algae

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mpx

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Dec 31, 2002
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is it necessary to cover a pond in order to prevent algae? We got a really powerful pump and uv light. The pond is halfway covered under the patio and is against the wall so it still gets sunlight, but not as much. But my parents still think that it is necessary to cover the area that isn't covered right now. I don't think it is necessary, what do ya'll think?
 

aquariaddictus

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Aug 17, 2002
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I'm with you - it' s not necessary. If you're running a UV sterilizer that's rated for the size of your pond, you shouldn't have an algae problem at all. If you need to shade your pond further, floating plants are a great alternative (hyacinths, water lettuce) and will help use up some of the nutrients that the algae would otherwise consume. Barley straw, available at pond supply stores or online at thatfishplace or Drs Foster and Smith, also works. I put mollies, swordtails, and variatus outside in the summer, along with a pleco or two, and they thrive on any algae that does manage to grow.

Curious: do you currently have an algae problem? And what fun would a pond be if it's half-covered?
HTH
judy
 

mpx

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Dec 31, 2002
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half covered - I really meant half shaded :eek:

I read that UV light should be used at the last stage of filtration. My dad set it up as the first. Does he really have to re-do it?

Right now there is no problem. My parents believe it will be when Summer comes.

They don't want plants 'cause it'll block the view of the fishes.

Can pleco's survive in outdoor pond all year round? I think coldest it gets is 40 deg. far. here in Orange, CA.
 

Ozma

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Nov 27, 2002
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Actually some floating plants encourage the fish to come to the surface because they feel more secure having something to "duck under". You may see more of the fish if you put some plants in. My fish also prefer coming up to the surface to nudge at the lily pads to feast on the bugs that collect on them. If there isn't enough cover, the fish are going to spend their time near the bottom of the pond.
 

aquariaddictus

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Aug 17, 2002
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I had to think about that a while. The problem I see with having your UV first is that all the gunk that is heading for the filter has to pass through the glass tube that exposes the water to the UV bulb. The glass can be somewhat delicate, so if you were filtering any serious debris, I can see a problem. The other fact is that this glass is eventually going to get dirty, cutting down the exposure to the UV light. If it's last in line, it will take longer to get dirty. You could technically be running a UV sterilizer with no effect if the glass is so green/brown that no light gets through.

This is off the top of my head. Ideally, I would read the owner's manual of my UV sterilizer and see what it says. If I could find it. When I do, I'll write again.
judy
 

aquariaddictus

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Aug 17, 2002
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And as far as plecos at 40 degress, no. You would have to have a tank indoors and just put them outside when the temp is appropriate. The lowest I've let my tropicals in the outdoor pond get was 56 degrees, and that was a slow acclimation. And I gave them a heater to huddle around until I could bring them back in. You may not end up with an algae problem at all; why not wait and see?
j
 
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