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Oyster Reef Ecosystem Tank

Discussion in 'Brackish' started by Chasmodes, Nov 14, 2016.

  1. Chasmodes

    Chasmodes AC Members

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    Thank you Mark!

    OK, remember the jellyfish budding polyp (scyphistoma)? After a week or so of me discovering it, all of the larval medusas were released and I never saw them again. The base of the polyp remained but seemed to wither away to almost nothing. Well, last night, I noticed that it budding more larval medusas! These things keep on going! I'm amazed. This is really a cool event because the local aquarium is starting up a jellyfish tank, and I promised them that if I saw this again, that I'd donate them to their tank. How exciting!

    Here's the old video again in case you can't visualize it from before:
     
  2. Chasmodes

    Chasmodes AC Members

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    Not much to update, everything seems to be going well. A couple of my gobies have been scratching a little bit, so my paranoia kicks in each time. But then again, they've always done that to some extent. I saw the largest blenny scratch and its gills were really pumping a lot more than normal one evening, but since then, it's back to normal. I think that when I set up the big tank, I'm going to quarantine all of these fish and treat them with copper before adding them to the bigger system. I'll set the tank up fallow for six weeks at the same time. So, that is on my to do list, to set up a quarantine system.

    Now, this video creeps me out...
     
  3. Chasmodes

    Chasmodes AC Members

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    Last night, after feeding my fish, I watched them so long that I was way past my bed time, LOL, so I'm a bit tired today. I discovered another live barnacle that I never noticed before. I'm sure that it's been in there for several months.

    Also, I'm pretty sure the worm that was feeding in my last video is a clamworm (aka ragworm). From what I've read, even though they get large and creepy, that my fish aren't in any danger.

    In addition, I have a new critter, but I have no idea what it is. It kind of looks like an anemone, but could be the head and tentacles of another type of annelid. It doesn't go after the brine shrimp like the other worm does, and I have yet to see the tentacles pull anything in. That is why I doubt it is an anemone.

    If you look to the left edge of the video below of the feeding worm, you can see the tentacles, and they move about 1/2 way through the movie. Has anyone seen this before?
    Here's a link to the video again:
     
  4. Chasmodes

    Chasmodes AC Members

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    I was able to get a better video of the newly found critter. I have no idea what it is, but I suspect it is some kind of annelid. It doesn't do much, just sits there, waiting for detritus, I guess. Anyone know what this is? This is magnified 6x.


    Also, I have another anemone, as it turns out. I think this is a ghost anemone, but it much more pink than my other one. This is magnified 6x.


    This video is just a video update of the tank. The fish aren't very active as this is about an hour after they ate and stuffed themselves silly. The blennies and gobies are pretty much just hanging out in their hiding spots. Last night, I was kicking myself because the fish were really active. I'll catch them more active on the next video. Sorry for the glass not being clean, I forgot to do that before shooting the video. But, you can see all of the pods on the tank.
     
  5. Chasmodes

    Chasmodes AC Members

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    Some recent pics:
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  6. Chasmodes

    Chasmodes AC Members

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    This barnacle in my Chesapeake Bay biotope aquarium is trying to breed. Normally, their probing male reproductive organ will find a suitable mate and the process is complete. However, in this video, you can see milt released into the water column. An interesting note, barnacles, in proportion to body size, have the largest male reproductive organ in the animal kingdom!

     
  7. Chasmodes

    Chasmodes AC Members

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    Here's a video update where the fish are a bit more active (shot last week).
     

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