Setup for Corydoras Eques (species only)

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fishorama

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Even if the didn't help with water, I love the look of the leaves! I used to give my shrmp tank maple leaves (the opposite pH effect of oak etc.) but it was just for the shrimp to graze on, not to add tannins really. I also loved the skeltonized leaf remains...I'd forgotten about that. I decorated my house with them sometimes :)
 
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NoodleCats

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Even if the didn't help with water, I love the look of the leaves! I used to give my shrmp tank maple leaves (the opposite pH effect of oak etc.) but it was just for the shrimp to graze on, not to add tannins really. I also loved the skeltonized leaf remains...I'd forgotten about that. I decorated my house with them sometimes :)
Maple leave the best skeletons behind, theyre more veiny. But break down faster compared to oak and Indian almond.

I love tulip tree leaves for the aquarium too. Theyre a neat shape and even dried tend to have a more bright colour to them. They're in the aspen/birch family and are safe for aquarium use. But they break down the fastest of any leaves used, unfortunately. Not much tannins from them either though. But nice contrast to use with other leaves.

I just bought the Indian almond leaves, got the mini ones since the giant ones are great for tannins but not the best for effect of a leaf litter covered bottom.
 

fishorama

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I don't think we have tulip trees here, we did on the East Coast, US. We have evergreen oaks that are different, slower to turn brown than others...but I don't have shrimp anymore on the West US coast. After 10 years here I'm still learning, that keeps life interesting lol.
 

NoodleCats

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I don't think we have tulip trees here, we did on the East Coast, US. We have evergreen oaks that are different, slower to turn brown than others...but I don't have shrimp anymore on the West US coast. After 10 years here I'm still learning, that keeps life interesting lol.
I dont think anyone ever stops learning. Always more out there lol


Yeah I am fairly sure tuliptree is a eastern tree. Such a beautiful tree though, my favourite.

Do you have sycamore out your way? Another good one to use too.
 

FJB

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Lots of sycamore just about everywhere in the Eastern USA!
If you have tried them, how would you compare Magnolia leaves relative to others (you say you like maples and oaks). Also, what about Camelia and Rhododendrum? (the leaves are similar in appearance to Magnolia). Further, a lot of folks like using almond leaves. If you have, how do they compare? I have tried Magnolia in the past but didn' keep them for long, only sufficient to be certain they are not toxic to common tropical fish. I have all 3 (Magnolia, Camelia and Rhodo, one tree of each in my backyard).
Thanks!
 
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NoodleCats

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Lots of sycamore just about everywhere in the Eastern USA!
If you have tried them, how would you compare Magnolia leaves relative to others (you say you like maples and oaks). Also, what about Camelia and Rhododendrum? (the leaves are similar in appearance to Magnolia). Further, a lot of folks like using almond leaves. If you have, how do they compare? I have tried Magnolia in the past but didn' keep them for long, only sufficient to be certain they are not toxic to common tropical fish. I have all 3 (Magnolia, Camelia and Rhodo, one tree of each in my backyard).
Thanks!
Magnolia is good, nice leaves, last decent compared to others. I'd rank magnolia just after oak.
1) Indian almond. 2) oak. 3)magnolia.

Ive used:
Indian almond, oak, elm, maple, sycamore, birch, cottonwood, tuliptree, ash, and beech. Tuliptree breaks down the fastest of the ones I've used.

Can't speak for the others you mentioned, I don't have those here and not sure on their safety either
 
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