Stocking help

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Lefky

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Apr 14, 2019
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I have been really struggling to find fish to keep in my 20g long freshwater tank. I have gravel substrate and adding live plants very soon. The only problem with my tank is the water temp and the PH. The temp is always around 79-86F max (rarely that high) and my PH is around 7.5-7.8. I have made multiple lists of fish that I wanted but either they arent compatible or don't like the hard water. Some fish I was really looking into were: Paradise fish, gouramis and GBR's. What is everyones suggestions for top,middle and bottom dwellers that will thrive in my tank? (I am not wanting to get into breeding so I am ok with fish eating the eggs of another one)
 

FreshyFresh

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Jan 11, 2013
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I wouldn't be concerned with pH at all, unless it's a specific fish breeding project you're after. Any fish you buy locally will have been acclimated to your tap water's pH and be good to go. Fish will adapt to a pH. The issue is if you drastically and instantly change the pH, this is a killer.
 

Lefky

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Original poster
Apr 14, 2019
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I wouldn't be concerned with pH at all, unless it's a specific fish breeding project you're after. Any fish you buy locally will have been acclimated to your tap water's pH and be good to go. Fish will adapt to a pH. The issue is if you drastically and instantly change the pH, this is a killer.
Ok, good think my tap water has always had a constant ph! If it were to change how would I acclimate fish to the new ph?
 

FreshyFresh

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pH shouldn't change if you keep the contents of the tank the same and keep up on your weekly water changes. Some rocks, driftwood or substrates could change the pH, so it's wise to measure it for awhile if you change those items.
 

Lefky

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Original poster
Apr 14, 2019
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pH shouldn't change if you keep the contents of the tank the same and keep up on your weekly water changes. Some rocks, driftwood or substrates could change the pH, so it's wise to measure it for awhile if you change those items.
Thank you for the help!
 
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fishorama

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Jun 28, 2006
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SF Bay area, CA
It seems to me the high temps are of more importance than pH. Many of our fish are not wild caught, but raised in ponds in either Asia, Fla. or hobbyist bred. Many fish can adapt if slowly acclimated over hours, days or even weeks to a sustainable GH , KH & TDS range.
 

Lefky

AC Members
Original poster
Apr 14, 2019
48
2
8
16
It seems to me the high temps are of more importance than pH. Many of our fish are not wild caught, but raised in ponds in either Asia, Fla. or hobbyist bred. Many fish can adapt if slowly acclimated over hours, days or even weeks to a sustainable GH , KH & TDS range.
Whats the correct way to acclimate a new fish? I normally float the bag in the water for 10min, empty have the bag water and replace with tank water and let them sit again before gently releasing them.
 

fishorama

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Jun 28, 2006
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SF Bay area, CA
It depends on the difference between the bag water & your tank. I like to slowly acclimate fish to my tank parameters over an hour or 2 if they close-ish. Local fish may be close to your tank, but here it may be very different. You can't know unless you test.
 
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