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  1. #41
    Junior Member waterdawg's Avatar
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    Yes...I think you are overstocked or at least you will be (depends how big these fish actually are). If everbody is very small right now you are probably ok for the short term. Do frequent water changes and monitor water quality until you get your 55 up and running.
    20 gallon (long):
    1 Spotted Pictus Catfish
    2 Tiger Barbs
    2 Albino Tiger Barbs
    1 Mystery Snail

    29 gallon:
    3 Black Phantom Tetras
    3 Colombian Tetras
    2 Kuhli Loaches
    1 Twig Catfish

    20 gallon (waiting to cycle):
    5 Neon Tetras
    2 Glowlight Tetras


    :dance





  2. #42
    Star Wars Freak Bobafish's Avatar
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    I'd never heard it like that b4. Will take into cosideration, thx!
    5g: Female African Clawed Frog

    10g: 4 Harlequin Rasboras, 1 Dwarf Gourami, 2 ottos, many snails



  3. #43
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    What do you think of the "at least 10 gallons per goldfish" rule.....



  4. #44
    Junior Member Mike Rathnow's Avatar
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    People misunderstand about this rule...

    Yes, it is alright to keep, lets say 10, 1in. fish in a 10 gallon tank. "As long as the fish don't grow over that 1in. mark." And you don't want to try keeping a fish that when it grows lets say over 6" or bigger in a small tank like a 10gal. People need to use some kind of common sense when it come to housing fish. No, you're not going to want to keep a 10" oscar in a 10gal. tank. This "isn't" where the rule applies. The best rule of thumb is the bigger the tank the better for the fish. The best thing for newbies is to read up on the fish they want to keep. Find out what water conditions the fish need, and what is compatable with each other. You don't want to keep African cichlids with South American cichlids. Or decide to keep a Red devil in a well planted tank. When starting a community tank. You don't want to keep lets say Barbs with any log finned fish like bettas. In the 40 some years I've been keeping and breeding fish. I've found it best to keep fish with their own kind. And fish that are territorial keeping one male to 2 or 3 females work the best. If you even think your tank is getting over crowded, 9 times out of 10 it is. Don't make keeping fish hard. When starting a new tank, start out slowly. A new tank needs time to build up the proper bacteria's and water quality before you can introduce the fish you want. Get some feeder guppies and raise them in the tank for a couple of months before you go and introduce other fish. If the guppies don't make it, then something in the water is wrong, and you're not out a ton of money. All tanks need to be seeded correctly first. Oh well I ranted enough. Good luck to you all.

    Mike Rathnow



  5. #45
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    Fish metabolism. Some fish are like living playdoh poop factories

    Yup, a single large tinfoil barb can/will excrete more ammonia than 10x it's length in fish like Gouramis or tetras.



  6. #46
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    I work in an LFS (actually it's a chain, but our store is one of the better ones in our area, better even than some non-chain lfs. IF all our stores followed the necessary rules for keeping up our animals and/or tanks, they'd all be great, but I know not all our stores do..., oh and we're way better than our competitor chain), and I"ve gotten customers who come in with a new take on this rule that is even worse. They say "Now, the rule is, one fish per gallon of water, right? So, I can put ten fish in this ten gallon tank?". YIKES!! The bottom line most of our basic fish newbies want to know is how many fish they can put in one tank. (usually, how many fish can I have in this 1 gallon tank?). So, I say, actually, the rule you are thinking of is most likely "one inch of fish per gallon of water" and this is a huge generalization and doesn't work in all circumstances. I also explain that many fish have a minimum tank size required. And, that even though there is a minimum tank size, it doesn't mean you can only put one of those in that size, but rather you can (and often should with schoolers) have many of them in that size tank. (and/or other suitably tempered fish). (also, the one inch per gallon rule is much more for bioload(and still not always helpful, though usually fine for smaller thinner schoolers) rather than temperment, and that also must be taken into account) We reccomend that beginners start with no less than 20gallons, though many want to start smaller and get larger only if they have luck keeping fish alive. It's hard to get them to understand that it is actually easier to keep fish alive in a larger tank. (of course, we also have to explain that larger tanks are really not a huge pain to care for, because you don't want to remove all the water and wash all the gravel regularly...). Most of the time, our newbie customers feel as though we are trying to sell them more than they need with larger tanks and fancy filters. However, those who have done some research know we are setting them straight and usually are happy with our advice. We do get newer associates that have less fish experience than those of us with 7+ tanks, they however, will explain some of the basics, and say "I don't know" if they don't know an answer. They also don't hesitate to find someone more experienced to answer a question. So, at least we try very hard (with few exceptions, but those tend to weed themselves out of our business) not to provide misinformation. IT just gets tough to correct all the myths out there, and often we do have to sell fish to less than ideal environments. (though for really bad situations, we can say NO.).

    So, for someone who wants to put one fish per gallon, getting them to think about size of the fish (and not just current size, but future size as well) is a major breakthrough.

    If everyone would just do their homework , we'd be far better off!

    Emily



  7. #47
    Junior Member
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    the inch/gallon "rule"

    I have a 10 gallon tank with 4 platys and 4 guppies (2 bottom feeders) and there are 4 week-old fries still alive. They aren't bothering each other and the platys like eating lower in the tank than guppies. Is this ok in your opinion? fishy56
    fishy56
    (peej)



  8. #48
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    i have a 30 gallon tank could i put 2 yellow labs 2 convicts and 3 loaches in the tank -all 1 inch



  9. #49
    Member mdbaskett's Avatar
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    its not the fish, its human nature

    The problem with a rule is that people think if they follow the rule they can't go wrong. My fish are unhappy? Not my fault! I followed the rule! If people would use some sense instead of sticking to a rule that may or may not apply to their situation we wouldn't need to have this conversation.

    The problem with a rule such as the inch/gallon rule is that it is geared for a specific audience and open to interpretation. As a rule for beginners its not really informative enough. Experts, on the other hand, shouldn't need a rule. They should know enough about their fish to create an appropriate environment for them.

    Some newbies run out and get tank and fish without really taking the time to research and plan. Some newbies overplan and get paralyzed by all the conflicting information. I think a happy medium is preferrable.

    Keeping a 10" fish in a 10g tank is cruel. Keeping 10 - 1" fish in a 10g tank may or may not be, depending on the type of fish and the keeper's attentiveness to the wellbeing of the water and its inhabitants.

    I think a better rule would be that newbies not be allowed to buy tanks smaller than 20g without first passing a written test on aquarium cycling and maintenance.

    That being said, keeping 11 - 1" fish in a 10g tank may not be ideal but it doesn't make you a bad person.

    As for me? I was in a hurry to enjoy the hobby so I ran out and got a tiny tank before doing the research. Then I started reading, and reading, and reading. Before I bought fish I set up the tank, played with the filter, set up the heater, played with the heater, bought a new bulb, planted a few plants, tested the water, changed the water, played with the gravel vaccuum, went to the store and looked at fish and asked a lot of questions, fertilized, went back to the store to visit the fish, read some more and finally, after about 3 weeks, bought a few fish (I'm fishy cycling, gently).

    As soon as I bought my little 5g tank to start keeping fish I started saving for a bigger tank. Hopefully by the time my tank is crowded due to growth or my inability to leave the store without a new pet, I'll have set up a nice large home for the current inhabitants to move to and my 5g will make a nice quarantine.

    Misty
    brand newbie (planted for 2 weeks, added fish yesterday)
    5g tank
    3 glowlight rasboras
    1 amazon sword
    1 ozelot sword
    1 dwarf grass



  10. #50
    Senior Member bubbles42151's Avatar
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    yup yup yup

    it's always better to understock your tank any way!
    bubbles42151



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