because they are eating all your nutrients! What to do?

Well think about this: In order to grow, algae must be provided with nitrate and phosphate. So why can't you just use the algae to consume all the nitrate and phosphate? The answer: You can! How? With a simple device you build called an Upflow Algae Scrubber. It's simple, cheap, and you can make a small one in just a few minutes with parts you probably already have. I'll be posting more complex versions later, but here are some pics of the most basic design that you can use for testing:

(will be updated periodically)





An "algae scrubber" is a simple filter that actually grows algae in the filter, so that the algae do not grow in other parts of your aquarium. Simply put, the conditions for algae growth inside the filter are better than the conditions in the rest of your aquarium; thus the algae grow in the filter instead of your aquarium, and then you just remove the algae from the filter and throw the algae away. But in order for the algae to grow in the filter, the algae need to consume nitrate and phosphate; so guess where the nitrate and phosphate come from? Your water!

If you stop and think about it, algae always grow in certain spots, and not in others. This is because some of the three growing conditions (light, flow, nutrients) are better in some parts of your water than they are in others. An "upflow algae scrubber" simply optimizes these conditions, and does so at a place where the algae can be easily removed and thrown away. And once the nitrate and phosphate have been removed from your water, all other nuisance algae such as green hair, bubble, turf and slime, will have a hard time staying alive.

So where have these filters been all this time, and why haven't you heard of them if they work so well? Well the original waterfall version (the Mega Powerful thread posted in August 2008) was hard to build, and was not really for sale anywhere; so unless you liked to build things from scratch, you had no choice but to buy some other kind of filter. All the filter really needed to do was to create good growing conditions (light, flow, nutrients) for the algae, by flowing the water across a piece of rough material, so that the algae would grow on the material instead of somewhere else in the aquarium. The waterfall algae scrubber did grow lots of algae in the filter, and it removed lots of algae from aquariums: Over 1,000 people built their own waterfall algae scrubbers, and reported their results on various forums during a 4 year period; almost all of them wiped out their nuisance algae within 8 weeks, and many did so in 4 weeks. And on other forums that I never posted on, an estimated 10,000 people built their own waterfall algae scrubbers with similar results.

A little over a year ago in April 2011, another idea came along: Instead of letting the water flow down a screen like a waterfall, how about you let the water flow up the screen using air bubbles? Why? Because as good as waterfall algae scrubbers are, they still need a place for the water to drain "down" to. This means that you need to have a sump below the aquarium, or you need to have the scrubber up above the aquarium. This is not easy, and is very difficult for a nano aquarium which usually has no sump below it, and no room above it. Also, the waterfall version requires it to be out of the water (in the air), which takes up extra space. The new "upflow" version, however, can be placed inside the aquarium, so that it takes up no extra space at all, and it needs no external plumbing or water pumps at all. Only air bubbles.

The Upflow Algae Scrubber (UAS) provides the best growing conditions for algae in your tank: Air bubbles provide rapid turbulent flow; Strong lighting provides the light; and the nutrients that are already in your water provide the nitrate and phosphate. All that's needed is a place for the algae to attach to, and that is provided by the roughed-up plastic screen. Thus the algae start growing on the screen because the flow and lighting are stronger there than they are in the rest of your aquarium; nitrate and phosphate are consumed in the process. This causes algae to start disappearing from your aquarium and start re-appearing on the scrubber screen, so that you can throw the algae away every week or two.

The most basic way to set up an Upflow Algae Scrubber, especially in small aquariums, is just to put some air bubbles beneath a vertical screen. If inside an aquarium, you just put a light on the outside of the glass, so that it shines inside to the screen. And if you want better performance (which means better filtering), just add a reflector to give the screen some light on both sides. The screen is best made with 7-mesh cross stitch plastic canvas that you get at sewing or craft stores, or online. Also, don't forget to rough up the screen with a sharp object like a hole saw; the screen should be so rough that the screen holes are almost filled in with all the little pieces of plastic that you roughed up.

One thing to remember is that an Upflow Algae Scrubber (or any algae scrubber) will not cause more algae to grow in your aquarium. Instead, the algae will disappear from your aquarium, and will start to grow on the scrubber screen instead. You then just remove the screen and scrape the algae off. And here's a surprise: Watch out for your fish or snails eating your filter! There's nothing tastier than live green algae, so your fish or snails may keep your screen from getting very thick. The simple solution is to just put some mesh or netting around it.

There are a couple of requirements that have been learned since August 2008 which will get you started quicker. The size of the Upflow Algae Scrubber that is needed is based on how much you feed, and not how much water you have, because the nutrients that cause algae to grow come from the food you feed. The following updated picture has size guidelines:

(will be updated periodically)





And the following updated picture has examples:

(will be updated periodically)





So build a UAS and post your pictures!
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XanAvaloni

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Nov 13, 2009
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Yay! been waiting for this. :)

Is there anything else besides a hole saw that can be used for the roughening-up process? I don't have one at present, have no imminent need for any hole-drilling, and recall from years ago when I last bought one that they are not cheap.
 

constevens

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Sep 7, 2011
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Ok........ Question on this... Not all algae is actual Algae. And not all algae is due to excessive nutrients. BGA or Slime algae is actually a cynobacteria. Its due to a lack of Nitrates not. Green spot Algae is do to a lack of Phosphates. Most all algae is due to lighting issues and water conditions outside of just having high Nitrates and phosphates. BBA is normally a balance issue with Co2 and lighting... How will this product help in the issues I mentioned above? Like BGA, BBA and GSA?
 

SantaMonica

AC Members
Some of what you said is correct. All algae need nitrate and phosphate to survive, so if you grow algae separately and harvest it and throw it away, then the nuisance algae in your tank will fade away. Cyano, even though it's bacteria, will also fade away eventually, although it will be the last to go because it does not need nitrate.

By "slime", I did not mean cyano; I meant dino's or diatoms.
 

constevens

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Some of what you said is correct. All algae need nitrate and phosphate to survive, so if you grow algae separately and harvest it and throw it away, then the nuisance algae in your tank will fade away. Cyano, even though it's bacteria, will also fade away eventually, although it will be the last to go because it does not need nitrate.

By "slime", I did not mean cyano; I meant dino's or diatoms.

ok... you say some of what I said was correct... Like whats not?

Im still curious how this product will help against all algae? As ive mentioned before what about green spot algae? Its a true algae but its due to low phosphates and to much light exposure. Or BBA thats due to way to much light and poor co2/circulation? I question it because no all algae is due to the same issues.. Green water, Hair algae, GSA, BBA, and so on and so on.
 

Fishfriend1

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Dec 11, 2009
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My biggest question: why is algae bad? Just get a few otos, that'll take down your algae issues... (promotes otos because they are adorable) :D
 

constevens

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Sep 7, 2011
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All algae are indeed algae. Bacteria are bacteria.

All algae require P. Reducing P will reduce all algae. With low enough P, no algae will survive.
That is correct that algae are algae and bacteria are bacteria But your way off thinking reducing Phosphate will reduce all algae. I have to full disagree. If you work with lots of live planted tanks as i and other do you find out alot of what makes algae grow. Green spot Algae is actually caused by a LACK of Phosphate and by increasing your Phosphate you can get rid of it and keep it from coming back. Most All algae issues like Hair, Staghorn, BBA and some others are due to the amount of light given to a tank vs the Co2 levels in the water. Some Alage happens due to low Nitrates. In planted tanks you can inject more co2 and watch the algae go away. Along with reducing light and photo period. How will this product work for people that have to much light? Running their lights to long? It wont. Im not trying to be rude but asked how this would work when there are known issues that cause algae and im trying to understand how it fixes those issues. Because just reducing Phosphates isnt going to do it.
 

SantaMonica

AC Members
Since P is required for growth of all algae, if there is no P, algae cannot grow. What probably is happening when you add P and see a reduction in algae is that a competing algae is taking over because it now has enough P to grow.

But regardless, algae scrubbers have been tested and used by over 10,000 people since August 2008, and the scrubbers do what you want: Reduce or eliminate nuisance algae, with no waterchanges, skimmer, GFO or carbon dosing needed to do so.
 
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