Welcome to AquariaCentral.com

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. You will be entering into a wonderful world of aquatic information, for all aquarists, no matter what their experience level.

Our members will do their best to help you in your aquarium endeavors. We have a vast assortment of Forums to dive into:

-General Freshwater
-Marine and Brackish area
-Terrarium and Vivariums
-Coldwater
-DIY, Classifieds, Members Tanks Photographs and more.

We even have a general area, that is just as much fun as the rest of the Community, for off topic discussions and a real-time chat room for instant advice!

Joining Aquaria Central has numerous benefits, but the best, is our 112,000+ members, helping one another in this fascinating hobby!

Register now, and be sure to check out our scheduled contests with exciting prizes!

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today! !

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.

Welcome to the Internet's friendliest aquatic forum!

- Team AC

  1. Get the NEW AquariaCentral iOS app --> http://itunes.apple.com/app/id1227181058 // Android version will be out soon!
    Dismiss Notice

Pleco - filtration needs

Discussion in 'Freshwater Newbie Forum' started by John-Eddie, Aug 4, 2017.

  1. Narwhal72

    Narwhal72 AC Members

    Real Name:
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2009
    Messages:
    764
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Last Seen:
    Yesterday at 4:53 PM
    It all really depends on what you are feeding the pleco. If a pleco is getting a diet of wood, vegetables, and algae most of the pleco poop is carbohydrate. Consisting mainly of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen and will not affect nitrate or ammonia levels. However if the pleco is being fed a high protein diet (with lots of amino acids full of nitrogen and phosphorous) then excess nitrate and phosphate are going to come out with that poop.

    It's still unsightly though, and because of it's physical size and weight vacuuming out the feces is the best way to remove it.

    Andy
     
  2. Narwhal72

    Narwhal72 AC Members

    Real Name:
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2009
    Messages:
    764
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Last Seen:
    Yesterday at 4:53 PM
    It all really depends on what you are feeding the pleco. If a pleco is getting a diet of wood, vegetables, and algae most of the pleco poop is carbohydrate. Consisting mainly of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen and will not affect nitrate or ammonia levels. However if the pleco is being fed a high protein diet (with lots of amino acids full of nitrogen and phosphorous) then excess nitrate and phosphate are going to come out with that poop.

    It's still unsightly though, and because of it's physical size and weight vacuuming out the feces is the best way to remove it.

    Andy
     
  3. FreshyFresh

    FreshyFresh AC Members

    Real Name:
    Joel
    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2013
    Messages:
    3,247
    Likes Received:
    187
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Location:
    West Falls NY
    Last Seen:
    Today at 3:35 PM
    Real Name:
    Joel
    Andy, I agree with you, but even a fish's normal respiration and body function is going to produce some ammonia, regardless of what they heat. Obviously there's a lot of factors at play, but I still find it hard to believe a fish that size in this volume of water, only produces the end result of 0-5ppm nitrates with this water change regimen.
     
  4. Narwhal72

    Narwhal72 AC Members

    Real Name:
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2009
    Messages:
    764
    Likes Received:
    34
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Last Seen:
    Yesterday at 4:53 PM
    You are probably right. But there are so many unknown factors that are difficult to account for.

    Although ammonia is excreted from fish in several ways, Ammonia in the aquarium cannot just be spontaneously created. There needs to be a source of nitrogen into the system. The only way that can happen is from food. Nitrogen gas is insoluble in water so it can't come from the air.

    In every aquarium, there is much more nitrogen fed to the fish than the fish is going to convert into new proteins and tissue. That is where ammonia comes from. The biological filtration will convert the ammonia into nitrite and then nitrate. Nitrate is much more difficult to metabolize which is why most aquariums accumulate nitrate over time.
    Plants and algae can absorb some nitrate from the water. But it does not appear as if this tank is loaded with plants and algae.
    The other way is anaerobic filtration. Anaerobic bacteria use nitrate as a source of oxygen and convert it to insoluble nitrogen gas.

    If there is a good anaerobic filter situation running it could explain the low nitrate levels. Anerobic conditions can arise within a canister filter that is clogged, a gravel bed that has been undisturbed for a long time, or a sponge filter with a very slow flow rate. The problem with anaerobic filtration is that it's not very stable and prone to going anoxic. When that happens the bacteria will then begin to convert sulfate to hydrogen sulfide in order to get oxygen. Hydrogen sulfide is toxic and can poison the aquarium.

    That's why changing the water, maintaining the filters, and vacuuming the substrate is so important. It dilutes nitrate, and prevents anaerobic and anoxic conditions from forming.

    Andy
     
    FreshyFresh likes this.

Share This Page

zoomed.com
hikariusa.com
aqaimports.com
Store