Low PH discussion

  • Get the NEW AquariaCentral iOS app --> http://itunes.apple.com/app/id1227181058 // Android version will be out soon!

Dale W.

Formerly known as "Reefscape"
Original poster
Oct 7, 1998
944
0
16
57
Koloa, Kauai, Hawaii
www.TheKOR.org
Jurupari Man


Posts: 923
From: NYC
Registered: May 2001
posted November 08, 2002 11:19 AM IP: Logged


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
20g tank, 5" DSB, 25 lbs. live rock. No fish yet. Ammonia & Nitrite = 0, Nitrate = ~12.5, SG = 1.025. Alkalinity = 4. That's all good, but the pH is a bit low at 7.8. I don't plan on keeping any corals, just fish. The water here in NYC is so soft that I was afraid this might happen. What can I do to bring the pH up to a more acceptable level and keep it there? Any kind of buffer? Or is 7.8 ok for fish?


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

OrionGirl


Posts: 2509
From: Cheyenne, WY US
Registered: Aug 2001
posted November 08, 2002 11:28 AM IP: Logged


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
You can add either a nylon baggie of crushed coral, or one of those decorative dead corals to the tank--it will increase the pH a bit. Not sure how tolerant SW fish are of lower pH--if they're like FW fish and can adapt or not. Think they could, but you might want to see if others have had any experience with this.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

quantim0


Posts: 244
From: NJ
Registered: Feb 2002
posted November 08, 2002 11:32 AM IP: Logged


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
the average pH of the ocean is approximitely 7.8. however due to increased CO2 abosorsion by corals zooxanthellae and other algaes the pH tends to be higher on reefs (8.1-8.3). a buffer could be used to raise the pH and keep it stable or the natural method of some crused coral as previosly suggested would be a good idea.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

slipknottin
Moderator


Posts: 4975
From: new britain, CT
Registered: Jan 2002
posted November 08, 2002 11:58 AM IP: Logged


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
that alk is a little low too (im assuming its in dKH)
Crushed coral, marine buffers, and kalk water will all work.

maybe find some agronite sand (home depot!) and put a thin layer of that over your DSB



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jurupari Man


Posts: 923
From: NYC
Registered: May 2001
posted November 08, 2002 12:46 PM IP: Logged


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Thanks for the tips... Buffers seem like the most effective way to go, so perhaps I'll pick up a marine buffer. I like the idea of the decorative dead coral too. Perhaps I'll pick one of those up too.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

wonder371


Posts: 65
From: San Mateo, CA
Registered: Oct 2002
posted November 08, 2002 04:54 PM IP: Logged


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
i only use buffers on my tank but i recently learned in these formus that baking soda works (i think it is baking soda) might wanna ask in the forums to make sure. But someone said that it can raise ph and save u some $$... just my research.
------------------
Pretty new to saltwater. Running eclipse 3 i think its apx. 30gal. Its only got sand, liverock, a powerhead(200gph for circulation), damsels, and a fire shrimp.Need alternate lighting + filtering ideas for the eclipse system.
(Thinking about making a sump/refigum) system for the eclipse any suggestions would be appricated)



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A. calva


Posts: 49
From: Alabama
Registered: Sep 2000
posted November 12, 2002 04:25 PM IP: Logged


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Baking soda will work, but you need to keep on top of it. Due to metabolic products in the tank, the pH normally drops over time.
I've used the formula:
0.15 x (tank vol. in gallons) = grams of baking soda to raise pH by 0.1

Be careful to not raise the pH too fast (0.1- 0.2 per day), but ideally it should be between 8.0 and 8.2

HTH,
Brian



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jurupari Man


Posts: 923
From: NYC
Registered: May 2001
posted November 12, 2002 05:10 PM IP: Logged


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I ended up purchasing Seachem's marine buffer. It has worked well, and the pH has held at around 8.2-8.3 for the past several days. Thanks...


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A. calva


Posts: 49
From: Alabama
Registered: Sep 2000
posted November 13, 2002 09:46 AM IP: Logged


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Is there a listing of the contents of the Seachem product? I'm curious what's in it.
Thanks,
B


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jurupari Man


Posts: 923
From: NYC
Registered: May 2001
posted November 13, 2002 11:37 AM IP: Logged


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
There isn't an ingredients list per se, but it does say that it contains sodium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, and potassium salts of carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride, sulfate, and borate...
 
zoomed.com
hikariusa.com
aqaimports.com
Store