Pros and cons of quarantine tank?

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mcsassy

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Jan 28, 2008
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So, from what I think, the pros are having a healthy fish go into the tank without risking disease being spread and plaguing the tank, thus saving many headaches and such.

The cons, in my opinion are that a quarantine tank is usually small, has no sand, no live rock, no nothing pretty much...so it is not a natural environment for the fish, which I would think could further stress the fish and make it worse off in some situations. By this I mean that by not inserting it into a more natural habitat, having it in a little box for a while can be harmful to it.

My solution, I guess would be to do a nice long freshwater bath for all new fish before putting them in the display...say about a half hour or so. This way anything that may be on the fish already could be killed off and it could be ready to join a more natural place and you run less risk of stress I would guess.

Thoughts/opinions?
 

Almondsaz

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May 26, 2007
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I agree on the notion that this could add stress to an already stressful change for the fish. However, if it isn't a wrasse that needs sand to bury....I believe in the QT. It is an opportunity to worm wild caught fish, and QT treat if indicated, whithout impact to the DT.

I do not QT leopard wrasses, coris wrasses becuase the QT doesn't have sand on the bottom and only has a PVC piece of tube. I have tried a container of sand in the QT for the wrasse to bury in, but with little success.

I can't say that I am faithful about QT of all fish that go in my system either. One LFS that I frequent treats their fish each night in the system and it flushes out by morning. The fish are in bare cubicles. You can see the fish eat, etc. They do keep wrasses in a sand base.

Hope that helps. I have to add that I am one of those that does use a UV on the DT and run it at night.
 

mcsassy

professional fool
Jan 28, 2008
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Yes, but how about tangs, most likely the number one culprit and reason for quarantine? Don't they need space to swim and caves and such to take refuge in?

Would you agree with the idea of a perfectly executed bath and then straight to the display?

Also, on the note of the bath, what is the proper way to transfer the specimen back to saltwater conditions after the long bath? Wouldn't dumping it straight back into saltwater after a bath shock it? Would you drip acclimate its bath or just slam it back into salty conditions?
 

Almondsaz

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May 26, 2007
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MCSASSY: I have to say that when I do a freshwater dip it is usually to go into the QT. And the duration of the dip is typically (for me) no more than 10 min, always watching the gill movements to look for signs of increasing stress. I would suggest a read on Wetwebmedia where they cover the dip/dip process. I don't have a lot of experience for other than the generic freshwater dip as noted. David
 

Amphiprion

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Feb 14, 2007
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One other detractor is in the instance of specialized feeders, such as mandarins, certain angelfish, etc. If you allow one of these fish to sit in quarantine for the recommended 6-8 weeks, they'll practically starve (or already be dead) by the time they reach the display.
 

TropicalNorth

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Jun 9, 2006
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Freshwater dips don't get everything, and I think (don't quote me on this) the fish should only be in the dip for 3 minutes or so.

I didn't quarantine my three butterflyfish mainly because of the cons you mentioned. Butterflyfish can be hard enough to feed without putting them in a smallish bare tank.

I think the health of the fish at purchase is the most important thing, if there is even a slightest sign of a disease on the fish or anywhere in the system at the store then I wouldn't get it. Not all diseases/parasites are detectable by sight but in a shop system if there's something there you'll usually know. I am able to get my fish straight from the collector so its a bit easier for me to get really healthy fish.

Just my thoughts.
 

Amphiprion

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Feb 14, 2007
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They can remain in freshwater for longer than 3 minutes or so. That is generally considered the minimum, though some fish can't even last that long. The main part is observation, which is what will determine what can and cannot last. Ideally, the dip would be as long as possible. Now, if treating for ich, a freshwater dip is nearly useless. For larger external parasites, it can work very well, however.
 

DButikofer

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Apr 23, 2009
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How do you do a freshwater dip? Is it like a drip acclimation deal or full on submersion for a length of time?
 

Blown 346

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Dec 7, 2008
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For a QT you can use LR, but PVC works very well as well. For the FW dip for 30 minutes you will lose alot of fish. That will put more stress on any new fish more than a Empty QT tank.
 

Ghostryder

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Aug 25, 2011
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Hi all! I recently inherited two aquariums from a friend. After doing some reading and learning some of the basics, I have discovered a love for Aquaria. This is a hobby that appeals to my OCD! I have lots to learn, so I was happy to discover this forum and am really enjoying all of the questions and comments. Lots of good information here! Have a great day ya'll!
 
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