Very Stubborn Bacterial Bloom

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Apr 2, 2002
3,209
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New York
Water changes with water that closely matches what is in the tank cannot hurt. As long as you use dechlor. So of you are using your tap water in the tank, just make sure the changing water is withing about 6 degrees +/- to what the tank temp is. A 50% water change means even 6 degrees one way or the other can only change the tank water temp by 3 degrees.

Make sure your heater will be submerged when you take out 1/2 the water. I usually place heaters horizontally near the bottom of the tank on the back glass. This helps to hide it. Plus heat rises, so when the heater is on it will move heated water from the bottom towards the top of the tank. It also means you do not need to remember to unplug it during water changes and then to plug it back in.

If you have to place it vertically, it is only the nottom half that does the heating so if you can insure that half always is well submerged during a water change that will work. But in such cases it is best to get some new water back in fairly soon so you know the heating element is safely under the surface. In cases like this I am usually staring the refill almost as soon as the emptying is done. Media has been rinsed etc, before the last of the water comes out.
 

Chessolin

AC Members
Dec 30, 2021
8
0
1
Can heaters be used with an extension cord? How about an extension cord attached to a power strips? That's actually the whole reason my heaters are vertical lol cords are too short.

I am very careful to unplug my heater before water changes. My roommate in college didn't and her heater got a big lump. Like something ruptured inside.
 
Apr 2, 2002
3,209
569
120
New York
I have extension chords in use for tanks all over the place. The only thing to insure us that you use a heavier gauge wire. This is not hard to figure out as the wire is thicker the heavier the gauge. Also gauge numbers work in reverse, the lower the number, the thicker the wire.

The more current that has to pass through an extension chord, the the heavier the gauge should be. As long as you are running a 25 ft. or shorter extension cord 14 gauge is fine.

The only other thing to which you need to pay attention to is if the heater plug has two prongs and no ground or it has 3 prongs which means it has a ground. 3 prongs wire is always heavier duty than two prongs. Having a lower gauge wire than needed is always better than having a wire that is too thin.

https://www.thecleverhomeowner.com/how-to-tell-what-gauge-an-extension-cord-is/
 
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