what size tank would be best ??

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Lalo J.

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I think 29 gallons is good for your intended species. However if you become a dedicated aquarist and get into this (because it's a vice lol) you will soon trade that tank for a bigger one, so good luck :)
 

FreshyFresh

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"For a starter tank, I really like standard 29gal. It's the taller version of a 20gal long."

I think there is a typo here, otherwise it is not correct. A standard 29g is NOT the taller version of a 20g long. There are 20g long and 20g tall, the latter taller but shorter (length)....
I dunno what we're mixing up here, but a 29gal is for sure a taller 20 long. Both tanks are the same 30" x 12" footprint. I haven't seen one for sale in a long time, but you used to be able to get a 37gal that is also a 30"x12" footprint.
 
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dougall

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I have a 37, containing too many bettas.

it's the same footprint as a 20L and a 29g,

*shrugs*
 

Wyomingite

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What everyone said is 100% accurate, one thing I’ll add is after 35 years of fish keeping, trust me , get the biggest tank that you can. If you have room for a 40, but get the 20 , you’re almost certainly going to end up getting the 40 later anyway.
LMAO. This is so true. A 20 gallon long would be the minimum, a 29 would be better, and the biggest size you have room for would be best. If you become hooked you have some room to grow that way. And if you really become hooked, be careful because you won't just replace the tank with a smaller one, you'll just add another tank. And another. And another...

I started with a single 10 gallon tank when I was 15, actually a birthday present from my parents. A month later I had another 10 gallon tank, but my younger brother wanted it in his room. A couple of months later it ended up in my room, along with the 15 gallon and 5 gallon hex I'd acquired in the meantime. By the time I graduated from high school I had 11 tanks. By the time I graduated from college I had 25. By the time I married I had over 40. Today I have 50+ and by mutual agreement with the wife, I can have as many tanks as I want and keep any kind of fish, invert, amphibian or reptile I desire, just as long as it fits in the fishroom.

So beware, this hobby can be addictive! ;)

WYite
 

FishAddict74

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LMAO. This is so true. A 20 gallon long would be the minimum, a 29 would be better, and the biggest size you have room for would be best. If you become hooked you have some room to grow that way. And if you really become hooked, be careful because you won't just replace the tank with a smaller one, you'll just add another tank. And another. And another...

I started with a single 10 gallon tank when I was 15, actually a birthday present from my parents. A month later I had another 10 gallon tank, but my younger brother wanted it in his room. A couple of months later it ended up in my room, along with the 15 gallon and 5 gallon hex I'd acquired in the meantime. By the time I graduated from high school I had 11 tanks. By the time I graduated from college I had 25. By the time I married I had over 40. Today I have 50+ and by mutual agreement with the wife, I can have as many tanks as I want and keep any kind of fish, invert, amphibian or reptile I desire, just as long as it fits in the fishroom.

So beware, this hobby can be addictive! ;)

WYite
Haha, I started the same way, my first tank was an insanely over stocked 20 when I was 12 Wish my wife would let me have that many. I had 10 a few months ago but I currently have 6 but have an idea in mind to finagle a 7th into the mix
 

smitty

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Mu motto has been to give them the best that I can fit and afford.
 

mistyseim

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Hi. I shall agree with the above replies. One point for me though is for a beginner, you should get a bigger tank. 100 gal, perhaps. Because if you end up getting a fish tank that is too small, it can cause lots of problems. Generally speaking the bigger the aquarium the happier your fish will be.
 

FishAddict74

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Hi. I shall agree with the above replies. One point for me though is for a beginner, you should get a bigger tank. 100 gal, perhaps. Because if you end up getting a fish tank that is too small, it can cause lots of problems. Generally speaking the bigger the aquarium the happier your fish will be.
Bigger is always better but for a first tank, a 100g is a big investment and commitment for a new hobby someone may not even stick with.. While you should almost always get as big as you can, a newbie is probably best starting of with a 40b IMO unless they’re absolutely sure this is the hobby for them
 
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Wyomingite

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Bigger is always better but for a first tank, a 100g is a big investment and commitment for a new hobby someone may not even stick with.. While you should almost always get as big as you can, a newbie is probably best starting of with a 40b IMO unless they’re absolutely sure this is the hobby for them
+1. Don't go crazy on your first tank, get a little experience first to establish how much you enjoy yourself. A 29 gallon may be perfect for what you want.

This is a little outside your original question, but as long as you're seeking advice on a tank, there are some additional things to consider. Something that hasn't been mentioned is the weight of the tank. A 29 gallon tank filled with nothing but water in it weighs around 280 pounds. A 55 gallon tank filled with nothing but water weighs in around 540 pounds. This is without the stand, no gravel, additional weight from filters, a canopy, lights, and whatever else I'm forgetting. Anyways, my point is that tanks weigh a lot. To get a ballpark figure of how much the tank will weigh when full and set up, I use 12 pounds per full gallon to account for the weight of the gravel after displacement of the water, all equipment, stand, etc. That brings a 29 gallon to 348 pounds. A 55 gallon starts around 660 pounds, etc. My number might be conservative, but I've never had a problem and IMO better safe than sorry.

So when you decide what size, ask yourself where you want to put the tank. Do I own my home or am I renting? Some landlords may not allow any tanks over a certain size to avoid water damage in the event of a leak. What floor do I want it on or how old is my house? Larger tanks (55+ gallons) in older homes may need to be placed against a load bearing wall, if not on on a concrete slab on the main floor or in the basement. Make sure you put it where you want it the first time. Full aquariums have to be emptied before they are moved, and that's a pain. What kind of flooring am I putting the tank on? The weight will drive the foot of a metal stand with four or six legs into hard wood floors, laminate flooring, and linoleum tiles over time, marring the surface. And a leak on a carpet is really fun to clean up and dry out.

WYite
 
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